ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Hedge Bindweed, with Ivy and the Honeysuckle Common Climbers

Updated on August 1, 2015

Notes from a Lancashire Countryman

One can not venture far into the countryside of Lancashire without coming across at least on e of these species, and, more often than not , in the course of a ramble all three are likely to be encountered. Starting with the ivy , because it is probably the most widespread. This familiar evergreen climber, with its dark glossy leaves, sends out curious root like fibres along the length of its stems. These fibres are adorned with tiny disks at their tips which attach themselves to the bark of trees or to the stones and bricks of buildings, once attached they remain ,with a firm grip, for many years, sending out even more stems which spread and adhere to any surface they encounter.

Nature has deemed that these fibres can transform themselves into true roots when they come into contact with the soil. Ivy produces two forms of foliage, the familiar three to five lobed ones with a triangular outline found in shady aspects or low levels of growth and a less familiar egg shaped leaf with no lobes, that occurs when the plant has gained enough height to receive good light. Ivy is capable of reaching the tops of very tall trees.

The familiar shape of the ivy leaf on the left and the less familiar shape on the right. Photograph by D.A.L.
The familiar shape of the ivy leaf on the left and the less familiar shape on the right. Photograph by D.A.L.
Ivy flowers are borne in globular heads. Note the egg shaped leaves Photograph by D.A.L.
Ivy flowers are borne in globular heads. Note the egg shaped leaves Photograph by D.A.L.
Cultivated varieties are often grown in gardens as ornamental plants. Photograph by D.A.L.
Cultivated varieties are often grown in gardens as ornamental plants. Photograph by D.A.L.
Photograph by D.A.L.
Photograph by D.A.L.
Ivy flowers attract butterflies such as the comma butterfly above and the red admiral. Photograph by D.A.L.
Ivy flowers attract butterflies such as the comma butterfly above and the red admiral. Photograph by D.A.L.

When at the summit of a wall or tree the ivy produces flowers formed in cluster of a globular shape, they are short stalked. Although they have little fragrance they do attract butterflies and bees in large numbers and particularly hoverflies.. The flowers are seldom encountered before September, but continue to provide a source of nectar for insects well into early winter. the berries that succeed the flowers turn black when ripe are an important food source for birds particularly  wood pigeons  and members of the thrush family, the berries being available from late winter well into the spring. the berries produce 2-5 seeds each which are reliant on birds for their distribution by way of their droppings.

The species name helix indicates to wind around and refers to its habit. Ivy has been used as medicine in the past featuring as a component in cough mixtures and for bronchial complaints. In Homeopathy it is used for active thyroid, gall bladder, and for bronchial asthma. Poultices produced by the leaves were employed against rheumatism and sciatica. It was also said to reduce fevers and expel worms. However, ivy is POISONOUS and should never be used in home made preparations

The second of our subjects is the hedge bindweed a late flowering climber that produces large, white , trumpet like flowers, one of the largest flowers produced by native plants to Britain. The hedge bindweed Calystegia sepium is a hairless perennial that is found in hedgerows, wasteland and along woodland margins. It has a preference for damp soils.

This specimen of hedge bindweed has chosen the rosebay willow herb for support,. Photograph by D.A.L.
This specimen of hedge bindweed has chosen the rosebay willow herb for support,. Photograph by D.A.L.

Where established the plant can take over a locality. The white trumpet shaped blooms have no scent, however, they are a rich source of nectar and visited by small insects and long tongued night flying moths. The flowers are from 3.-3.5cm wide. They have 2 green sepals at the base partially hidden by two bracts which do not quite overlap. They may be encountered from July to September.

Hedge bindweed on bramble. Photograph by D.A.L.
Hedge bindweed on bramble. Photograph by D.A.L.
The large trumpet flowers have little scent but are rich in nectar.Photograph by D.A.L.
The large trumpet flowers have little scent but are rich in nectar.Photograph by D.A.L.
Foliage of hedge bindweed.Photograph by D.A.L.
Foliage of hedge bindweed.Photograph by D.A.L.
The light coloured sepals can be seen when the bracts are moved away. Photograph by D.A.L.
The light coloured sepals can be seen when the bracts are moved away. Photograph by D.A.L.

The tough sinuous stems twist and wind themselves around other plants or any other thing they may encounter. The stems have heart shaped leaves which are arranged alternately and at intervals along its length. These leaves vary in size. The veins may be better observed on the underside of the leaf. The plant can attain the height of over 3m and may become a persistent garden weed.

The genus name of Calystegia derives from two Greek words Kalyx indicating a cup and stege meaning a covering. The species name sepium refers to the prominent sepals. The hedge bindweed as been utilised in medicinal preparations in days gone by , an extract of the sap being used as a laxative. It is not recommended for home made preparations.

Finally we meet with the honeysuckle which binds its way around the twigs of hedgerows before producing the delightful fragrant flowers that fill the evening air with their beautiful scent, during the summer months. The scent is designed to attract night flying moths. The flower head is composed of whorls of up to 12 flowers that are long tubed and have two lips, they vary in colour from white or cream to dark peach and red, often they are a mixture tinged often with yellow. A feature of the flower is the way the stamens protrude when the flower is fully open. They may be encountered from June until October.

The flowers are then succeeded by red berries . The plants have a perennial rootstock. The stems of hedge bindweed may well grow to over 6m long. Honey suckle belong to the genus Lonicera, which is named after the German naturalist Adam Lonitzer 1528-1586.


The long tube flowers of honeysuckle are a rich source of nectar. Photograph by D.A.L.
The long tube flowers of honeysuckle are a rich source of nectar. Photograph by D.A.L.
Late summer foliage of honeysuckle. Photograph by D.A.L.
Late summer foliage of honeysuckle. Photograph by D.A.L.
The flowers are succeeded by red berries. Photograph by D.A.L.
The flowers are succeeded by red berries. Photograph by D.A.L.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      7 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi Sally's trove. They are considered to be weeds over here by many. Glad to have introduced you to the ivy flowers. Thank you for your visit and for leaving your appreciated comments. Best wishes to you.

    • Sally's Trove profile image

      Sherri 

      7 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

      I enjoyed reading about these plants from another's point of view. Your words reminded me that these plants have a beauty all their own, and a time and a place. Here, in the NE USA, these (or their variants) are mostly considered weeds and therefore to be eliminated.

      I have never seen the ivy blossom. Thank you so much for the wonderful photos.

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      7 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi B , ivy was used in poultices for such conditions and for sciatica among others. Thank you for reading and for leaving your usual kind comments. Best wishes to you.

    • Joy56 profile image

      Joy56 

      7 years ago

      long long ago, i used to get my little boys to go collect ivy in their tractor and trailer, i think i boiled it and rubbed it on my legs, was it for cellulite i cannot remember?

      Nothing falls as beautifully as natural ivy in a flower arrangement, i love the varigated ivy..... once again brilliant hub.

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      7 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Martie, Glad I got you in the mood for gardening. Thank you for reading and for your kind comments. Best wishes to you.

      Kaie, thank you so much compliments indeed! Glad you liked them. Best wishes to you.

    • Kaie Arwen profile image

      Kaie Arwen 

      7 years ago

      These photos are absolutely breathtaking! Beautiful............ Kaie

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 

      7 years ago from South Africa

      Beautiful pictures! Awesome plants! We have these in South Africa as well. It turns gardens into paradises. You’ve got me in a mood for gardening now ! Thanks. Voted UP and UP.

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      7 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Welcome back Darski, missed your company. Do not use ivy for home preparations it is poisonous and needs to be produced and administered by professional herbalists. See My hub A PRICKLY SUBJECT for an alternative preparation for bronchitis. Hope this finds you and Sherry in good spirits. Love and best wishes to you both.

    • Darlene Sabella profile image

      Darlene Sabella 

      7 years ago from Hello, my name is Toast and Jam, I live in the forest with my dog named Sam ...

      Hello my dearest friend, so happy to read another one of your awesome hubs, is their any way that Ivy could be mixed at home to create cure for brocities? I am back home now and have brought my daughter home with me to be with me at this time. My life has changes in so many ways this past summer. Love this hub awesome, beautiful and useful...your friend and fan always darski

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)