ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

History of American Towns: Oquawka, Illinois

Updated on September 26, 2014

Oquawka, Illinois

Source

Inscription on Norma Jean memorial

Source

Memorial

Source

Norma Jean Monument

Source

It’s been quite a few years since we had made the trips along the Mississippi River in Illinois. At the time I worked in Rock Island, Illinois at the Rock Island Arsenal. I commuted from a small town named viola about 25 miles south of where I worked. Sometimes, for a scenic ride we would drive to the town of New Boston, IL which was on the riverside. From there we would follow the river and sometimes cross over to Burlington, Iowa. The trip to Burlington and back made a nice day trip. There were no other bridges but there were a number of interesting towns and the river bluffs were impressive.

On one such trip we followed the river road and came to the town of Oquawka. We passed a wharf that had restaurant advertising catfish dinners. I thought it would be a nice place to stop and eat one day. Driving up from the river we passed a town square with a small monument and something about an elephant. That elephant is sort of the town’s claim to fame, although there are some other attractions.

The elephant, Norma Jean According to the website “Find A Grave” the elephant Norma Jean was born August 10, 1942 and died July 17, 1972 in Oquawka, Henderson County, Illinois. She was the main attraction for the Clark and Walters Circus. Roadside America.com reports Norma Jean as a 6,500 pound elephant and the star of the circus. Her life ended when she was struck by a bolt of lightning and her trainer was knocked 30 feet by the lightening. Since Norma Jean was the star of the circus, it went out of business within a year.

The elephant was buried where she died, according to a Roadside America Report. Weighing over 6,000 lbs., it would have been difficult to move her. The town was willing to leave it go at that, but a local pharmacist by the name of Wade Meloan raised enough money to give Norma Jean a monument and the town allowed it to be placed in the town square.

The town now has a celebration each August in honor of the Elephant killed by lightning.

Covered Bridge

Wagon Bridge

Another landmark of Oquawka is the covered Bridge referred to as the Wagon Bridge. It is about 2 ½ miles south of the town in Henderson County. It replaced a bridge called the Eames Bridge. It is made of wood and was built in 1866. Until 1935 it was part of the road over Henderson Creek. It became a footbridge when the road was moved by the state. February 24, 1975 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. (Wikipedia)

Henderson County

Oquawka is the county seat of Henderson County, which was formed in 1841 County which was formed from Warren County, according to e-referencedesk.com. Many immigrants to this area came from Henderson County, Kentucky and their influence led to naming the county after their Kentucky home county. Parts of Warren County, Pike County, Madison County, and St. Clair County were included in the present Henderson County. Kentucky’s Henderson County was named for Richard Henderson who founded the Transylvania Company. (E-referencedesk.com)

“The first settlements were made about 1827-28 at Yellow Banks, now Oquawka,” according to e-referencedesk.com. The Blackhawk war stopped much of the immigration to the area. It started again after the war and the removal of Indians from the area. In 1841.

Delabar State Park

Oquaka, Illinois

A
Oquaka, IL:
Oquawka, IL, USA

get directions

© 2014 Don A. Hoglund

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      20 months ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Jodah, thanks for reading and commenting. I think every town has a story, sometimes long forgotten. I'll try to get back to writing about more of them.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      20 months ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      vocalcoach, Thanks for reading this hub. It is a nice little river-town that we had driven through many times but the story of the elephant is what made me want to write about it.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      20 months ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      vocalcoach, Thanks for reading this hub. It is a nice little river-town that we had driven through many times but the story of the elephant is what made me want to write about it.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      20 months ago from Queensland Australia

      This was a very interesting read, Don. Thanks for sharing this information about a town I had never heard of before.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 

      20 months ago from Idyllwild Ca.

      Thank you for this wonderful presentation. I love history and visiting old historic places.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      2 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Thanks for the historical information.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      2 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Thanks for the historical information.

    • profile image

      midwest 

      2 years ago

      People forget the real history of the town. Yellow banks known as Oquawka, was the first place Fr. Marquette met the Native Americans on the Mississippi river in May of 1673, as he and Joliet explored all the way to the Arkansas River. Upon their return the Native Americans told them of a shortcut up the Illinois river back to the Great Lakes. As they went up the Illinois River, they discovered the same Native Americans on Lake Pimiteoui, (fat lake) Peoria Lake at Peoria,IL. Black Hawk wrote his autobiography with the editor of the Oquawka newspaper and said he was born at Yellow Banks. Also, Oquawka was one of the first outposts of the West, or Illinois Territory. The Phillips Bros. bought a house built by a Captain and local Native Americans. It was a trading outpost. Stephen A. Douglas, of the famous Lincoln debates, often stayed in the house during his visits to Oquawka. Stephen A. Douglas, frequently presided over the once Warren County Circuit Court , now Henderson County. The house was also rumored to be a stop on the Underground Railroad. It is registered on the National Register of Historical Places.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      2 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Thanks for reading, Joe.

    • profile image

      Joe tucker 

      2 years ago

      i live hear

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      3 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      aesta1. I think there is something special about a town that honors a circus elephant because it died there. Thanks for reading and commenting.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Enjoyed reading about this town with a unique name. It is always interesting to go exploring and discover some of these places.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      3 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Thanks for reading and commenting, Peggy. There are a number of small towns along the Mississippi River there. There is something about river town. Thanks for the votes and sharing.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      It is always interesting to learn about these small towns and what makes them unique. The story of that elephant being struck by lightening and the monument is certainly far from the norm! Enjoyed the video regarding Delabar State Park. I will bet it is pretty with the autumn leaves at this time of year. Up votes and sharing.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      3 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      suziecat, Thanks for commenting. Covered bridges are cool.

    • suziecat7 profile image

      suziecat7 

      3 years ago from Asheville, NC

      It sounds like an interesting place. I also love old covered bridges. Good Hub!

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      3 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Suhail, thanks for reading and commenting. This town is probably not too far from Monmouth.

    • Suhail and my dog profile image

      Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent 

      3 years ago from Mississauga, ON

      Well, I have traveled throughout Illinois, including small towns like Monmouth, but haven't been to these small towns. A great article on small town Illinois.

      Btw, that video is a great add. It is very informative on the state park.

    • dahoglund profile imageAUTHOR

      Don A. Hoglund 

      3 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Hi Jackie! I really don't know too much about covered bridges, but my guess is that they were covered to keep rain and snow from getting on the road part of the bridge. That would probably help to keep it from becoming slippery.

      Thanks for reading, voting and sharing.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 

      3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Very interesting story. Thanks for sharing it. Sounds like a great place to travel through. I love the covered bridges. First place I ever saw any of those were in Massachusetts years ago and always wondered what they were for. For a time out of the weather? Up and sharing.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)