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Home School V.S. Public Education

Updated on January 8, 2017

There are many pros and cons to homeschooling and public education. Just as public education may not be suitable and the best learning environment for every child, homeschooling may not be the best option for your child or family. Finding the right choice for your child(ren) and your family is the first step in deciding which route to take your family.

Each child leans differently and it is important to cater to each child's needs. The best learning environment is one that a child can learn naturally.

Homeschooling

More and more families are choosing to home school their children. However it is important to choose the right education for your children and not the right education based on your beliefs or values.

There are many pros to homeschooling and the cons are not necessarily cons for everyone. Many believe that home schooled children have a harder time with social interaction. That is not entirely true. Social interaction falls upon the parents and requires them to allow their children to join activities in the neighborhood as well as forcing their children to play outside and get to know the neighbors.

Pros:

Free to choose curriculum and schedule

One on one learning with "teacher" and student

Family oriented learning, where parents are more involved in the child's education

Better and more opportunities for field trips and hands on learning

Pace is set to child's learning style and abilities

Community involvement through sports, clubs, and volunteering

Students are scoring higher on standardized and state testing

Cons:

Ususally more expensive than public schooling

Parents not always qualified to teach all subjects; educating can be hard work

Parents base whole curriculum around religious or other personal beliefs and do not provide well rounded education on topics they do not believe in or approve of

Harder to provide social interaction

Colleges may have stricter admission policies

4 room 2 story structure used as a school house in Beaverton Or
4 room 2 story structure used as a school house in Beaverton Or | Source
Wells Street Public School Aurora, Ontario 2008
Wells Street Public School Aurora, Ontario 2008 | Source

Public Education

Many parents need a break from their children and put them in school not just for the education but the much needed time apart. Parents believe that these teachers are well educated and will give their children the rounded education they are looking for. The many pros and cons listed below will hopefully help make your education decision easier.

Pros:

Learn within a group setting with more curriculum options

Diverse social education and interaction

Extra-curricular activities available

Band, choir, and arts in schools that have not cut them out

Child can attend with friends

State certified teachers

Accountability of school to higher authority, students will be taught what they need to learn


Cons:

Little school choice; most have to attend the school in their zone

High student teacher ratio; child is just a number

Peers based on location instead of choice

Less independence; school choose curriculum and pace

Gifted and struggling students lost in the shuffle

Too much emphasis on standardized testing

Negative social interaction; bullying

Budget cuts

What your family is looking for will ultimately depend on what education you decide for your children. However it is always important to remember that it is the child's best interest in what education you should provide for them. Just because you want to home school your child does not mean that you should.

Children learning in a homeschooling environment that is sheltered by a belief system or other bias can grow up worse off than if they would have been in public education. Not teaching your child about the ins and outs of the things you don't believe in can be harmful to the child. Children need to learn to make their own decisions and beliefs. Ensuring a well rounded child requires a well rounded education whether you believe in everything you teach or not.

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    • katedonavon profile image

      katedonavon 5 years ago

      I like the pros and cons feature: instead of making a judgment about which educational system is best, you show both sides. I am a proud homeschool grad and hope to homeschool my own children someday. Voted up!

    • Shesabutterfly profile image
      Author

      Cholee Clay 5 years ago from Wisconsin

      Thanks for the vote up katedonavon! I personally am for homeschooling, but I know it's not right for every child or every family. I think it's a great idea to know about each side before jumping into a major educational decision that will ultimately affect the child's learning:)

    • profile image

      ElleBee 4 years ago

      Good analysis of pros and cons. I like that you stress not only is the best decision different for every family, but it may in fact be different for different children within the family! I think homeschooling is a great option for many people, as long as - like you said - parents approach it open mindendly, with the intention of giving their children the best education possible.

    • Shesabutterfly profile image
      Author

      Cholee Clay 4 years ago from Wisconsin

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting ElleBee. Every child is different, and that goes for learning styles as well:) I personally like homeschooling as an option over public school, but that decision I will leave to my children when I have them.

    • JoanCA profile image

      JoanCA 4 years ago

      There are many public homeschooling programs through charter schools, online schools and public school districts. So, homeschooling doesn't have to be expensive. I homeschool through a charter school. All the books are paid for and classes are provided to the homeschool kids as well.

    • Shesabutterfly profile image
      Author

      Cholee Clay 4 years ago from Wisconsin

      JoanCA-That is very true, with technology and times changing homeschooling can be very inexpensive. Thanks for reading and the comment.

    • dianetrotter profile image

      G. Diane Nelson Trotter 4 years ago from Fontana

      I am a music teacher and music teachers are required to teach to the test. At the end of the day, teaching to the test is putting a lot of pressure on schools. Our principal won't let the choir go to festivals because language arts and math scores are low.

    • profile image

      jenn 4 years ago

      I am currently considering homeschooling. I have never believed in homeschooling until recent events at my daughters school. I have many reason that I want to temporarily pull my child from public education. I would love to get some advice on where to find a good cirrculum and/or steps I need to take. I have been researching for a few days and I feel as though I am going in circles.

    • mukappamom profile image

      Kelly Babb Dalton 3 years ago from Saint Johns, Florida

      Wonderful list of pros and cons for each method of education. Your hub was well organized and very well written and I appreciate that you point out the need for research on this subject as it pertains to each family, AND each child.

      A couple of things onto which I zeroed in -- were that you mentioned a public school might have more curriculum options. This is actually quite contrary to my findings as I've learned that teachers and schools are required to use the curriculum and resources allotted to them by the local Board of Education. However, I have also found that great communication between the parent and the Board, can result in requested changes as long as the committees agree on said changes.

      In your hub, you have also touched on a subject that hits quite a raw nerve in my personal experience - AND - you have hit the nail quite efficiently on the head. Homeschooling is not for every parent, but it needs to be said that this has very little to do with the level of education obtained by a parent that desires to homeschool their children. There are curriculum and on line resources that provide nearly word-for-word instruction for certain subjects and more than a few of them are free of charge. In addition, and this is the raw nerve part - I find it a heart-breaking truth that many parents need public school to give them a break from their children. In my twelve years as a homeschooling parent and in the research I've personally put into our local schools, I have seen that in some cases, a parent's interest and involvement in the education of his child stops when the child steps foot onto the school bus - or steps out of the car at parent pick up. This is very truly sad. I agree that parents need a breather now and then. Date night with one's spouse is a wonderful way to do this - and for those single parents out there, a really great gal's/guy's night out does wonders toward the recharging of one's parental batteries. But if a parent truly NEEDS between five and seven hours out of every day for an average of 180 days of the year AWAY from their child...why do they have children in the first place? And what message does this really send to them?

      I reiterate, homeschooling is not for every parent. Some house-holds require dual income. Some house-holds have only one parent to juggle their child's educational needs with his physical ones. But PARENTHOOD IS for every parent. Getting involved with your children, no matter the choice of education for them, will go a long way into the healthy and well rounded development of our most precious responsibility.

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