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How to Create a Flipped Classroom

Updated on April 9, 2012

Sample Flipped Classroom Video

What is a Flipped Classroom?

A flipped classroom is a small idea that may have a revolutionary effect on how students learn. It flips traditional teaching by allowing teachers to deliver their lectures outside of class and puts homework into the classroom.

Why should you flip your classroom?

1. Students say that your class makes sense in the classroom when you are explaining it, but when they go home to do their homework they don’t know how to apply the concepts and their parents don’t know the subject to be able to help them.


2. Students are absent on a day you teach a key concept and have a hard time attending tutoring because of extracurricular or employment obligations.


3. Some students grasp onto a concept quickly, but others need to hear it several times before they get that “aha”moment.

Tools for a Flipped Classroom

Livescribe 4 GB Echo Smartpen
Livescribe 4 GB Echo Smartpen

Use this smartpen to capture everything you write and say. This is a great tool for showing students how to complete math problems, edit sentences, etc.

 

How can you flip your classroom?

1. Record short 10 minute lectures of your Powerpoints or Prezis through the use of screencasting software or through the use of a Smartpen.

2. Post your video online or make DVDs for students who do not have internet access at home.

3. Follow up on the video in class by using hands on assignments and practice problems that expand and clarify the lecture.

What are some drawbacks to the flipped classroom?

What if the student doesn't have internet access at home?

If a student doesn’t have internet at home, you can load the videos onto a flash drive or make DVDs for a minimal cost.


What if a student doesn't watch a video?

Daily quizzes can be used to check to see if a student watches the videos. Of course, you cannot guarantee your students will watch the videos, but you can't guarantee they will always listen to you in person either! Your best bet is to provide informative and interesting videos that they will like.

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    • hectordang profile image

      hectordang 5 years ago from New York

      This is an interesting idea. With the invention of websites like khanacademy.org, it's possible to get students to get the direct instruction at home and then do practice and get feedback in the classroom. It's worked really well in my classroom!