ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to Protect Turtles: Practical Ways to Help an Endangered Species Survive

Updated on May 7, 2015
 Female and juvenile Midland Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata) basking in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Female and juvenile Midland Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata) basking in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada | Source

Turtles have walked the earth and inhabited the oceans since prehistoric times. They are the denizens of wetlands living on bugs, sometimes small fish, aquatic plants and algae. They are ectothermic creatures (cold-blooded); thus, they are often found sunning themselves on a log or exposed rock. Their body temperature changes with their environment. They seek out a sunny place to warm-up their body and when too hot they submerge themselves in the cool pond or under shady vegetation. Turtles are observed most often in June, during the height of their breeding season. Females are often observed crossing the road to reach traditional nesting sites or while looking to lay eggs in the gravel along the road. Turtles look for nesting sites with easy to dig soil that has enough moisture to support the eggs during incubation. Quality nesting sites are also located in sunny areas (also afforded by road-side nesting sites) as the warmth is also required for incubation. The eggs generally hatch in late summer or early fall. The gender of many turtles, including all the turtle species found in the Kawartha area of Ontario, is determined by incubation temperature. More females are produced during long, hot summers. The hatching success rate for turtles is very low as less than one in a hundred turtle eggs laid will hatch and grow into an adult turtle. Although adult turtles have few predators, their young and eggs are easy prey for raccoons, skunks, foxes and coyotes.

Seven Species of Turtle in Ontario are designated as “species at risk”.

  • Snapping Turtle
  • Blanding’s Turtle
  • Northern Map Turtle
  • Stinkpot
  • Wood Turtle
  • Spotted Turtle
  • Spiny Softshell

Reasons behind the Decline of Turtle Populations in North America

Unfortunately, civilization has damaged and reduced turtle habitat resulting in many turtle species becoming endangered. The following are some of the reasons for the decline of North American turtle species.

  • Fragmentation of their habitat by roads means individual populations become isolated from one another. Breeding populations become smaller because fewer animals will cross the road boundary while many that make the attempt are killed during their crossing.
  • Destruction of wetland habitat due to nearby construction.
  • Direct destruction of wetland that is drained and built up for housing and commercial ventures.
  • Increased mortality of turtles crossing a road or venturing too near a road in order to lay eggs in the soft gravel shoulder of the road.
  • Hunting of certain species of turtle such as the Snapping Turtle for sport, meat and often for their eggs.
  • Introduction of foreign species of turtles such as the release of Red Ear Sliders bought as pets in Ontario, then released into the wild when no longer wanted.
  • In the case of sea turtles, collision with boats (particularly propellers) and damage to their habitat by pollution.
  • Human encroachment on beach nesting sites of sea turtles.

Turtle Species at Risk in Ontario and parts of United States

Click thumbnail to view full-size
 Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina), female, looking for site to lay eggs, Rideau River, Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaNorthern Map Turtle (Graptemys geographica), Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaStinkpot turtle (Sternotherus odoratus). Picture taken in Southeastern Ontario, Canada.Blanding's Turtle laying her eggs in gravel driveway in Perry, Michigan.At home on land or in water, wood turtles are found near clear brooks and streams in deciduous forests, as well as in swamps, bogs, wet meadows and fields. Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata). North Carolina, USA.Spiny Softshell Turtle, Apalone spinifera
 Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina), female, looking for site to lay eggs, Rideau River, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina), female, looking for site to lay eggs, Rideau River, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada | Source
Northern Map Turtle (Graptemys geographica), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Northern Map Turtle (Graptemys geographica), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada | Source
Stinkpot turtle (Sternotherus odoratus). Picture taken in Southeastern Ontario, Canada.
Stinkpot turtle (Sternotherus odoratus). Picture taken in Southeastern Ontario, Canada. | Source
Blanding's Turtle laying her eggs in gravel driveway in Perry, Michigan.
Blanding's Turtle laying her eggs in gravel driveway in Perry, Michigan. | Source
At home on land or in water, wood turtles are found near clear brooks and streams in deciduous forests, as well as in swamps, bogs, wet meadows and fields.
At home on land or in water, wood turtles are found near clear brooks and streams in deciduous forests, as well as in swamps, bogs, wet meadows and fields. | Source
Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata). North Carolina, USA.
Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata). North Carolina, USA. | Source
Spiny Softshell Turtle, Apalone spinifera
Spiny Softshell Turtle, Apalone spinifera | Source
Greetings from Texas. NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Galveston Laboratory raises captive sea turtles for research and rehabilitates sea turtles injured by fishing and other activities.
Greetings from Texas. NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Galveston Laboratory raises captive sea turtles for research and rehabilitates sea turtles injured by fishing and other activities. | Source

A number of initiatives have developed in North America to help the struggling turtle populations

  • Kawartha Turtle Trauma Center provides a rehabilitation center for mainly Ontario turtles. Anyone who finds an injured turtle can bring that turtle to the center where they provide veterinary care. The Center is often able to extract eggs from female turtles, incubating the eggs and hatching baby turtles. During the winter of 2011/2012 the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Center “is caring for approximately 200 healing or young turtles. Last year, more than 600 turtles were submitted.”[1] “This winter the centre is incubating more than 1,000 eggs. The eggs extracted from the Oshawa turtle recently hatched into eight healthy babies.”[2]
  • Turtle S.H.E.L.L. Tortue. was established in 1999 to care for turtles, install highway turtle crossing signs, to provide public education and awareness regarding local turtle populations and habitats.
  • Ecokare International is conducting an inventory of the over 700 turtle crossing signs in Ontario to determine where and how they are placed in the landscape and ultimately what effect they are having in reducing turtle mortality.
  • A new report released by the David Suzuki Foundation, Ontario Nature and the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre, details the need for a proactive approach to save turtle species. One of their recommendations involves eco-passages – fences leading to culverts under roads with high turtle traffic. Time, money and government cooperation would be key to such eco-roads but the Ministry of Transportation is showing a willingness to work with local organizations.
  • The Georgia Sea Turtle Center operates on Jekyll Island, Georgia and through its education programs increases awareness of habitat and wildlife conservation challenges. It is a hospital for ill and injured sea turtles.
  • American Tortoise Rescue was created in 1990 for the protection of all species of tortoise and turtle.
  • Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center: A Sea Turtle Hospital on Topsail Island, NC is an American not for profit in North Carolina committed to the care and release of sick and injured Sea Turtles.
  • Critter Crossings This web site from the US Department of Transportation describes transportation's impacts on wildlife and highlights exemplary projects and processes that are helping to reduce these impacts.
  • Ontario Wildlife Rescue Their primary goal is to connect people who have found injured or orphaned wild animals including turtles with those who can look after them and get them back into the wilds. Through a network of rehabilitators and wildlife centres across Ontario, they try to save as many wild animals as possible.

[1] Frank, Sarah. “Uncertain Future”. Peterborough This Week. Friday, February 24, 2012.

[2] Frank, Sarah. “Uncertain Future”. Peterborough This Week. Friday, February 24, 2012.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Sign for Turtle Crossing, Middle of Nebraskaurtle crossing sign in British Columbia. Erected to minimize deaths of endangered (in BC) painted turtles.Jensen Sea Turtle Beach, Jensen Beach, Florida: one of several dune crossings to the beach.
Sign for Turtle Crossing, Middle of Nebraska
Sign for Turtle Crossing, Middle of Nebraska | Source
urtle crossing sign in British Columbia. Erected to minimize deaths of endangered (in BC) painted turtles.
urtle crossing sign in British Columbia. Erected to minimize deaths of endangered (in BC) painted turtles. | Source
Jensen Sea Turtle Beach, Jensen Beach, Florida: one of several dune crossings to the beach.
Jensen Sea Turtle Beach, Jensen Beach, Florida: one of several dune crossings to the beach. | Source

What do I do if I find an Injured Turtle?

  • Record the exact location where the turtle was found. This action helps to identify road mortality hotspots and allows the healed turtle to be returned to its original habitat.
  • Carefully remove the turtle from the road taking note of any gross injuries. For snapping turtles, see the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre website for specific information on handling these creatures.
  • Handle the turtle as little as possible.
  • If possible, place the injured turtle in a clean container for transportation.
  • Do not give the turtle food or water.
  • Take the turtle to the nearest wildlife rehabilitation center.
  • Call any shelter considered first, as some shelters do not treat injured reptiles.

What can you as an Individual do to help struggling Turtle Populations?

  • Do not release pet turtles into the wild.
  • If you come across a turtle crossing the road, help it to do so safely. Always make sure you move the turtle in the direction they were travelling. Shuffle them onto a car mat and pull them across the road to speed up the crossing. Snapping Turtles if needed to be coaxed across the road require a bit more care. Never handle them near the head. The Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre provides instructions for the safe handling of Snapping Turtles.
  • Set up a campaign to raise funds for turtle crossing signs to be placed along high risk roads near wetlands where turtles are known to cross the road.
  • Raise awareness in your school community by researching the plight of turtles in your area and presenting your results in class or as a science fair project.
  • Do not buy products made from turtle skin or shell.
  • Avoid buying wild turtles as pets.
  • If you live in or sight a turtle in Ontario, visit the Ontario Turtle Tally website to report your turtle sighting.
  • Organize a group to clean-up local stream and pond areas of human debris.
  • If your property is suitable, create a mini-wetland in your yard by building a small pond. You will be sure to attract wildlife including local turtles and frogs!
  • Organize a fundraiser or rally to support a local turtle rehabilitation centre.

Where to Take Injured Turtles found in Ontario

A
Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre at the Riverview Zoo.:
1230 Water St, Peterborough, ON K9H 7G4, Canada

get directions

Location of the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Center

B
Toronto Wildlife Centre:
60 Carl Hall Rd, Toronto, ON M3K 2C1, Canada

get directions

C
Turtle Haven:
14 Mansion St, Kitchener, ON N2H 6N9, Canada

get directions

D
Woodlands Wildlife Sanctuary:
Duck Lake Rd, Dysart and Others, ON K0M 1S0, Canada

get directions

E
Procyon Wildlife:
6441 7th Line Beeton Creek Conservation Area Beeton, ON. L0G 1A0

get directions

F
Heaven's Wildlife Rescue:
Oil Springs, ON N0N 1P0, Canada

get directions

G
Wabi River Wildlife:
Uno Park Rd, New Liskeard, ON, Canada

get directions

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Liz 

      4 years ago

      Last June we took a female Blanding Turtle that had been run over to Sandy Pines in Napanee. Unfortunately, she didn't make it, but 12 eggs were successfully extracted. I understand the wee turtles are now at Kawartha. It would be great to show this location on your map too as there are a lot of turtles in Prince Edward County! Unfortunately, their habitat may be put at risk again because of possible wind turbine installations. Can private individuals put up turtle crossing signs?

    • Teresa Coppens profile imageAUTHOR

      Teresa Coppens 

      6 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Thanks for the positive feedback. I just love seeing any turtle sunning itself on a rock or log!

    • Ophi profile image

      Ophi 

      6 years ago from Orange Texas

      Very nice write up! Awesome job! My favorite turtle is the box turtle.

    • Teresa Coppens profile imageAUTHOR

      Teresa Coppens 

      6 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Thank-you Pannonica. Conservation of endangered species is also part of my educational background and one of my passions. I am so happy you appreciated this article. I hope to write similar hubs in the near furture. So glad to hear from you again!

    • Pannonica profile image

      Pannonica 

      6 years ago

      Hi Teresa. Supporting the conservation of an endangered species is a passion for me. I will admit I know nothing about turtles, although having said that and reading this excellent hub I have a little more knowledge now.

      Thank you for raising an important issue in the world today. We are losing too much of our wildlife and it is thanks to people like yourself that are bringing the awareness to the general public. Well done great hub.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)