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How BAGYO originated; interesting facts about Philippine typhoons

Updated on August 6, 2012

Typhoon Pepeng kills 492 Filipinos and P27.195 B worth of crops and properties

Typhoon Pepeng (Parma) in Dagupan City, Philippines, Oct. 10, 2009
Typhoon Pepeng (Parma) in Dagupan City, Philippines, Oct. 10, 2009 | Source

how typhoons came to be known as BAGYO

Click thumbnail to view full-size
map of Baguio Citytropical storm THELMA or URING in 1991 was considered the most destructive or deadliet for killing 5,101 to 8000 Filipinos who got drowned in its floods.Typhoon Mike / Ruping at its peak approaching the Philippines.  It occurred Nov. 10 to 14, 1990 as the 4th costliest typhoon, damaging 10.8 billion pesos or us $241oin crops, animals and properties.
map of Baguio City
map of Baguio City
tropical storm THELMA or URING in 1991 was considered the most destructive or deadliet for killing 5,101 to 8000 Filipinos who got drowned in its floods.
tropical storm THELMA or URING in 1991 was considered the most destructive or deadliet for killing 5,101 to 8000 Filipinos who got drowned in its floods.
Typhoon Mike / Ruping at its peak approaching the Philippines.  It occurred Nov. 10 to 14, 1990 as the 4th costliest typhoon, damaging 10.8 billion pesos or us $241oin crops, animals and properties.
Typhoon Mike / Ruping at its peak approaching the Philippines. It occurred Nov. 10 to 14, 1990 as the 4th costliest typhoon, damaging 10.8 billion pesos or us $241oin crops, animals and properties.

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Inportant facts about Philippine typhoons

<> Typhoon Pepeng death toll 492, damage to crops and properties P27.195B

THIS morning October 4, 2010 something very important caught my fancy while TV ABS-CBN channel was on. The TV man made mention of the word BAGUIO which- according to him- originated after a typhoon of a very strong intensity hit Baguio City and its environs in the year 1911. He elaborated that from that time on typhoons that hit the Philippine area of responsibility are called Baguio. How true!

I jotted down the facts lest I forgot them. After doing minor chores and a light breakfast, I began the challenging task of delving into the subject matter. All through my 72 years of existence I have used the term Baguio for any weather disturbance without any thought of how the word came to be. My family, neighbors, townmates and I’m pretty sure the entire country is using it in the same vein as what my idea and concept of the word is.

My parents who were born 4 years before the 1911 super typhoon, failed to inform us children why typhoons are called Baguio. Perhaps info dissemination during their times were slow as turtles.

Here are my findings:

The term bagyo, a Tagalog word meaning typhoon arose after a 1911 storm where a record rainfall of 46 inches occurred in the city of Baguio in one 24 hour period. Further, the term refers to any tropical cyclone in the Philippine Islands. Six to 7 tropical cyclones visit the Philippines every year.

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (or PAGASA) a Filipino word which means HOPE and created on December 8, 1972 by virtue of Presidential Decree No. 78, a government agency which is tasked to provide flood and typhoon warnings, public weather forecasts and advisories, categorized BAGYO according to its wind speed into 4 types:

1) Tropical Depressions

2) Tropical Storms

3) Typhoons

4) Super Typhoons

Tropical Depressions have sustained winds of between 55 to 64 kilometers per hour near its center. Tropical Storms, 65 to 119 kilometers per hour near its center; Typhoons, 120 to 185 kilometers per hour and Super Typhoons have maximum winds exceeding 185 kilometers per hour.

Tropical Storm THELMA or Uring in Nov. 2-7, 1991 was considered the most destructive or deadliest for killing 5,101 to 8,000 Filipinos who drowned in its floods. Majority of its drowning victims were residents from Ormoc City. The wettest- meaning there were much rain water- was the July 1911 cyclone as rank No. 1 which dropped over 1,168 millimeters or 46.0 inches of rainfall within a 24 hour period at Baguio City. Ketsana or Ondoy that hit the country on Sept. 23-29, 2009 is ranked No. 3 in the category Costliest with 11 billion-peso damages or 244 million US$. Parma or Pepeng immediately followed suit from Sept. 30 to Oct. 14, 2009. It was ranked No.1 under Category Costliest, leaving in its wake 11 billion-peso or US$ 244 million damages.

Visit the following links: 1) to know the 10 typhoons belonging to each of the following categories: deadliest (destructive, costliest and wettest; 2) source of this hub.


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    • nick071438 profile imageAUTHOR

      nick071438 

      7 years ago from City of Catbalogan, W, Samar, Philippines

      Thanks Mr.Tiosen for your inspiring comment.

    • profile image

      Nicanor P. Tiosen 

      7 years ago

      This is an interesting piece. Yes, all over the Philippines, the word is used for typhoon.

    • nick071438 profile imageAUTHOR

      nick071438 

      7 years ago from City of Catbalogan, W, Samar, Philippines

      Thank you very much, Russell...for your visit and your nice comment as well.

    • RussellLHuey profile image

      RussellLHuey 

      7 years ago

      Yeah, very interesting and fascinating information on this hub, nicko71438. Great job!

    • nick071438 profile imageAUTHOR

      nick071438 

      7 years ago from City of Catbalogan, W, Samar, Philippines

      Meiw, you've presented a very interesting Igorot and Ibalois legends of how BAGUIO, the summer capital of the Philippines, got its name. The material is a good source for readers wanting to know the origin of the City of Baguio (bag-iw local name for moss or mossy flowering plants).

    • profile image

      meiw 

      8 years ago

      My 6th grade teacher said....

      An American was asking an igorot what the name of the place is..

      He points to the ground and says "what is this place called?" The Igorot did not understand english, he looked at what the American was pointing, lumot....so he says bag-iw and the American says...Baguio? And so it was called Baguio from that point on.

      more..

      How then did Baguio get it's name?

      Legend has it that when the Americans reached Kafagway they asked the

      natives for the name of the place and most likely pointed to the soil. Not

      understanding what they were saying, the Ibalois gave the name of the

      mossy flowering plant that covered the ground "bag-iw," which the

      Americans pronounced "bag-i-yo."

    • nick071438 profile imageAUTHOR

      nick071438 

      8 years ago from City of Catbalogan, W, Samar, Philippines

      Thank you DjB ... for dropping by and leaving a nice comment. I went to your profile and find you a wonderful woman charming and oozing with ideas and energy.

    • DjBryle profile image

      DjBryle 

      8 years ago from Somewhere in the LINES of your MIND, and HOPEFULLY at the RIPPLES of your HEART. =)

      The title says it all... this hub is very INTERESTING! Thanks for sharing! =)

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