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Is Cultural Loss a Real Threat?

Updated on August 5, 2017

Almost in every locality, there are signs of changes in the culture. Such places include schools, churches, retail markets, political organizations, economy and even within the family. The changes surpass the expected changes where they proceed to affect people's core beliefs and values. Cases such as advice on people to use protective measures as a way of evading contagious diseases are part of what initially was a taboo to discuss in public. Likewise, even adverts on the internet also seem to promote radical change in culture. For this reason, this hub will seek to evaluate on whether such changes are a threat to the existence of culture.

Change is not an issue, but the repercussion from it that results to death of culture are the serious concerns. Within people's perspectives, the death of culture may either take place through cumulated cultural change effects or major changes on prime institutions within the society. Either the sides of the matter, the resultant outcomes of rapid cultural change may lead to the loss of culture.

Change in culture is within us as much as most people are afraid of it since it advances all over places thus absorbing populations thus leading to the erosion of their beliefs and values. For instance, Salins in his article of Assimilation, American Style says; "Assimilation has from time to time been flexible and also accommodative and as a result leading to attainment of its purpose; that is permitting for the preservation of the national unity of the United States despite the influx of various persons from different cultural backgrounds.” After the erosion of the values, what happens after is the recuperation of remnants of the first culture. However, people tend to assume that it is possible to tolerate the change so long as such changes do lead to harm them. Regardless of this, there are sometimes when such changes overcome the existence of the current culture. Consequently, the presence of cultural change creates doom to the culture.

A change in culture is similar to a deadly virus or bacteria that evade the body of an individual thus leading to the body system of such person being nonfunctional and development of complications in other systems. Social changes, for example, affect the system of culture up to that juncture where they cause drastic reorganization of the society. In the end, these damaging effects cause interference with the operation or functioning of other systems that are rooted deeply in the culture. About the same, the article Assimilation, American Style by Salins, it reiterates; “From the time of independence, most Americans who nearly were all immigrants or their descendants have undergone installation with the assimilationist ethos and in turn have developed in a new generation of immigrants."

In another scenario, culture seems to survive despite the full mode of changes. An example, in this case, is the culture of the Japanese. The life in Tokyo currently remains as it was before despite the encroaching culture of the Western countries. All these happenings may occur because of a combination of factors that constitute a Japanese national either young or old. The same may also signify that life gets passed from one generation to another through their DNA.

As already analyzed in this discussion, it is true that cultural change is under threat especially because of the social environment in place. Yes, it is true, life gets passed from an individual's DNA, and the truth is that social environment overrides it as a result posing a great threat to the change of culture. Hence, the Japans case does not hold. Due to this reason, culture loss is indeed under threat.

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