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IF YOU CAN SPEAK ENGLISH YOU ARE HALFWAY TO SPEAKING ITALIAN

Updated on January 30, 2016

Three Heads are better than One

In Italian you can wear a classical head, a terracotta head, or a pumpkin.
The classical head is il capo, which nowadays seems to have shriveled up in its use and is ready to drop off.
The most-used head is la testa, originally a shell, then a tortoise shell, a terracotta vase, and now a person's head.
Playfully, for a head you can wear la zucca, which is really a pumpkin.

Not at all Handy

It started off as a dark room in which photographs were developed, the camera obscura.
Then the “room” was applied to the actual instrument that took the photographs - the camera.
Now it has been it has been cut down to cam, as in webcam and handycam.
Italian has the cumbersome macchina fotografica, or “photographic machine”.

A Bodyful of Mice

Muscle in Italian is muscolo, from Latin mus, the origin of the English word mouse. In the contractions and vibrations of our muscles in action the Romans somehow saw little mice running up and down our body.

A copy of Michelangelo'David at piazzale Michelangelo - Florence

From a Harrow to a Hearse to Do it Again.

Harrow, is from Latin hirpex, through Old French herse. Italian erpice
Hearse, carriage for carrying a deceased person. The harrow-like frame for the candles placed on a coffin or funeral carriage was subsequently applied to the vehicle itself.
Rehearse, literally to “rake over” again, to repeat

Putting on your Saint when you get up

An old Venetian comic who wore characteristic trousers, was nicknamed San Pantaleone, one of the city's favorite saints at that time. This name was continued in Italian, pantaloni, to mean any type or fit of trousers.
Your pantaloons are now tailored down to pants, and again to panties

The statue of the florentine poet Dante Alighieri

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