ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Marine Corps Museum at Quantico

Updated on August 6, 2019
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Marine Corps Museum, Quantico, VA, August 18, 2007.The Marine Corps Museum, Quantico, VA A post WWI aircraft in The Marine Corps MuseumAn AV-8B Harrier II in The Marine Corps Museuminside The Marine Corps MuseumInside The Marine Corps Museum
The Marine Corps Museum, Quantico, VA, August 18, 2007.
The Marine Corps Museum, Quantico, VA, August 18, 2007. | Source
The Marine Corps Museum, Quantico, VA
The Marine Corps Museum, Quantico, VA | Source
A post WWI aircraft in The Marine Corps Museum
A post WWI aircraft in The Marine Corps Museum | Source
An AV-8B Harrier II in The Marine Corps Museum
An AV-8B Harrier II in The Marine Corps Museum | Source
inside The Marine Corps Museum
inside The Marine Corps Museum | Source
Inside The Marine Corps Museum
Inside The Marine Corps Museum | Source

Museum Past and Present

The National Museum of the Marine Corps is adjacent to the Marine Corps Base Quantico. From 1978 to 2002 there was the Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum inside Marine Base Quantico. This article will cover the current museum and its predecessor. Some of the artifacts are the same. These museums are completely different.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
An armored vehicle outside the Marine Air-Ground Museum A dive bomber inside the Marine Air-Ground MuseumA Soviet made T-61 tank outside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.An F4U Corsair inside the Marine Air-Ground MuseumAn Okha, a Japanese kamikaze plane, inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.  The Americans nick named the aircraft "Baka", the Japanese word for "fool". The nose of a B-25 inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.A Soviet made MiG-15 inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.A Marine Corps bi-plane, inside the Marine Air-Ground MuseumAn F-86 Sabre near the Marine Air-Ground museum, Quantico.An A-4 Skyhawk, near the Marine Air-Ground museum, QuanticoAn F4U Corsair in the Marine Air-Ground museum, A mirror allows for a view inside the cockpit.A diorama of an air ambulence in the Marine Air-ground Mueuem.An F-6F Hellcat in the Marine Air-Ground museum, A World War II staff car  at the Marine Air-Ground museum.A US Navy Trainer, at the Marine Air-Ground museum.Early Marine Corps aircraft  at the Marine Air-Ground museum..Outside storage at Quantico, 1990.A Soviet made T-34 on outside storage at Quantico, 1990.
An armored vehicle outside the Marine Air-Ground Museum
An armored vehicle outside the Marine Air-Ground Museum | Source
A dive bomber inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum
A dive bomber inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum | Source
A Soviet made T-61 tank outside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.
A Soviet made T-61 tank outside the Marine Air-Ground Museum. | Source
An F4U Corsair inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum
An F4U Corsair inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum | Source
An Okha, a Japanese kamikaze plane, inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.  The Americans nick named the aircraft "Baka", the Japanese word for "fool".
An Okha, a Japanese kamikaze plane, inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum. The Americans nick named the aircraft "Baka", the Japanese word for "fool". | Source
The nose of a B-25 inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.
The nose of a B-25 inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum. | Source
A Soviet made MiG-15 inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum.
A Soviet made MiG-15 inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum. | Source
A Marine Corps bi-plane, inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum
A Marine Corps bi-plane, inside the Marine Air-Ground Museum | Source
An F-86 Sabre near the Marine Air-Ground museum, Quantico.
An F-86 Sabre near the Marine Air-Ground museum, Quantico. | Source
An A-4 Skyhawk, near the Marine Air-Ground museum, Quantico
An A-4 Skyhawk, near the Marine Air-Ground museum, Quantico | Source
An F4U Corsair in the Marine Air-Ground museum, A mirror allows for a view inside the cockpit.
An F4U Corsair in the Marine Air-Ground museum, A mirror allows for a view inside the cockpit. | Source
A diorama of an air ambulence in the Marine Air-ground Mueuem.
A diorama of an air ambulence in the Marine Air-ground Mueuem. | Source
An F-6F Hellcat in the Marine Air-Ground museum,
An F-6F Hellcat in the Marine Air-Ground museum, | Source
A World War II staff car  at the Marine Air-Ground museum.
A World War II staff car at the Marine Air-Ground museum. | Source
A US Navy Trainer, at the Marine Air-Ground museum.
A US Navy Trainer, at the Marine Air-Ground museum. | Source
Early Marine Corps aircraft  at the Marine Air-Ground museum..
Early Marine Corps aircraft at the Marine Air-Ground museum.. | Source
Outside storage at Quantico, 1990.
Outside storage at Quantico, 1990. | Source
A Soviet made T-34 on outside storage at Quantico, 1990.
A Soviet made T-34 on outside storage at Quantico, 1990. | Source

The Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum

The museum was a series of Quonset huts. The museum expanded over the years. One hut was for pre-World War II aircraft and ground equipment. Another hut was for World War II aircraft and ground vehicles. It had dioramas of some of the famous World War II battles. A nice feature for some of the aircraft displays was mirrors that gave a cockpit view. It had a small theater that showed documentaries of famous World War II battles.

There was a line of armored vehicles outside the huts. There was a line of 1950s era jet fighters a short walk from the museum. Near the museum there was a storage facility that wasn’t open to the public. In a lot near the museum, but not where visitors would normally go, there were a couple of armored vehicles. One of these vehicles was a T-34[i].


[i] The T-34 was a Soviet medium tank. When deployed it was superior to the German tanks. It rendered many German anti-tank weapons useless. Soviet allied forces used the T-34s into the 1970s.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
A drone at the Marine Corps MuseumAn early machine gun at the Marine Corps MuseumA Stuart tank at the Marine Corps MuseumA piece of the World Trade Center at the Marine Corps MuseumA piece of the Pentagon at the Marine Corps Museum.
A drone at the Marine Corps Museum
A drone at the Marine Corps Museum | Source
An early machine gun at the Marine Corps Museum
An early machine gun at the Marine Corps Museum | Source
A Stuart tank at the Marine Corps Museum
A Stuart tank at the Marine Corps Museum | Source
A piece of the World Trade Center at the Marine Corps Museum
A piece of the World Trade Center at the Marine Corps Museum | Source
A piece of the Pentagon at the Marine Corps Museum.
A piece of the Pentagon at the Marine Corps Museum. | Source

The National Museum of the Marine Corps - Overview

This museum opened on November 10, 2006. It is adding extensions. The last of the exhibit additions, the “Changing Exhibits Gallery”, is scheduled to open in 2024.[i] The extension of the Museum’s roof is at the same angle as the flag pole in Joseph John Rosenthal’s “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” photograph. The Museum has a large parking lot. Parking and admission are free. The museum is open every day except Christmas Day. The hours are 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.[ii]

The Museum has a large rotunda. The walls have some famous statements of Marine heroes. There is a diorama of Marines around a personnel carrier and another diorama of Marines disembarking a helicopter. Vintage Marine aircraft are suspended from the ceiling. There is a staircase that goes up three levels. This affords views of the aircraft from different perspectives.

The section “Making Marines” has a film about contemporary Marine boot camp. It will bring back memories for Marines and give non-Marines a feel for what boot camp is like. There is a “Combat Art Gallery” that has paintings portraying combat scenes from battles involving Marines. There is also a section about the Marine Band. The museum has some immersion exhibits that put visitors in the middle of the scene with the sights and sounds, and in one case the climate. The exhibits are laced with oral histories. There is a restaurant that resembles a Marine dining facility and a gift shop.


[i] National Museum of the Marine Corps, Final Phase – Competing the Circle, https://www.usmcmuseum.com/finalphase.html, last accessed 8/3/2019.

[ii]That’s 0900 to 1700 local for Marines.

This museum opened on November 10, 2006. It is adding extensions. The last of the exhibit additions, the “Changing Exhibits Gallery”, is scheduled to open in 2024.[i] The extension of the Museum’s roof is at the same angle as the flag pole in Joseph John Rosenthal’s “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” photograph. The Museum has a large parking lot. Parking and admission are free. The museum is open every day except Christmas Day. The hours are 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.[ii]

The Museum has a large rotunda. The walls have some famous statements of Marine heroes. There is a diorama of Marines around a personnel carrier and another diorama of Marines disembarking a helicopter. Vintage Marine aircraft are suspended from the ceiling. There is a staircase that goes up three levels. This affords views of the aircraft from different perspectives.

The section “Making Marines” has a film about contemporary Marine boot camp. It will bring back memories for Marines and give non-Marines a feel for what boot camp is like. There is a “Combat Art Gallery” that has paintings portraying combat scenes from battles involving Marines. There is also a section about the Marine Band. The museum has some immersion exhibits that put visitors in the middle of the scene with the sights and sounds, and in one case the climate. The exhibits are laced with oral histories. There is a restaurant that resembles a Marine dining facility and a gift shop.


[i] National Museum of the Marine Corps, Final Phase – Competing the Circle, https://www.usmcmuseum.com/finalphase.html, last accessed 8/3/2019.

[ii] That’s 0900 to 1700 local for Marines.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
An M-26 Pershing tankAn M-4 ShermanMarine Corps Museum, Outside the World War I sectionMarine Corps Museum, an early Marine aircraft.A World War I vehicle at the Marine Corps Museum,A Marine Corps WWII dive bomber at the Marine Corps Museum,
An M-26 Pershing tank
An M-26 Pershing tank | Source
An M-4 Sherman
An M-4 Sherman | Source
Marine Corps Museum, Outside the World War I section
Marine Corps Museum, Outside the World War I section | Source
Marine Corps Museum, an early Marine aircraft.
Marine Corps Museum, an early Marine aircraft. | Source
A World War I vehicle at the Marine Corps Museum,
A World War I vehicle at the Marine Corps Museum, | Source
A Marine Corps WWII dive bomber at the Marine Corps Museum,
A Marine Corps WWII dive bomber at the Marine Corps Museum, | Source

Some of the Sections

The Museum covers Marine participation in conflicts of all sizes. The World War I section has a film depicting a Marine assault on the German lines. It also has a graphic presentation explaining the tactic of walking the artillery up to the enemy lines.

The World War II section covers the major Marine combats. A gallery has a home setting with the radio reporting on the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Iwo Jima section has three immersion exhibits. The first section gives a briefing similar to what Marines might have received while they were on a transport ship headed for Iwo Jima. The next section resembles a landing craft headed for Iwo Jima. The walls show film footage of ships during the Iwo Jima landing. The final section is the exhibit proper. This section includes the flag in John Rosenthal’s “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” photograph. Photography of the flag is prohibited.

The Korean War section has one gallery that is a classroom setting. There is the voice of the teacher explaining about The Cold War. There is a section that covers the Inchon landing. This section has a short narration then shows an image of Marines climbing the seawall. Another gallery shows an M-26 Pershing tank in a Seoul setting.

There is an immersion gallery about the defense of the Toktong Pass. Taking and holding the Pass was essential for the UN Forces to retreat to the coast so they could be evacuated by sea. The Marines held for five days then retreated to the coastal city of Hungnam. There naval forces evacuated them. The exhibit has Marines in firing positions talking about their situation. There is gunfire and artillery sights and sounds. The gallery is relatively cold so some visitors don’t stay too long in the gallery. All visitors should realize it was much colder in the Toktong Pass and the gunfire was real. Other galleries show how Marines lived and fought during the Korean War. This includes life of those captured by the Communist forces.

The Vietnam War section gives the background of U.S. involvement. It highlights the contributions of various Marine forces. It has an exhibit that highlights the battle of Hue City and the siege of Khe Sanh. Is also has a section about the evacuation of Saigon[i], the largest helicopter evacuation in history.

The Museum also covers the ongoing war on terrorism. It has on display pieces of the World Trade Center and The Pentagon. The Museum is now in its final phase of construction. This phase is scheduled to end in 2024. Here is the timeline for the sections’ completion:[ii]

  • 2019 – Legacy Walk
  • 2021 – Historical galleries covering the Corps’ history from 1976 to the present.
  • 2023 – Hall of Valor
  • 2023-24 – Marine Corps Sports Gallery and Hall of Fame
  • 2024 – Inter-wars Gallery (1919-1940)
  • 2024 – Changing Exhibits Gallery


[i] Saigon was renamed Ho Chi Minh City when South Vietnam surrendered.

[ii] USMC Museum, Final Phase – Completing the Circe, https://www.usmcmuseum.com/finalphase.html, last accessed, 8/3/19.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2019 Robert Sacchi

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      4 weeks ago

      Yes, they are probably in the range of the target audience. Thank you for reading and commenting.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 weeks ago from USA

      Thanks for profiling the museum. Although I am within a few hours I’ve never been and my nephews would very likely enjoy this. They range and in age from 6-19. I’m thinking the younger ones would just want to see the vehicles whereas the older ones could also appreciate the history and patriotism.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      5 weeks ago

      Thank you for reading and commenting. It is an extensive museum.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      5 weeks ago from Ontario, Canada

      It's good to recognize the dedication of the marines and to remind us of the work the military does in maintaining peace. I would love to visit this museum.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      5 weeks ago

      Mostly it seems museum are either free or expensive.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      5 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      We have a few museums that are free on certain days of the week or month in the Houston area. Most do have admission fees. A couple of our art museums are free all of the time. Our Fine Arts Museum (except for special exhibits) is free on Thursdays as one example.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      5 weeks ago

      Thank you for reading and commenting.

      Liz Westwood - The Imperial War Museum is well known. I hope you have visited it. I haven't heard of Eden Camp.

      Pamela Oglesby - This Museum is a wonderful place for anyone interested in military history. I hope to add more pictures when things settle down here.

      Peggy Woods - Around this area many museums are free. The Marine Corps Museum is about an hour drive from DC, more if there is traffic and there usually is.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      5 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      It is good that museums like this exist. The fact of there being no admission charge to be able to visit the Marine Corps Museum is really nice. Thanks for your descriptions and photos.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      5 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

      Your pictures are wonderful, and your descriptions really make this museum sound a very worthwhile visit. My husband would absolutely love to visit the museum Thanks for such a great review.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      5 weeks ago from UK

      You have given a very well-illustrated account of the Marone Corps Museum. This is the kind of place my Dad would have loved to visit. In the UK we have the Imperial War Museum in London. We also have Eden Camp in Yorkshire, which I would one day like to visit.

    • Robert Sacchi profile imageAUTHOR

      Robert Sacchi 

      5 weeks ago

      Thank you for reading and commenting. Yes, if your Marine relatives visit the area I'm sure they would love visiting the Museum. Another place for Marines to visit is the Iwo Jima Memorial which is next to Arlington National Cemetery. It's a large monument depicting the Rosenthal photograph.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      6 weeks ago from sunny Florida

      Several members of my family were Marines so I am certain they will enjoy reading this. I think one of my nephews has actually visited there. Very detailed and interesting. Angels are headed your way this evening ps

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)