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My Black and Yellow Argiope Spider

Updated on November 13, 2013

Charlotte the Spider

We, my husband and I named this amazing creature Charlotte after the Spider in the kids book "Charlotte's Web". She did seem wise like the spider in the story. Her web was built among blanket flowers below our satellite dish. This spider is a black and yellow Agriope spider commonly known as the black and yellow garden spider. I generally don't like spiders but found myself visiting the web everyday to see how Charlotte was doing. She grew to be huge. At least in my mind she was huge. Her body was at least 11/2 inches long and with legs she measured nearly three inches.

I took many photographs and also the video below. There was a fly caught in the web and she went about her chores of wrapping the meal for later.

Agriope Spider

This beautiful huge spider lived in the garden for a summer
This beautiful huge spider lived in the garden for a summer | Source

Taking Photos of Insects

I used a Canon camera similar to the one below to take this fantastic photograph. It is easy to use and just look at the way the yellow and black colors pop out from the photo. The settings allow you to get a close up and even a macro photo shot if that is what you are interested in doing. I used a Nikon SL 35mm camera before the evolution of the digital camera. I am still learning how to get exactly what i want. It is much easier to do with a digital than an "old fashion" film camera. Along with no need to wait for developing to see the results of your days shoot the digital camera is by far a much better choice than a film camera.

Spiders, how do you feel ?

Do you think spiders are good ?

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I was lucky enough to have my video camera with me when an insect got caught in the web. I watched in horror and equal amazement as the spider got the grasshopper and wrapped the meal for later. I never saw the area where the web / silk comes from before this event. You can actually see where the web shoots out of the back end of the spiders body. This all happens so quick. I apologize for my shaky film. I was very new to using the camera plus the event I was capturing was not my favorite think to watch.

Argiope Female Orb Spider aka Banana Spider Death Wrap

Facts about Argiope Spider

Some facts about this beautiful yet creepy spider. The more you know about a subject the better you will understand why you should or should not be frightened of it. In the case of this bright and active insect you decide if they are truly as scary as they look.

A well known fact about animals in nature are that when they are brightly colored that is a sign that they are poisonous and should be avoided at all costs. A lesser known fact is that some animals that have bright colors are only to make predators think they are poisonous. In the case of the Argiope Spider the second is true.

  • Found thoughout the world
  • Bright yellow and black
  • Commonly known as black and yellow garden spider or corn spider
  • Called the writing spider hence the name Charlotte like the smart spider in Charlotte's Web
  • ZigZag design down center of web
  • Web is built low to the ground
  • Harmless to humans
  • Capable of eating prey up to twice its size
  • Might bite if grabbed
  • Female is bigger than the male

Silver Agriope Spider

Source

Praying Mantis Knocking at the Door

One more amazing creature that was in the backyard. Actually this interesting insect is on the window of our back doors. I guess it would have been just as happy inside the house as out. The Praying Mantis is seen regularly here in Northeast Pennsylvania. When they mate the female will often bite the head off the male before cannibalizing him. It was thought that this was a normal action done to ensure the final fertilization of the eggs. Now it is thought that this action is done due to being observed in a laboratory setting. The reasons for this behavior other than the female being very hungry is still controversial.

Photo of a Praying Mantis

Praying Mantis / Peeping Tom
Praying Mantis / Peeping Tom | Source

Mantis Question

Have You Ever Seen a Praying Mantis ?

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