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Napoleon and the French Revolution: A Multiple-Choice Quiz and Study Guide

Updated on January 31, 2018
Casey White profile image

Dorothy McKenney is a former newspaper reporter-turned researcher. Her husband, Mike, is a professional landscape/nature photographer.

Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon fought, and led his troops onto and through the battlefields, while on horseback.  His decision-making ability has been historically considered nothing less than phenomenal throughout the French Revolutionary Wars.
Napoleon fought, and led his troops onto and through the battlefields, while on horseback. His decision-making ability has been historically considered nothing less than phenomenal throughout the French Revolutionary Wars.

Summary of the French Revolution

The French Revolution in a nutshell: The majority of the people in France (the commoners) were fed up with the monarchy and the feudal system under which they had been forced to live. As a result, they began revolting and uprooting those institutions which had been in place for hundreds of years. They wanted, quite simply, a better quality of life, freedom, and equality.

King Louis XVI (1754-1793) and his predecessor had brought the country right up to the brink of bankruptcy and the commoners resented the outrageous taxes that had been imposed upon them by the monarchy, while they saw none of the privileges granted to the clergy and nobility. They were politically disregarded and growing increasingly unsettled.

Napoleon I

After the French Revolutionary Wars and a coup against the existing government in France, Napoleon was crowned emperor, displaying skills as a politician as well as a skilled military leader.
After the French Revolutionary Wars and a coup against the existing government in France, Napoleon was crowned emperor, displaying skills as a politician as well as a skilled military leader.

The Commoners Revolt Against the Monarchy

France had been divided into three separate groups, called "estates." The "first estate" consisted of members of the clergy; the "second estate" encompassed all nobility; and the "third estate" included everyone else - the commoners (although even wealthy businessmen and peasants alike were considered to be commoners).

The third estate, which included over 95% of the population, had very few rights, and they were willing to fight in order to see that changes were made, so that's what they did, signaling a beginning to the French Revolution.

The French monarchy ended in August 1792 when an angry mob entered the palace of King Louis XVI. He and his wife were taken to jail and were ultimately beheaded.

Members of the Third Estate "Carried" the Nobility and the Clergy

The commoners in France were tired of "carrying" the clergy and nobility, as is depicted in this drawing.  They finally revolted and demanded that the absolute monarchy be dismantled.
The commoners in France were tired of "carrying" the clergy and nobility, as is depicted in this drawing. They finally revolted and demanded that the absolute monarchy be dismantled.

© 2017 Mike and Dorothy McKenney

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    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      A history lesson that I had to relearn here. Impressive!

    • JP Silva profile image

      Silva 3 months ago from Los Angeles

      LOL - very nice.

    • Casey White profile image
      Author

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 3 months ago from United States

      Thanks Silva! Larger than life, but shorter than most...lol.

    • JP Silva profile image

      Silva 3 months ago from Los Angeles

      Napoleon fascinates me. I studied him in High School. One of history’s larger than life character.

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