ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Psychoanalytic Theory Of Sigmund Freud

Updated on February 8, 2014

Who Was Sigmund Freud?

If you’ve ever heard of a freudian slip then you are probably familiar with Sigmund Freud himself. A bit of an eccentric in his time, Sigmund Freud was born on May 6, 1856 in Freiberg, Moravia which is now known as the Czech Republic. Sigmund Freud started his career as an Austrian neurologist and eventually went on to become the founding father of psychoanalysis.

What Is Psychoanalysis?

Psychoanalysis is the theory of human mental development and how the mind works. Using a combined set of psychological theories and techniques patients can work on behavior patterns stemming from childhood experiences. These behaviors are traced back to unconscious thoughts and repressed emotions. By getting to the root of these thoughts and emotions, patients are able to become conscious of their unconscious thoughts and then begin resolving their issues.

So What Is a Freudian Slip You Say?

By definition from the online Merriam-Webster Dictionary, A Freudian slip is “a mistake in speech that shows what the speaker is truly thinking.” Some people refer to this as a slip of the tongue if you will. A few examples could be calling someones wife “Mom” or saying “I’m mad that you’re here” instead of “I’m glad that you’re here”. It is said that these errors in speech reveal ones repressed thoughts and feelings. This could be caused by several triggers buried in the unconscious mind such as inner conflicts, mixed emotions or the super ego.

Sigmund Freud Psychoanalytic Approach

There is no doubt that Sigmund Freud was one of the most controversial thinkers of the twentieth century. He brought a broad range of subjects to the table including religion, dreams, sex, women, and culture. His work played a big role in establishing our views on human behavior, personality, childhood experiences, sexuality and theories about the unconscious mind including the role of denial, repression and sublimation.

While Freud’s theories have not been accepted by all mainstream psychology, his work helped to form the building blocks of modern psychology today with many modifications done thereafter. Freud was the first to use hypnotherapy but soon abandoned its techniques deeming it unnecessary. He later created “the therapy couch” in which patients would lay on a comfortable couch and ramble on about whatever came to their minds while the therapist sat closely by asking questions and taking notes.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Sandyspider profile image

      Sandy Mertens 3 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

      I believe there were some good theories of Freud. Others were just crazy. No pun intended.

    • Anthony Moreau profile image
      Author

      Richard de Mey 3 years ago from Scottsdale, Arizona

      his eccentric personality and left field ideas made him difficult for some people to understand or take seriously, however many did find his theories important and valuable enough to use in modern day psychology.

    • profile image

      tabita gohar 2 years ago

      I understand wotever he said or did for psychological approach, did good work as well!!

    • Anthony Moreau profile image
      Author

      Richard de Mey 2 years ago from Scottsdale, Arizona

      yes he was an eccentric genius for sure and he opened the doors to new discoveries in psychology.

    • profile image

      Nick Malae 2 years ago

      Thanks! Got good info for a school project.

    • profile image

      mishy 2 years ago

      diz Freudian information vry useful to my presentation @ skul I like it

    • Anthony Moreau profile image
      Author

      Richard de Mey 2 years ago from Scottsdale, Arizona

      Thanks everyone for commenting on my post and I'm glad you found the information useful.

    • profile image

      gago puta 2 years ago

      If you’ve ever heard of a freudian slip then you are probably familiar with Sigmund Freud himself. A bit of an eccentric in his time, Sigmund Freud was born on May 6, 1856 in Freiberg, Moravia which is now known as the Czech Republic. Sigmund Freud started his career as an Austrian neurologist and eventually went on to become the founding father of psychoanalysis.

      What Is Psychoanalysis?

      Psychoanalysis is the theory of human mental development and how the mind works. Using a combined set of psychological theories and techniques patients can work on behavior patterns stemming from childhood experiences. These behaviors are traced back to unconscious thoughts and repressed emotions. By getting to the root of these thoughts and emotions, patients are able to become conscious of their unconscious thoughts and then begin resolving their issues.

      So What Is a Freudian Slip You Say?

      By definition from the online Merriam-Webster Dictionary, A Freudian slip is “a mistake in speech that shows what the speaker is truly thinking.” Some people refer to this as a slip of the tongue if you will. A few examples could be calling someones wife “Mom” or saying “I’m mad that you’re here” instead of “I’m glad that you’re here”. It is said that these errors in speech reveal ones repressed thoughts and feelings. This could be caused by several triggers buried in the unconscious mind such as inner conflicts, mixed emotions or the super ego.

      Sigmund Freud Psychoanalytic Approach

      There is no doubt that Sigmund Freud was one of the most controversial thinkers of the twentieth century. He brought a broad range of subjects to the table including religion, dreams, sex, women, and culture. His work played a big role in establishing our views on human behavior, personality, childhood experiences, sexuality and theories about the unconscious mind including the role of denial, repression and sublimation.

      While Freud’s theories have not been accepted by all mainstream psychology, his work helped to form the building blocks of modern psychology today with many modifications done thereafter. Freud was the first to use hypnotherapy but soon abandoned its techniques deeming it unnecessary. He later created “the therapy couch” in which patients would lay on a comfortable couch and ramble on about whatever came to their minds while the therapist sat closely by asking questions and taking notes.

    Click to Rate This Article