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Selflessness: A True Beginning to Society and Culture

Updated on February 22, 2012

What Is Selflessness?

To be selfless one might say is impossible, while another says it is completely logical to see the moral longevity in the process of successful selflessness. The concept of Self VS. Selfless brings attributes that serve as both pros and cons depending on the circumstances. For example, if one were to stay up all hours of the night waiting on a significant other to make a call that never happened, then on one hand you could be selfless and continue to wait, but due to emotional distress from being outside of yourself for others, causes emotional stress on ones heart. On the other side of the coin, one could presume a selfish nature and pursue a revengeful resolution, thereby shatter selflessness for a gain of self.

So the Purpose Is?

The purpose of Selflessness lies not within the individual, but in the way others perceive the individual's behaviors. It is almost certain that if a form of behavior suited to the morals of traditional culture, whereas principles of family and preservation of another's wellbeing, then the concept of Selflessness. When viewing the terms of the conceptual image of Self, there is the major factor of following the myth of Capitalism, or the pursuing of one's own individual gain over the insanity and dragging of another. When trying to find a balance of Self and Selflessness, one finds that one cannot be pursued without trailing the other behind, but both are needed for a healthy individual.

The Interconnection between Well Being and Selflessness

Now lets take a look at concepts of wellbeing and how it relates to Selflessness. A couple physical attributes that pertain to being selfless is to always try to say or do the right thing, and to always try to eat in moderation, a task not easily tackled. The mental structuring of Selflessness is the allocation of negative attitudes about others that are neutralized, in effect allowing for an overall sense of complacency knowing you as an individual has done the right thing. On a social level, being selfless allows for a greater understanding from others knowing your performing selfless deeds for them, that your moral grandeur gives others the right path to look upon; whether or not they take it is completely up to the individual.

Selflessness and Society

After looking at all the area of individual selflessness, let's take a closer look at the values of the concept in society. To be rather blunt, the overall populations of the western hemisphere practice forms of Mercantilism, or as Socrates would have said, "Living the Good Life." This of course is not what he wished for society, rather he wanted a balance of virtues, that is to allow selflessness flourish without the breakdown of emotional values that would pertain to the conscious withdraw from the individual. In the Eastern parts of the world, there is sense of traditional culture, that is that the family is collectively displayed as the number one priority over self gained values and assets, although in the west, some political figures find this weak and irrelevant to a productive society.

A Vague Conclusion

Therefore, we must ask ourselves not which part of the world to live in, or if one concept matters strongly over another, but whether selflessness is right at the particular moment or time. It is very keen to observe various individuals from different parts of the world that have changed lives simply by helping build a water well in Africa, or giving canned food to survivors of earthquakes in Turkey. Along all boundaries of every country in this world we call home, there are people that wish for help, and in a sense, would that be considered selfishness, that in another's eyes, ten people might need the dire help over the one. Selflessness and Selfishness must be taken hand in hand, and after picking apart the differences, it is important to find the good and decent within every individual, rather than placing within one category or the other before looking at the entire personality.

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    • BakerRambles profile imageAUTHOR

      BakerRambles 

      7 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      I'm glad you think highly of the Dali. I think just some people give that light worth holding onto to affirmative morals. He was a one of a kind individual, and selflessness was the front lines in the way he spoke and talked in conversation.

    • raciniwa profile image

      raciniwa 

      7 years ago from Naga City, Cebu

      Well, i am always awed by the Dalai Lama...and you have a great way of presenting this...

    • BakerRambles profile imageAUTHOR

      BakerRambles 

      7 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      Your welcome greenheart, thank you for reading!

    • Greenheart profile image

      Greenheart 

      7 years ago from Cambridge

      Thanks for your hub!

    • BakerRambles profile imageAUTHOR

      BakerRambles 

      7 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      Thank you mc, and your right; one must always strive to find a balance or fail completely in trying to promote pure selflessness. It is in self reflection that a motive with both an idealistic solution to a problem can be found, or the opposite can happen, ego with a revengeful motive to promote ones own self image.

    • profile image

      mcals71 

      7 years ago

      Ego is a serpent with many heads. As soon as you cut one off, another grows back. We must beware of the Ego, which is the source of self complacency and delusion. One can only hope to be truly selfless in one's motivations, but then self-reflection is also the work of Ego. Always doing the most loving thing without ulterior motives, whatever the cost, and forgetting about it right away (not looking for results) helps someone to grow in selfless behavior. I find this article to be good food for thought because it touches, though indirectly, on the reality of the fact that if we don't love ourselves (don't know what love is), we can't possibly love others, hence the necessity of a balanced degree of self and selflessness. The challenge lays in striking the right balance. Voted up, useful and interesting.

    • BakerRambles profile imageAUTHOR

      BakerRambles 

      7 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      Thank you real housewife, it is interesting to see how a society can take a degree of selflessness and run with it, creating s cycle almost. It is also so that a fraction of selflessness can be seen as ulterior for another sneakier action.

    • RealHousewife profile image

      Kelly Umphenour 

      7 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      Really thought provoking. It is very interesting to me to think of how one small gesture of selflessness could be a tiny thing that might change the action of another person and another and another. There is a lot to think about here.

      Up and excellent. Nice work!

    • BakerRambles profile imageAUTHOR

      BakerRambles 

      7 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      Thank you very much miss olive, I really appreciate your feedback. It is all too often that individuals refute others based on selfless acts, and I felt like this article was needed to place everything in perspective. Thank you and I hope your article goes well.

    • missolive profile image

      Marisa Hammond Olivares 

      7 years ago from Texas

      Very nicely done. Lots of food for thought in this hub. I'm going to bookmark this for continued reflection. I like how you included the videos and references to Socrates. Finding the right balance between selflessness, perspective and self care has always been something I like to analyze. You mentioned the allocation of negative attitudes and creating a sense of complacency. Acceptance and acknowledgement is very important in this process. Finding that balance and not tipping toward either desensitization or selfishness is a battle I frequently see. Society has shown many interesting faces. Sadly, some question selfless acts as a lure for ulterior motives. It is then that we must remain complacent, but aware.

      I've been working on a piece about perspective and reflection. You hub has inspired me to continue its completion. I'd like to link to this hub when I publish it.

      Great hub - voted up

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