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Some Thoughts on Time

Updated on August 19, 2012

Quotes describing time

There are innumerable sayings and lyrics on the topic of time let me recall a few of them here:

  1. Time waits for no one, it passes you by, and it rolls on forever, like a cloud in the sky!

  2. Time is money

  3. Time is the greatest healer of all wounds

You may like to add many more such epigrams to the above quotes. What is noteworthy is that these are universally appreciated as true even when we may not be practicing what we are preaching thereby!

Why there is seven days in a week?

It is also an established fact that despite so many diverse cultures, isms and pronouncements from widely and wildly differing communities, we are all in perfect agreement as far as our basic concepts of measurement of time are concerned. The months and seasons are based on either solar or lunar movements. But how have we arrived at a commonly agreed seven days’ week and 24(12 X 2) hours’ day? And why is there no second opinion about a week’s duration wherever you go or whatever you profess? In other words, time is a universally binding and unifying force of nature ordained by Allah himself.

Thanks to London

It is also gratifying that everybody universally accepted the central theme or Greenwich Time. All the nations’ local standard time, although necessarily based on their own respective longitudes determining important landmarks of sunrise & sunset, are however always related to the commonly agreed Greenwich time based on the universally accepted zero degree longitude passing through Greenwich situated in the united kingdom. Without this universally agreed time element, we would have been faced with a lot of confusion especially in this age of air travel.

From Pole to Pole, the Prime Meridian covers a distance of 20,000 km. In the Northern Hemisphere it passes through UK, France and Spain in Europe and Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo and Ghana in Africa. The land mass crossed by the Meridian in the
From Pole to Pole, the Prime Meridian covers a distance of 20,000 km. In the Northern Hemisphere it passes through UK, France and Spain in Europe and Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo and Ghana in Africa. The land mass crossed by the Meridian in the

A technique for Indians

Indian standard time is exactly five and half hours ahead of London Greenwich time, turning upside down your Indian standard time showing wristwatch, thereby rotating your watch 180 degrees [and converting hour indicator 12 into 6 and 6 into 12; 3 into 9 and 9 into 3 ! ], you automatically get to show the corresponding Greenwich time! So you don’t have to adjust your wristwatch time at all to get to the London time. If wristwatch only bears hourly marks without any numbers printed on the diaphragm it suits very well for Indians to read the Greenwich Time without any problem.

Relating time with The Relativity

Full comprehension about anything in our universe is not complete until you relate it to the time dimension in addition to the usual three dimensions which we are accustomed to. And then there is the famous time relativity theory expounded by Albert Einstein. As part of this exposition, if you are stationed somewhere far, far , far out in the space beyond, then the minutest time you spend there will be equivalent to the corresponding time span of hundreds of years on earth! That is because the earth’s time is measured in terms of its own 24 hours orbit, the circumference of which is insignificantly small as compared with the gigantic and almost immeasurably large revolutionary orbit at that far away point in space. Thus scientifically our worldly life span is as short as a wink compared to and that we must therefore utilize it as much as possible in good deeds, without wasting a single breath of ours or without waiting for a more opportune time.

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