ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Education and Science»
  • Foreign Languages

Spanish Lesson Sixty-Three: The Five Senses

Updated on February 22, 2016

Good Afternoon Readers!

How'd you like last week's lesson? Yeah, I know... it was fairly short. I've been trying my best to make these lessons as simple as possible as we get closer and close to the end of them. Number one hundred will be last lesson for Spanish. I'm thinking of doing a new language like Portuguese or maybe Italian? Either way, we'll keep learning languages together for a long time. Anyhow, thanks for reading and I hope you enjoy this week's lesson. If you've had trouble describing the things you felt, saw, heart, smelled, or tasted, here's the lesson for you.

Thanks for reading and enjoy this lesson!!

Objectives

  • To Discuss the five senses in Spanish
  • To Learn and Familiarize oneself with new vocabulary
  • To Be Able to leverage new skills learned in today's lesson.

Do You Know How To Say "To Touch" in Spanish?

See results

The Five Senses in Spanish

Hey Readers

Thanks for coming out for this lesson. As you know, we have five sense. To hear, to touch, to smell, to see, and to taste. This lesson is based off of those senses. I figure these are pretty important to describe when you're talking to other people. You can tell someone about your trip or about an event that occurred around you. There are always sights and sounds and things that need to be described. So below, there are five verbs that I've researched that can serve the purposes of this lesson. There are several rules that should be followed, of course. Don't worry, I'll explain those in a moment. So take a look at the vocabulary section and then down to the lesson for more information. Thanks for reading and I'll see you at the lecture hall.

English Word
Spanish Equiv
To Smell
Oler
To Touch
Tocar
To See
Mirar
To Hear
Oír
To Taste
Degustar
Bell
El Timbre
Alarm
La Alarma
Odor
El Olor
Festival
El Festival
TV Show
El Programa de Television
Beer
La Cerveza
Hair
El Pelo

Today's Vocabulary

Hey Readers!

Thanks for continuing to support these lessons. Altogether, these lessons take up more than fifty percent of my total readership. Thanks so much!

So today I have some new vocabulary for you that should help you with this lessons. These are things that you can see, taste, touch, smell, and hear. If you've ever wanted to learn how to say anything that is not in these lessons, take a moment and look it up. There are generally two to three words to describe an object. Think about it in the sense that English has multiple words for the same things. So anyway, take a look at this vocabulary and meet me down in the lecture portion of the lesson. We're going to learn quite a bit today.

Present Indicative

Verb
Yo
Él/Ella/Usted
Nosotros
Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes
Oler
Huelo
Hueles
Huele
Olemos
Huelen
Tocar
Toco
Tocas
Toca
Tocamos
Tocan
Mirar
Miro
Miras
Mira
Miramos
Miran
Oír
Oigo
Oyes
Oye
Oímos
Oyen
Degustar
Degusto
Degustas
Degusta
Degustamos
Degustan

Preterit

Verb
Yo
Él/Ellas/Usted
Nosotros
Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes
Oler
Olí
Oliste
Olío
Olimos
Olieron
Tocar
Toqué
Tocaste
Tocó
Tocamos
Tocaron
Mirar
Miré
Miraste
Miró
Miramos
Miraron
Oír
Oiste
Oyó
Oímos
Oyeron
Degustar
Degusté
Degustaste
Degustó
Degustamos
Degustaron

Indicative Imperfect

Verb
Yo
Él/Ella/Usted
Nosotros
Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes
Oler
Olía
Olías
Olía
Olíamos
Olían
Tocar
Tocaba
Tocabas
Tocaba
Tocábamos
Tocaban
Mirar
Miraba
Mirabas
Miraba
Mirábamos
Miraban
Oír
Oía
Oías
Oía
Oíamos
Oían
Degustar
Degustaba
Degustabas
Degustaba
Degustábamos
Degustaban

Ver Vs. Mirar

Ver

  • To indicate simple act of seeing
  • To anticipate an outcome
  • To Indicate an understanding
  • To Refer to a visit

Mirar

  • To indicate deliberate seeing
  • To indicate orientation of something


Discussing The Five Senses in Spanish

We're finally here, readers! Come now, let's learn how to discuss these topics in Spanish. Let's go in order and see how well our review goes. Remember, follow the rules exactly in order to maintain integrity. Spanish is a tricky language just like English. Sometimes you could say one thing and another is interpreted. So make sure you're careful. Let's go over each verb carefully.


Puedo oler la gasolina. I can smell the gasoline. Use Oler just like any other verb when describing something you smelled.

La casa huele a gasolina. The house smells like gasoline. Use Oler followed by "a" to describe what something smells like. Oler can also be used in a figurative sense just like in English. Also you can use it worded like something appears to be or seems to be. This can be achieved by using an I.O.P.

The Huele que la casa es vieja. It seems to you that the house is old. This can also be achieved by using the reflexive form as well.


Toque la cabeza de la girafa. I touched the giraffe's head. Tocar is used to specifically mean "to touch". It can also mean "to touch on" like a topic for a paper. Also, the verb tocar can be mean "to play" as in an instrument or similar device.

Puede tocar la guitarra. He can play the guitar.


Estoy mirando la television. I am watching the television. Mirar is used more commonly to discuss something you're deliberately seeing or watching. While Ver refers to a more indirect form of seeing. I chose mirar for its lack of commonality. Let's try Ver.

The vi en la escuela. I saw you in the school. Ver is more indirect in the seeing of someone.

The miré en la escuela. I watched you in the school. Can you tell the difference? You can find conjugations for Ver online.


Oigo la alarma. I hear the alarm. Oír is irregular in some instances. Take note of the charts provided in this lesson. Oír literally means "to hear" and can be used to describe something someone heard.

Oye... Listen... The subjunctive form of Oír can be used to ask someone to listen to something you're saying.

Oi a los pájaros cantando. I heard the birds singing. When referring to animals or people, Oír must be followed by a personal "a". Make sure you remember this rule.


Degustaste el pollo anoche. You tasted the chicken last night. Degustar means "to taste" in a matter of speaking. There are several ways to express this sense. The use of saber can be used as well. For conjugation notes on that verb, check online or other Spanish lessons.

El pollo sabe a pavor. The chicken tastes like turnkey. Saber + a can indicate what something tastes like.

El pollo sabe mal. The Chicken tastes bad. Saber alone can indicate how something tastes.

El pollo tiene un sabor de polvo. The chicken tastes like dust. The final way to describe taste would be by saying something has a flavor of something. Sabor means "flavor".


Note: There are multiple routes to take for several of these words and if more ways are found, please feel free to share.

Thanks so much for reading this week! It's been an interesting lesson. So thanks! Oh! Next week we're going to discuss the Participles. Come on back for that one!

© 2013 A.E. Williams

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Mandilynn 15 months ago

      I noticed that there's constantly the word "the" before certain sentences, and I am trying to figure out if it is supposed to be "te" or another word entirely. I can't figure it out!

    • profile image

      Ricardo 2 years ago

      Al utilizar "La Programa de Televisión", se está conjugando mal el genero de la expresión ya que "La Programa" suena femenino , en español, la combinación "Programa de" es masculino, por lo tanto corresponde conjugar "El programa de televisión..." As TV Show.

    • profile image

      Adelie 3 years ago

      One or two to remmrbee, that is.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)