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Summer Slides into Autumn -a Visual Guide

Updated on August 6, 2015

Notes from a Lancashire Countryman.

Here in Lancashire,situated in the North West of England, meadows are alive with the spirit of life, as are the hedgerows, scrub land and other habitats. The landscape of Lancashire is continually changing, almost on a daily basis. Some of the changes are conspicuous such as the large white trumpet-like flowers of the hedge bindweed, which now adorn many hedgerows.

Hedge bindweed

The large flowers of hedge bindweed make them unmistakeable. Photograph by D.A.L.
The large flowers of hedge bindweed make them unmistakeable. Photograph by D.A.L.

Large flower

These plants produce the largest single flower of any native wild flora. Should the moon be bright enough the flowers will stay open throughout the night attracting long tongued moths and many other crawling insects to the beautiful blooms.

Gardeners however, do not take kindly to this species invading their cultivated kingdoms for the species is hard to eradicate.

Trumpet flowers

The trumpet flowers will remain open throughout the night should the moon be bright enough. Photograph by D.A.L.
The trumpet flowers will remain open throughout the night should the moon be bright enough. Photograph by D.A.L.

Other changes

Other changes are more subtle, needing a greater sense of observation to detect, such as the tiny acorns developing on the twig of the mighty oak. The fruits of hawthorn beginning to sewll. Sloe berries are forming clad in their green coats, which by autumn will have taken on the purple misty colour of their cultivated relatives the plum.

The beautiful bells of the foxglove have achieved their purpose of attracting bees to their spotted inner sanctum. They now fall in succession quickly replaced by swollen seed vessels which are a result of perfect pollination.

Yet other late summer plants will take their place in plant land, such as the yarrow, sneezewort, hemp nettle,selfheal, red bartsia, and angelica to mane but a few. Others such as the clovers continue to flower in profusion as the season marches onwards to the height of summers glory.

Gallery of sightings

The green fruit of hawthorn swells before turning red by autumn.Photograph by D.A.L.
The green fruit of hawthorn swells before turning red by autumn.Photograph by D.A.L.
The first signs of the tiny acorns forming on the mighty oak.Photograph by D.A.L.
The first signs of the tiny acorns forming on the mighty oak.Photograph by D.A.L.
This oak apple gall has been home to the developing grub of a wasp.As we can see the adult wasp has now emerged leaving the tell tale hole in the side of the structure. Photograph by D.A.L.
This oak apple gall has been home to the developing grub of a wasp.As we can see the adult wasp has now emerged leaving the tell tale hole in the side of the structure. Photograph by D.A.L.
The green fruits of the blackthorn-known as sloe berries will turn a misty blue by autumn. Photograph by D.A.L.
The green fruits of the blackthorn-known as sloe berries will turn a misty blue by autumn. Photograph by D.A.L.
This fledgling great tit  seems vulnerable but its attentive parents are close by. Photograph by D.A.L.
This fledgling great tit seems vulnerable but its attentive parents are close by. Photograph by D.A.L.

Gallery two sightings

Skipper butterfly on cat's ear a dandelion like plant of the daisy family.Photograph by D.A.L.
Skipper butterfly on cat's ear a dandelion like plant of the daisy family.Photograph by D.A.L.
The evening primrose is about to sport its yellow blooms. Photograph by D.A.L.
The evening primrose is about to sport its yellow blooms. Photograph by D.A.L.
 The saucer like flowers of the greater willowherb adorn stream sides and other damp localities.Photograph by D.A.L.
The saucer like flowers of the greater willowherb adorn stream sides and other damp localities.Photograph by D.A.L.
The parasitic red bartsia adorns grassland where it takes nourishment from the roots of grasses Photograph by D.A.L.
The parasitic red bartsia adorns grassland where it takes nourishment from the roots of grasses Photograph by D.A.L.
The red flower buds of this cultivated yarrow are almost ready to open. The wild yarrow sports white flowers.Photograph by D.A.L.
The red flower buds of this cultivated yarrow are almost ready to open. The wild yarrow sports white flowers.Photograph by D.A.L.
The tall stems of mugwort becoming prominent. Photograph by D.A.L.
The tall stems of mugwort becoming prominent. Photograph by D.A.L.
Photograph by D.A.L.
Photograph by D.A.L.

Thank you

Thank you for reading hope you enjoyed the visual guide.

Comments

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    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      8 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi Carol, your welcome for the walk. The bind weed can be a persistent weed which is disliked by gardeners. Yet in the wild hedgerows its large flowers are indeed lovely to look at, and are sometimes called morning glory by country folk.

    • reddog1027 profile image

      reddog1027 

      8 years ago from Atlanta, GA

      Thanks for taking me on another great tour of your English countryside. I learned something on our walk today. In England the binder weed is a beautiful wild flower while here in the US, it is considered a noxious weed.

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      8 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi,suny51, nice to hear from you. Thank you for your kind comments. Appreciated. Best wishes.

      Equealla, hello my friend. Glad the hub made you feel warmer. Hope you can do the same for me when our winter begins and your summer commences. Thank you.

    • equealla profile image

      equealla 

      8 years ago from Pretoria, South Africa

      In my winter here down south, you have given me a moment of your summer, and suddenly it was not so cold anymore.

    • suny51 profile image

      suny51 

      8 years ago

      Informative and beautiful,we too have a grass that came with imported wheat in 60s and spreads too fast and takes lots of effort to destroy it.All of your photographs are great.Nice job.

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      8 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi,SilverGenes, Like you I have only heard about it being used for toothache and I am not sure how effective it was. Thank you for your kind and appreciated comments.

    • profile image

      SilverGenes 

      8 years ago

      I enjoyed this very much. The red bartsia is one that was accidentally introduced in our area in the '50s and is still cause for concern for farmers who are growing hay. I looked it up and could only find a bit about it being used for toothache at one time. Do you know if it's used for anything else?

      This was a lovely stroll through the summer countryside! Thank you :)

    • D.A.L. profile imageAUTHOR

      Dave 

      8 years ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi timorous, they are indeed similar in form and a little larger than the Lavertera. The hub sounds a great idea and flowers from that period may be interesting to take a look at. Look forward to seeing it. Thank s for visiting. Best wishes.

    • timorous profile image

      Tim Nichol 

      8 years ago from Me to You

      Hey D.A.L. Fabulous pictures. The bindweed looks interesting. How big are the flowers, actually? They look similar to the flowering lavatera, an annual which I grow every year, from the seeds I harvested from the previous fall.

      I also recall another nocturnal bloomer called 'datura'. Huge flowers, and very strong scent as I recall.

      The evening primrose you show has a very different growth than the evening primrose I grow here. Mine is more of a sprawling habit.

      Maybe I should make a hub of the fine pictures I took of my late mother's garden a few years back.

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