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Technology-Mediated Lesson Plans in Teaching Motion

Updated on October 31, 2014
Teaching is engaging, if a teacher know how to connect with his students' interest.
Teaching is engaging, if a teacher know how to connect with his students' interest. | Source

Overview of the Technology-Mediated Lessons

Learning science can be fun and exciting if pupils are provided with the most conducive and stimulating climate for developing their competence in terms of concepts, skills, attitude in science and technology wherein science learning progresses to self-directed and independent learning. The Development of Technology Mediated Lessons in teaching Motion provides opportunities for children to do what they want to do—explore, think, talk, share, and play! It gives them the chance to discover that the world is full of wonderful things.

For smooth teaching-learning process, teacher plans and develops lesson well.
For smooth teaching-learning process, teacher plans and develops lesson well. | Source

Development of the Technology-Mediated Lessons

The development of the technology mediated lessons is guided by the lesson format established as the instructional design for the use technology oriented lesson based on Gagne’s Nine Levels of Learning. The lesson format contained the following parts: I. Subject Matter or Topic- the main topic of the lesson; II. Period or time schedule- the class schedule and venue of learning; III. Overview- the synopsis of the entire instruction intended for the topic and purpose of the technology mediated lesson; IV. Objectives- the general and specific objectives of the lesson; V. Material and technology- the resource material for the lesson; VI. Procedure- the steps of instruction; VII. Generalization- unifying concept of the lesson and VIII. Assessment/Follow Up Activities/Evaluation- the gathering of evidence of student performance over a period of time to measure learning and understanding; IX. Assignment-arouse the pupils’ interest to dig and find out more about the lesson and embrace the concepts of the next lesson.

Lessons in motion are considered difficult topics since these require deep analysis and careful computation. Interesting tools and strategies are needed to help students learn the lessons without apprehension.
Lessons in motion are considered difficult topics since these require deep analysis and careful computation. Interesting tools and strategies are needed to help students learn the lessons without apprehension. | Source

Technology-Mediated Lessons in Motion: Sub-topics

The technology mediated lessons in motion is an alternate mode of delivery, another tool in the instructor’s toolbox, and should be held to the same standards as any other delivery method. The lessons are presented in the teacher-led demonstration for discovery and group activity to provide the pupils a means to simulate, manipulate, investigate and apply the concepts learned. The topics included in this Technology Mediated lessons are: 1) Force and Motion; 2) Gravity; 3) Friction; 4) Speed; 5) Velocity; 6) Law of Inertia; 7) Law of Acceleration and; 8) Law of Interaction.

Technology-Mediated Lessons in Motion: Teachers' Guide

To further equip, facilitate and nurture the pupils’ learning, the following teachers’ guide are designed for easy reference:

1. Comprehend the stated objectives in each lesson.

2. Consider the time schedule or duration of each lesson.

3. Examine the flow of the activities and the materials to be used in each lesson.

4. Software applications or programs needed in the conduct of the study must be

installed to every computer or device.

5. Determine the pupils’ computer literacy and manipulative skills of the

technologies to be used in each lesson.

6. Choose the conducive and right venue for the activity or teaching-learning

procedure.

7. Inform and share with colleagues, administrators and curriculum

developers the outcome of the technology mediated lessons.

More about Free Falling Objects

Why study the motion of freely falling bodies? To find the answer, click the hyperlink.

Balanced and Unbalanced Forces

Lesson Plan for Force and Motion

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Force and Motion

II. Period/Time Schedule :

III. Overview

Motion is defined as a change in position in relation to a reference point. But it is not easy to tell when an object has changed position. One thing has moved because its position has changed in relation to a stationary object. The stationary object is a fixed object. The fixed object is called the reference point. The fixed object may be a post, a building, a fence, or any stationary object.

Force is a push or a pull. When the forces acting on an object are not balanced or unbalanced, motion takes place in the direction of the greater force. When balanced forces are acting on an object there is no motion.

IV. Objective

1. Operationally define force and motion.

2. Describe objects in motion

3. Identify the factors affecting motion.

4. Compare and contrast balanced and unbalanced forces.

5. use one’s force righteously.

V. Material and Technology

  • Computer units with internet connection and MS Powerpoint Presentation
  • Multimedia projector
  • Laptop
  • Whiteboard
  • Improvised signboard with light
  • Thread
  • (2) Empty cans
  • 1/8 cardboard
  • Toy car/truck
  • (5) Science books
  • Letters (FORCE and MOTION)

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set

● Let the pupils form the word MOTION from the letters scattered in the room. Ask them

to post their answer on the lighted signboard.

●Using Microsoft Powerpoint Presentation present set of clip arts (gif file). Let the

pupils describe each image.

B. Content Presentation

● Ask the pupils to perform the simple activity below.

Problems:

1) What is needed to move an object?

2) Is it easier to quickly start an object moving or to do it slowly?

Predictions:

1) An object needs ________ to move.

2) It is easier to ________ the object moving than to ________ it

moving.

Procedure:

1) Tie the thread around the heavy books.

2) Rest the wooden board across the empty cans and put the books on top.

3) Gently pull the thread. How do the books move?

4) Now keep the thread slack then give it a really hard tug. What happens to the thread?

5) Put the books on the front of the toy truck and pull the truck

along. Pull the truck in order to start it. Pull the truck to keep it going. In which case do you exert more force?

Observations:

1) An object needs ________ to move.

2) It is easier to ________ the object moving than to ________ it

moving.

Questions:

1) How would you describe the motion of the books when you

pulled the thread slowly?

2) How would you describe the motion of the books when you pulled/tugged the thread really hard?

3) How would you compare the force you exerted to make the toy

truck start moving with the force you exerted to keep it moving?

Conclusion:

______________________________________________________________

● Discuss the result of the activity.

● Based from the activity, ask the pupils to define force and motion.

● In discussing the lesson about forces and motion, utilize the slides prepared in MS Powerpoint Presentation.

VII. Generalization

Summarize all the concepts learned.

◘ What is force? Motion?

◘ How do you know if there is motion?

◘ How would you describe motion?

◘ What causes objects to move?

◘ How will you compare and contrast balanced from unbalanced forces?

◘ In daily life, how will you use your force? What will happen if force is not properly

use?

VIII. Assessment

●Let the pupils perform the web interactive activity on

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/scienceclips/ages/6_7/forces_movement.shtml.

IX. Assignment

Read the situation and answer the questions that follow:

The children are playing tug-of-war. Each team wants to win the game. They grip the rope tightly and pull it with much force. At first, no one seems to move. Then, both teams moved back and forth for a few minutes. Finally, with all their might, the children in one team pulled the other team across the line.

Questions:

1.) Why did the other team loss?

2.) What helped the winning team?

This shows balanced and unbalanced forces.
This shows balanced and unbalanced forces. | Source
Video recorder is used to document the pupils' activity about gravity.
Video recorder is used to document the pupils' activity about gravity. | Source

Video Lesson on Gravity

LCD projector displays images, text and learning videos enough for the whole class to see.
LCD projector displays images, text and learning videos enough for the whole class to see. | Source

Lesson Plan for Gravity

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Gravity

II.Period/Time Schedule: (indicate the time)

III. Overview

Gravity is a downward force which tries to pull two objects toward each other. Anything which has mass also has a gravitational pull. The more massive an object is, the stronger is its gravitational pull. Earth's gravity is what keeps you on the ground and what causes objects to fall. Gravity is what holds the planets in orbit around the sun and what keeps the moon in orbit around Earth. The closer you are to an object, the stronger its gravitational pull is. Gravity is what gives you weight. It is the force that pulls on all of the mass in your body.

IV. Objectives

1. Differentiate gravity from other forces acting on a body.

2. Infer how gravity affects the motion of an object.

3. Investigate some factors affecting the pull of gravity.

4. Display humbleness in every way.

V. Material and Technology

  • Video recorder
  • coin
  • Cable wire (computer connection)
  • feather
  • Hard copies of the activity
  • meterstick
  • Laptop or computer
  • LCD projector

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set

● Recall the concepts learned about motion.

● Introduce and relate new lesson by letting the pupils watch the video clip downloaded

from http://www.makemegenius.com/video_play.php?id=38&type=0.

● Ask the pupils:

1.) Why is it difficult to climb the highest part of the stair?

2.) Why did the fruits fall?

3.) What kind of force causes the ball to fall to the ground? Describe it.

B. Content Presentation/Student Discovery

● Discuss the concepts on gravity by citing situations and showing examples.

● Divide the class into five groups. Ask the groups to perform the twenty minutes activity. The hard copy of the activity will be provided. One of the members must be assigned as the video recorder. The whole activity (procedure, data and observation, answers and conclusion) must be documented. The file must be sent to the teacher after the given time. The same file will be rated based on the criteria below:

Criteria of the Video-Recorded Activity

Cooperation/Teamwork -25%

Correctness of Data - 50%

Presentation/Creativity - 25%

Total- 100%

●The activity is shown hereunder:

Title : Observing Motion affected by Forces

I. Problem : How do forces affect motion?

II. Materials : coin feather meterstick

III. Procedure:

1.) Get a coin. Throw the coin upward and let it fall to the ground. Observe what happens.

2.) Slide the coin on the floor. Infer why the coin slows down and stops.

3.) Prepare a feather and a coin. Hold the feather and the coin 2 meters above the floor. Observe which one will reach the ground first if you drop the feather and the coin at the same time.

IV. Data and Observation:

(Answer the following questions.)

1.) Which object reached the ground first?

2.) What kind of force causes the coin to fall to the ground? Describe it.

3.) Why did the coin rolling on the floor slow down and stop?

4.) What kind of force opposes the motion of the feather?

V. Conclusion:

_____________________________________________________________

VII. Generalization

Ask the pupils to complete this phrase. (Call several pupils to complete this phrase until all the concepts about gravity have been given.)

I have learned that GRAVITY _____________________________________________.

VIII. Evaluation

The pupils are evaluated based on the result of the activity.

IX. Assignment

● Answer the following questions:

1.) What is friction?

2.) What are the different kinds of friction? Describe each.

This shows how friction affects motion.
This shows how friction affects motion. | Source
In this lesson, lapel speaker is used for outdoor activity and for playing necessary audio file.
In this lesson, lapel speaker is used for outdoor activity and for playing necessary audio file. | Source
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is utilized as storage for music file.
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is utilized as storage for music file. | Source

Lesson Plan for Friction

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Friction

II. Period/Time Schedule : (indicate the time)

III. Overview

Friction is the force that opposes motion. It causes the object that moves along a surface to slow down and eventually stop. Friction is a force that opposes motion between two surfaces touching each other. Air friction affects the motion of falling objects by acting against the force of gravity.

There are different kinds of friction. Rolling friction is the frictional force associated with the rotational movement of a wheel or other circular objects along a surface. Sliding friction, also called dry friction, occurs when two objects rub against each other or slide against each other. Fluid friction is the friction between a solid object and the liquid or gas it is moving in. Objects moving through a fluid experience fluid friction, called drag. Drag acts between the object and the fluid and hinders the motion of the object. The force of drag depends upon the object’s shape, material, and speed, as well as the fluid’s viscosity. On the other hand, static friction occurs in stationary objects. It prevents an object from moving against a surface. It is the force that keeps a book from sliding off a desk, even when the desk is slightly tilted.

IV. Objectives

1. Infer how friction affects the motion of an object.

2. Compare the movements of objects on different surfaces.

3. Cite some advantages and disadvantages of friction.

4. Show ways to reduce friction among friends and family members.

V. Material and Technology

  • Lapel speaker
  • Rods
  • Universal Serial Bus (USB) with aerobics music
  • Spring scale
  • Hard copy of the activity
  • Sandpaper
  • Laptop
  • Long crayons
  • LCD projector
  • Hook
  • Block of wood
  • Baby powder
  • marking pen
  • Glass jars A and B

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set

● Using the lapel microphone with audio player and recorder, ask the pupils to perform

a simple stretching and lounging exercise.

● Ask: How will you able to do the lounging exercise without falling?

What material or object do you use or wear that prevents you from sliding?

B. Content Presentation

● Using Microsoft PowerpointPresentation, discuss the lesson on friction.

● Demonstrate and explain simple activities about friction. Let the pupils perform the

teacher-led activities.

◘ Rub your palms together for about one minute. What do you feel? If you rub long enough, you will feel how hot your palms are. This is the effect of friction. The mechanical energy is changed to heat energy and the surface wears away.

◘ Observe the underside surface of a pair of rubber shoes. Identify the bumps and the hollows of the rubber shoes. What is the purpose of the bumps and hollows in rubber shoes?

◘ Get two empty glass jars with cover. Label the glass jars A and B. Close glass jar A tightly, then open it with your dry hand. Close glass jar B tightly. Put some soap on your hand. Try to open the jar with your slippery hands. Were you able to open it easily? Why? Which way is easier to open the glass jar, with dry hands or hands with soap? Why?

VII. Generalization

● Ask: How does friction affect the motion of the object?

VIII. Evaluation

● Request the pupils to proceed to their group station. (The instruction of the activity should be recorded earlier to the recording gadget of each group). The questions to be answered after the activity are provided for each station.

● This experiment will last in fifteen minutes. When the time is over, a siren sound will be played.

● Discuss the result of the activity.

IX. Assignment

Answer the following:

1. Friction is useful and sometimes harmful. In humans, friction can break relationships.

How can you reduce friction among friends and family members?

2. What is speed?

3. How can you measure the speed of a moving object?

Video Lesson about Speed

Lesson Plan for Speed

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Speed

II.Period/Time Schedule: (indicate the time)

III. Overview

Speed is the rate of motion or the distance traveled by an object within a given time. Speed shows how fast the motion of an object is. It shows the relationship between distance reached by a moving object and the period of the time spent.

The formula for speed is S=d/t where S is the average speed, d, the distance covered, and t is the time given. Speed can be expressed in feet or meters per second, miles or kilometers per hour or whatever units the distance and time represent.

IV. Objectives

1. Define speed.

2. Compute for the speed of a moving object.

3. Convert one unit to another.

4. Value the old adage that says “God made time, but man made haste”.

V. Material and Technology

  • Computer units with internet connection
  • battery-operated toy car
  • Laptop tape measure/meter stick
  • LCD projector timer
  • Chalk or marker

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set

● Show the recorded video of two grade six pupils running in the 50-meter track.

(Note: If they know the characters in the video, the more you get their attention.)

● Describe the video clip. What are the terms used to describe motion?

B. Content Presentation

● Using the observations given by the pupils on the first part of the lesson, introduce the

term speed and discuss its meaning.

● Show an illustration of a boy running in a track. The illustration shows the motion of a

boy running a 100-meter dash from the starting line to the finishing line for 14

seconds. What is the speed of the boy? To find the speed, use the formula:

Speed= distance traveled

Time interval/Time given

or

S=d/t

● Give sample problems. (Teacher-guided demonstration problem-solving.)

●Let the pupils solve the sample problem:

1. Suppose the winner in the running event spent 1 minute and 36 seconds in a

50-meter run. What is the average speed? (Convert the time to seconds.)

2. What is the average speed of a car which started running from 7:00 a.m. and reached the destination at 9:00 a.m. covering a distance of 100 kilometers?

VII. Generalization

● What is speed?

● How do you compute for the speed of an object?

● Let the pupils complete these items:

◘ The distance covered by a moving object over a period of time is its ______.

◘ Speed can be expressed in ______ per hour or ______ per second.

VIII. Evaluation

Divide the class into groups. Let them perform the activity below.

◘ Get a battery-operated toy car. Mark a point on the table. From this point, let the toy

car run for 5 seconds, then mark the point where it has reached. What is the distance

traveled by the toy car for 5 seconds? Get a tape measure or meter stick and find out

the distance in meter. Compute for the speed of the battery-operated toy car?

IX. Assignment

Ask the pupils to answer the problems below. Require them to send their answers to the e-mail address provided by the teacher. For pupils without computer units or internet connection at home, they can use the computer units at the computer laboratory room. (Computer reservation will be done for this lesson.)

1. A car is traveling a distance of 180 kilometers at a speed of 60 km per hour.

How long did it travel? Write the formula.

2. John runs 20 kilometers in 2 hours. What will be his average speed per hour?

Comparing Speed and Velocity

Cellular phone is employed as data transferring device in this lesson.
Cellular phone is employed as data transferring device in this lesson. | Source

Lesson Plan for Velocity

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Velocity

II.Period/Time Schedule:(indicate the time)

III. Overview

Velocity is the speed of an object moving in one direction along a straight path. It is used to express the rate of motion of a body. Constant velocity indicates that a body has constant speed and constant direction.

Units of velocity must contain a length of unit, a time unit, and a direction. Examples are 20 km per hour west and 30 kilometers per hour, north.

IV. Objectives

1. Differentiate speed and velocity.

2. Solve simple problems on speed and velocity.

3. Convert units accurately and honestly.

V. Material and Technology

  • Laptop
  • LCD projector with remote control
  • Cellular phone (Note: Parent's and class adviser's cellular phone permit will be given. One registered cellular phone per group will be strictly observed.)
  • Broadband (The smartbroad of the teacher will be used this lesson.)

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set/Review

● Flash the problems given as their assignment. Show sample e-mail sent as

preparation. Check the assignment.

● Review the previous lesson.

● Ask: How can you determine the speed of a moving object?

● To reveal the topic for today, call a pupil to click the button flashed on the smartboard.

B. Content Presentation

● Use the teacher-made powerpoint presentation in discussing the lesson on velocity.

● Let the pupils compare speed and velocity.

● Using a venn diagram, ask them to compare the two concepts by writing their similarities and differences.

● Show how velocity is computed using this problem:

A car traveling northward started at 1:30 pm and reached the destination at 4:30 pm. It traveled a distance of 180 kilometers. Let us compute for the speed and the velocity.

We use: S= d/t

S= 180 km

3 hours

S= 60 kph

Therefore, the car traveled at an average speed of 60 kilometer per hour (kph). It traveled northward. The car’s velocity is 60 kph north. We say, the velocity of the car is 60 km per hour toward North.

● Let the pupils practice solving for the velocity of an object by answering this problem:

The Sue family was riding in a car bound northward to visit their relative in the province. They traveled 180 kilometers in 2 hours?

1.) What is the average speed of the car?

2.) In what direction do they travel?

3.) What is the velocity of the car?

4.) What formula do you use to compute the average speed?

5.) What two factors are considered in finding the velocity of an object?

VII. Generalization

● How do speed and velocity differ?

● How do we find the velocity of an object?

VIII. Evaluation

● Divide the class into five groups. Inform them of the guidelines of the activity.

Activity Guidelines

  1. There are five (5) stations.
  2. There must be one group per station at a time.
  3. No group must solve or answer in each station. Solving or answering should be done on your respective group table.
  4. After the given time for Station Hopping, another ten minutes are given for Brainstorming(Answering) Activity which include sending of answers on the mobile number provided.
  5. The group answers must follow the prescribed Text Format given.

GROUP CODE :_____

FINAL ANSWER PER STATION :

S1 : _____

S2 : _____

S3 : _____

S4 : _____

S5 : _____

6. Only the registered cellular number with group code will be opened or else the group output will be voided.

● After announcing the guidelines, the groups will solve for the velocity of the following

objects.

◘ Station 1

Object: A

Distance: 150 km

Time: 2 hrs

Direction: Northwest

Velocity: ?

◘ Station 2

Object: B

Distance: 200 m

Time: 2 hrs (change to second)

Direction: North

Velocity: ?

◘ Station 3

Object: C

Distance: 5 m

Time: 2, 000 sec

Direction: West

Velocity: ?

◘ Station 4

Object: D

Distance: 10, 500 m (change meter to kilometer)

Time:3 hrs

Direction: Southeast

Velocity: ?

D 10, 500 m 3 hr Southeast ?

◘ Station 5

Object: E

Distance: 7 km

Time: 5 hrs

Direction: South

Velocity: ?

● After the given time for the activity, ask the groups to send their answers to the mobile number given by the teacher.

● The forwarded answers via cellular phone will be flashed and checked the following meeting.

IX. Assignment

Answer the following:

1. What are the three laws of motion? Describe each.

2. Explain this: An object at rest or in motion will always remain in that state unless

acted upon by an outside force.”




Learn More about the Law of Inertia

Lesson Plan for Newton's First Law of Motion (The Law of Inertia)

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Newton’s First Law of Motion: The Law of Inertia

II. Period/Time Schedule : (indicate the time)

III. Overview

Newton’s First Law of Motion is known as the Principle of Inertia. The Law of inertia states that “an object at rest stays at rest until an outside force causes it to move, or an object in motion continues to move in the same direction until a force stops it or changes its direction”.

Inertia is the resistance of an object to change its motion. Every object has inertia which causes it to resist a change in its motion. Therefore, a moving object will keep moving in a straight line, and an object at rest will remain at rest unless an outside force is applied on it.

IV. Objectives

1. Explain Newton’s First Law of Motion.

2. Investigate how force affects an object at rest and an object in motion.

3. Recognize the importance of fastening seatbelt when riding a car.

V. Material and Technology

  • Laptop
  • LCD projector with remote control
  • Cellular phone or recording device
  • Bluetooth dangle or cable wire
  • glass
  • pingpong ball
  • cardboard
  • coin
  • books
  • pendulum

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set/Review

● Check the preparation of the pupils.

● Require the pupils to observe the stand fan being switched on and then switched off. Do the blades stop automatically? Why?

● Gather the responses of the pupils.

B. Content Presentation

● Discuss the Law of Inertia using the slides prepared in MS powerpoint presentation. To understand further the concepts of inertia, demonstrate this activity.

Get an empty glass, a coin, and a cardboard. Place the cardboard over the glass and put the coin on top of the cardboard. Flick the cardboard at the edge with your finger and observe. Where did the coin go? Why did the coin fall inside the glass?

Push big table and a small table. In which table do you need greater force? Which table were you able to move easily? Why?

Look at the picture. (Show picture of a bus filled with passengers.) What do you think will happen to the passengers if the bus suddenly stops? Do you think accident may occur?

Get a pingpong ball and billiard ball. Throw first the pingpong ball then mark the point where the ball fell. Now, throw the billiard ball, then mark the point where the ball fell. Compare the distance. Which object reached a farther distance? Why?

VII. Generalization

Check the learning of the pupils by asking the following:

◘ When you are riding on a coaster that is running too fast, then it suddenly stops, in what direction does your body move? Why?

◘ Why does the billiard ball roll faster than the pingpong ball?

◘ Explain Newton’s First Law of Motion.

◘ Why do passengers need to fasten their seatbelts?

VIII. Evaluation

● Ask the class to perform the activity per table. Using the materials given (ten books

and pendulum), the pupils will follow the instruction or the procedure of the activity

which will be sent through Bluetooth device. (Before this activity, the teacher will ask

at least five pupils from each section to prepare the device).

● The simple activity of the pupils is shown below.

Title : Observing Inertia of Objects

I. Problem : How does force affect an object at rest and an object in motion?

II. Materials : ten books pendulum

III. Procedure : Please refer to the Bluetooth file sent through the assigned device per

table.

1. Pile the books one on top of another. Pull out the book at the bottom of the pile fast.

Observe what happens to the rest of the books in the pile.

2. Prepare a pendulum. Hang the pendulum. Pull the bob to one side and release. Observe what happens to it after some time.

IV. Data and Observation

1. Why do books at the top of the stack stay in place when you pull out the bottom most one?

2. What happens to the pendulum when you pull and release the bob?

3. What caused the pendulum to stop?

V. Conclusion:_________________________________________________

IX. Assignment

● Answer the following:

1. State the second Law of Motion?

2. Differentiate acceleration from deceleration.

3. How do you compute the acceleration of an object?

Bluetooth dongle is also used as data transferring device.
Bluetooth dongle is also used as data transferring device. | Source

Science teaching requires passion, talent, time and creativity. Using different tools and strategies in teaching catch the attention of the pupils. Moreover, utilizing gadgets or devices that they can relate and manipulate make them more participative and knowledgeable.

— P. de Garcia

Check this Video on Newton's Second Law of Motion

Lesson Plan for Newton's Second Law of Motion (Law of Acceleration)

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Newton’s Second Law of Motion: The Law of Acceleration

II. Period/Time Schedule : (indicate the time)

III. Overview

Newton’s Second Law of Motion states that “the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the mass of the object”. The law of acceleration has something to do with the force acting on an object. When there is a force, an object changes its motion. An object can change its motion in many ways. It can speed up, slow down, or it can change the direction in which it is moving. How fast the object moves depends on two factors---net force or the force applied and the amount of matter or the mass of an object.

The greater the force applied the greater the change in motion of an object. This shows that acceleration is directly proportional to the force applied. But if the object’s mass is great, the acceleration of an object is less. Thus, a heavy object moves slowly. This shows that acceleration is inversely proportional to the mass of an object. To enable greater acceleration, a greater force has to be applied on the object.

Acceleration may be observed when any of the following occurs.

1. Change in speed

a. accelerating—speeding up

b. decelerating—slowing down

2. Change in direction

Acceleration (a) may be expressed as a change in speed per unit time.

a= Vf-Vi / t

Where: a = acceleration

Vf=final speed

Vi=initial speed

t =elapsed time

IV. Objectives

1. State the Newton’s Second Law of Motion.

2. Solve some problems on acceleration.

3. Differentiate acceleration and deceleration.

4. Relate acceleration to one’s life.

V. Material and Technology

  • Computer units with internet connection and MS Word
  • Laptop
  • LCD projector

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set/Review

● Check the answers of the pupils regarding the assignments given.

1. What does the second Law of Motion state?

2. How do you compute the acceleration of an object?

3. Differentiate acceleration from deceleration.

B. Content Presentation

● To understand the concept on acceleration, ask the pupils to log on to the interactive online movies.

● Check the earned game points of the pupils.

● Ask the pupils:

1. What is acceleration?

2. When is a moving object said to be accelerated? decelerated?

3. Describe the acceleration of falling object?

● Discuss more Newton’s Second Law of Motion using the prepared slides in MS

powerpoint.

◘ Questions:

1) Is the jeepney traveling at the same speed all throughout?

2) Is the speed of the jeepney at position A the same as that in B?

3) Is the velocity of the jeepney at A the same as that in B? Why?

4) What is the acceleration of the jeepney?

VII. Generalization

1) When can you say that an object is accelerating?

2) Is the acceleration of all moving objects the same? Why?

3) How will you determine the acceleration of an object?

VIII. Evaluation

Ask the pupils to open the folder with Acceleration filename found in their respective desktop.(Password of the file will just be announced). The activity is encoded in Microsoft Word. The activity is shown below:

Solve for the following:

1. Find the acceleration of an object that moves from rest to 40 m/s in 5 seconds.

2. A truck traveling at 50 km/hr slows down to 30 km/h in 0.2 hours. Find its

acceleration.

● Require the pupils to save their output and send to the email address of the teacher.

IX. Assignment

Answer the problem hereunder.

Suppose you ride a bike on a straight path to school at a velocity of 4 m/s. As you get closer, you hear the school bell. In 3 s, you speed up to 10 m/s. How would you calculate your acceleration?

For every action there is an equal and opposite  reaction.
For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. | Source
In this lesson, compact disc is utilized as storage for  the recorded video file of the students.
In this lesson, compact disc is utilized as storage for the recorded video file of the students. | Source

Lesson Plan for Newton's Third Law of Motion (Law of Interaction )

I. Subject Matter/Topic : Newton’s Third Law of Motion: The Law of Interaction

II. Period/Time Schedule : (indicate the time)

III. Overview

Newton’s Third Law of Motion states that “for every force of action, there is always an equal and opposite force of reaction”. The law of interaction is also demonstrated in a rowing boat. To move the boat, the oar is put in water. When it is put in water, the water exerts an equal force on both sides of the oar. However when the rowers pull on their oars, the surface of the flat side of the oars pushes against the water. The water pushes back on the oars with an equal and opposite force. The boat moves in the opposite direction of the oars with a force that is equal to that of the oars pushing against the water.

Objects moving in circular motion likewise demonstrate the third law of motion. When a motorcycle racer turns at a sharp-curved road, two forces are acting on it. There is an outward force pulling the motorcycle. This force is a centrifugal force. To balance this outward force, the racer leans his motorcycle and his body towards the center. This inward force is called the centripetal force. That pulls the object towards the center. When the centrifugal force and centripetal force are balanced, they keep the objects move in circular motion.

IV. Objectives

1. State the Newton’s Third Law of Motion.

2. Identify the action and reaction forces.

3. Cite situations where the Law of Interaction is applied.

4. Make a movie that demonstrates the Law of Interaction.

5. Show a sense of responsibility for every action made.

V. Material and Technology

  • MS Powerpoint Presentation on Newton’s Third Law of Motion
  • Downloaded video clips on Rocket Launching, Diving and Biking
  • Laptop
  • LCD projector
  • Video Recorder
  • Compact discs (Recordable)

VI. Instructional Procedure

A. Introductory Set/Review

● Check and answer the assignment given.

Suppose you ride a bike on a straight path to school at a velocity of 4 m/s. As you get closer, you hear the school bell. In 3 s, you speed up to 10 m/s. How would you calculate your acceleration?

● Show a video clip about Diving.

● Let the pupils describe what they have seen and relate to the topic for the day.

B. Content Presentation

● Using the slides prepared in MS Powerpoint Presentation, discuss the concepts and

examples of Newton’s Third Law of Motion_Law of Interaction.

● To further understand the lesson, ask the pupils to work by group. Ask them to

prepare their video recorder. They must show in their output (recorded video) how they

perform the Procedure of the activity using the given materials, answer the questions

under Data and Observation and formulate their conclusion.

Title : Identifying Action and Reaction Force

I. Problem : How is action force related to reaction force?

II. Materials : two inflated balloon two spring scale

III. Procedure:

A-1) Assign two persons to hold each spring scale.

2) Attach both end hook each spring scale and tell the person holding the spring scale to pull lightly.

3) Observe and read the force in each spring scale.

B- 1) Inflate one balloon.

2) Hold the balloon with the opening downward and let go.

3) Observe the direction of the balloon.

4) Inflate another balloon and hold the balloon horizontally then let go.

5) Observe the direction of the balloon.

6) Identify what causes the balloon to fly.

IV. Data and Observation

Answer the following:

1) Which of the two activities (A and B) show action force? Reaction force?

2) What can you say about the action force and the reaction force exerted by two person?

3) What are the action and the reaction force when you release the inflated balloon?

V. Conclusion: ___________________________________

● Their recorded video will be imported in a MovieMaker software and saved in a

compact discs (cd) for future reference and documentation.

VII. Generalization

● What does the Law of Interaction state?

● Cite situations where Newton’s Third Law of Motion is shown.

● Explain how the Third Law of Motion is applied when a cyclist turns at the sharp-

curved road.

VIII. Evaluation

The pupils are evaluated based on the activity they have performed. Use a rubric to rate their performance.

IX. Assignment

● Explain the statement below:

“We should be responsible for every action we do even if we do not know the reactions.”

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The lesson plans provided in this article are made,used and tested by the author. You may adapt, improve or use these as your reference. Just feel free to give me message via Fanmail if you want to use this compilation of lesson plans.

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