ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Education and Science»
  • History & Archaeology

The Formation of Ancient Babylon

Updated on April 5, 2015
Source

Around 1900BC, the Amorites (a people from Syria) moved into Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. These people were skilled in all sorts of crafts such as metal working, perfumery and beekeeping. They herded sheep and goats, and farmed barley.

The Amorites made their capital at the city of Babylon by the Euphrates. During the late 1700s BC, their king Hammurabi conquered the whole of Mesopotamia, which then became known as Babylonia.

King Hammurabi
King Hammurabi | Source

The land they had conquered contained people of many different cultures and laws, so King Hammurabi decided to unify the laws, which were inscribed on a stone stela, or tablet, of black basalt rock. They include laws about money, property, the family and the rights of slaves. The phrase “an eye for an eye and a tooth from a tooth” comes from Hammurabi’s laws. According to the law, a wrongdoer had to be punished in a way that suited the crime.

The code of Hammurabi
The code of Hammurabi | Source

Babylon became a sophisticated city and a great center for science, literature and learning. Babylonian scholars developed the numbering system based on groups of 60 – this is how we get our 60-minute hour and 360-degree circle.

A stone map showing the known land masses surrounded by a ring of ocean. This map was made by Babylonian scholars more than 3000 years ago. They labelled it with wedge-shaped cuneiform writing.
A stone map showing the known land masses surrounded by a ring of ocean. This map was made by Babylonian scholars more than 3000 years ago. They labelled it with wedge-shaped cuneiform writing. | Source
The dragon symbolized Marduk, supreme god of the Babylonians. They worshipped many gods, incluing the sun god Shamash, and Ishtar, the goddess of War and love.
The dragon symbolized Marduk, supreme god of the Babylonians. They worshipped many gods, incluing the sun god Shamash, and Ishtar, the goddess of War and love.

Many of the neighboring rulers were jealous of Babylon’s power and the wealth Babylonians acquired from trade. The city was attacked many times. Hittites (from the area that is now Turkey) raided Babylon, and then Kassites, from mountains to the east, invaded and took over the city. The Kassites turned Babylon into and important religious center, and built a large temple to their supreme God, Marduk.

The Ishtar Gate, decorated with blue stone, was the eigth gate to the inner city of Babylon.  It was constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II. It was speckled with images of lions.
The Ishtar Gate, decorated with blue stone, was the eigth gate to the inner city of Babylon. It was constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II. It was speckled with images of lions. | Source

At around 900BC, Babylon was invaded again by the Chaldeans, horsemen from the Gulf coast. Their greatest king, Nebuchadnezzar II, rebuilt the city magnificently. He gave it massive mud brick walls, strong gates, and a seven-storey ziggurat (massive structures). The king also built a palace for himself and the Hanging Gardens, which was one of the Seven Wonders or the ancient world.

King Nebuchadnezzar built fabulous hanging, or terraced, gardens for his wife Amytis to remind her of the green hill country of her home in Media. No one today really knows what the gardens looked like, and some even question their existence.
King Nebuchadnezzar built fabulous hanging, or terraced, gardens for his wife Amytis to remind her of the green hill country of her home in Media. No one today really knows what the gardens looked like, and some even question their existence. | Source

Key Dates

1900BC: Babylon becomes chief city of the Amorites.

1792-1750BC: Reign of King Hammurabi, law-giver and conqueror of Mesopotamia.

1595-1155BC: The Kassites rule the city of Babylon.

900BC: The Chaldeans take over Babylon and begin to rebuild it.

605-562BC: Reign of King Nebuchadnezzar. He builds the great Handing Gardens. Babylon is the most sophisticated city in the Near East.

Babylon became the largest city in western Asia. The trade along the rivers and via the caravan routes leading eastward to Iran made it wealthy once more. This glorious city survived until it was again invaded, this time by the Persians.

What do you find the most interesting about Ancient Babylon?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Danida profile image
      Author

      Danida 4 years ago from London

      @AudreyHowitt: Thank you!

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 4 years ago from California

      Such an interesting hub!!

    • Danida profile image
      Author

      Danida 4 years ago from London

      @Eiddwen: Thank you!

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      A brilliant hub; so interesting, well presented and voted up.

      eddy.

    • Danida profile image
      Author

      Danida 4 years ago from London

      @Searchinsany: Thanks :)

    • searchinsany profile image

      Alexander Gibb 4 years ago from UK

      Very interesting and informative.

    • Danida profile image
      Author

      Danida 4 years ago from London

      @NathaNater: Yup :) I love learning about ancient civilizations. I wonder what they'll teach people about us in thousands of years...

    • Danida profile image
      Author

      Danida 4 years ago from London

      @Lady Guinevere: It's crazy how many people invaded the place! I agree that it's jealousy though, that's generally the drive for all battles and hate. Thanks for vote and share!

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 4 years ago from West By God

      Love this! Rome also conquered this land some years later and I do believe that when Christians say bad things about this place that they are very jealous too. Heck Rome wants all and everything and to some extent still does. I voted up , interesting and useful and I am going to share it.

    • NathaNater profile image

      NathaNater 4 years ago

      That is very fascinating. It's interesting to learn about some of the oldest civilizations on Earth.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)