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The Legendary Copihue, the Bell-Flower of Chile.

Updated on May 21, 2013

The glorious Copihue, shining blood red against the green background

The lovely blood red Copihue, against its green background
The lovely blood red Copihue, against its green background | Source

The Ancestral Home of the Mapuche and the Copihue

This beautiful flower is usually mentioned in relation to the Mapuche, the indigenous inhabitants of south central Chile, due to the fact that the habitat of both the Mapuche and the Copihue is roughly the same.

The Mapuche once occupied an area that spread from the Aconcagua River near Valparaiso right down to the Chiloe Archipelago. They inhabited the central valley and both the forests of the coastal range and of the foothills of the Andes Mountains.

The virgin forests in this area, with their dense foliage, damp atmosphere and extremely fertile soil composted by the thick vegetation, have provided the ideal environment for the Copihue since prehistoric times.

The Aconcagua Valley

The Aconcagua Valley, the most southern of the transverse valleys of Chile
The Aconcagua Valley, the most southern of the transverse valleys of Chile | Source

The Copihue in the Lives of the Mapuche

At the start of the 16th century, when the Spaniards arrived to Chile, the Mapuche were still hunter-gatherers, with an incipient agriculture and a very loose tribal structure based on the extended family.

They were not really a warrior nation, but they did practice warfare during tribal conflicts. They developed their warrior expertise when they confronted the Inca conquest, which they repelled.

The armies of the Inca Empire were obliged to withdraw to the Maule River, which became the extreme southern border of that great Empire.

The Maule River, where the Mapuche defeated the Inca armies

Aerial view of the Maule River, the southern limit of the Inca Empire after the decisive battle with the Mapuche
Aerial view of the Maule River, the southern limit of the Inca Empire after the decisive battle with the Mapuche | Source

The Arrival of the Spaniards

These were the next invaders to come in contact with the Mapuche. The Spaniards tried to establish settlements and towns as far south as Valdivia, but eventually had to abandon this southern territory.

The boundary between the Spaniards and the Mapuche was fixed at the Biobio River, and the hostilities lasted for three hundred years!

The Biobio River, where the Mapuche defeated the Spaniards

The mighty Biobio River, where the Mapuche stopped the Spaniards for 300 years.
The mighty Biobio River, where the Mapuche stopped the Spaniards for 300 years. | Source

The Sun Shines on the Copihue Flowers, Amongst the Trees

The sun shines through the trees, lighting up the Copihue flowers
The sun shines through the trees, lighting up the Copihue flowers | Source

The Copihue as a Symbol of the Mapuche

During all these developments, the Copihue occupied a special place in the Mapuche culture.

The modern name is adapted from Mapudungun – the language spoken by the Mapuche. Their name for this flower is “kopiwe” which means something like “hanging downwards”.

For the Mapuche, the Copihue represents many aspects and values.

  • It is a symbol of happiness, of friendship and of gratitude


  • It is considered to be sacred to them.


  • The warriors venerated the Copihue as an Emblem of Courage and Liberty.


  • The younger members of the tribes considered the Copihue as the Guardian of their romantic love.


  • The Copihue was traditionally used as an adornment during the marriage ceremonies.


  • Many Mapuche legends have existed that include the Copihue as a central element.


High Up in the Branches, the Copihue is very Secret

The Copihue, hanging high up amongst the trees
The Copihue, hanging high up amongst the trees | Source

Some Facts About the Copihue

  • The flower grows on a vine that may reach over 10 meters in height by climbing among the shrubs and trees of its habitat.


  • The leaves are arranged alternately and are rather leathery evergreens.


  • The flowers have six thick, waxy tepals which are usually blood red, lightly spotted with white.


  • The flowers are long and tube-like and hang down, hence the English name of “Bell-flower”.


  • In its natural habitat, the plant is pollinated by hummingbirds.


  • The fruit is like a long berry with a tough skin containing lots of small seeds placed in a fleshy body which is edible.


  • The new plants that develop from the seedlings can take up to ten years to flower, a characteristic that has contributed to making the plant rather rare.


  • In 1977 the Copihue was given legal protection by the Chilean government.


A Close-up of the Underpetals of the Copihue

Close-up showing the inside of the "bell"
Close-up showing the inside of the "bell" | Source

The Fruit of the Copihue is an Edible Berry

A Great Photo Showing the Fruit of the Copihue Beside the Flower
A Great Photo Showing the Fruit of the Copihue Beside the Flower | Source

What Is So Special About the Copihue?

The list stated above shows the cold facts about this flower, but what makes it so special?

Basically, its beauty and the natural background of the dark green forests where it hangs high up under the branches.

You really need to see it personally; the photos are lovely, but not as impressive as the real thing!

It has been my privilege to actually see the Copihue in the southern forests, and also to have a few decorating my table, we used to be able to buy them in the market-place.

The petals (tepals) are very thick and glossy, they actually glisten! The legends that surround it imbue the observer with a feeling of reverence that is not easy to explain.

All in all, the Copihue provides a very special experience to the viewer.

The Very Rare White Copihue

The lovely white Copihue, a very rare specimen
The lovely white Copihue, a very rare specimen | Source

The History of the Modern Scientific Name of the Copihue

Our Chilean Copihue arrived in Europe during the Napoleonic period. It was taken there by European botanists who came to South America at that time, looking for new species.

Napoleon’s first love, Josephine, had been set aside by the Emperor because she was barren and he needed heirs. She was currently planning and developing her famous gardens at Malmaison when the Copihue arrived in Europe.

Josephine was famous for her beauty and the Copihue was also very beautiful. As Josephine’s last name was La Pagerie, the botanists named the Copihue Lapageria rosea in her honor, and also provided her with some specimens for her gardens at Malmaison.

The Napoleonic era is now long gone, but the scientific name of the Copihue has persisted through time and is used wherever there are botanical gardens that cultivate the Chilean Copihue.

To mention a couple of these gardens, we have the Botanical Gardens at Kew, UK, where the Copihue has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.

The University of California’s Botanical Garden at Berkeley also harbors the Copihue, initially taken there around 1935.

The San Francisco Bay Area seems to provide good climatic conditions for growing Lapageria rosea in the US.

When growing outside its natural habitat, the Copihue needs to be hand pollinated. It is a difficult plant to grow but well worth it!

The Copihue on Display at the Kew Gardens in UK

Kew Gardens proudly shows the Copihue from Chile
Kew Gardens proudly shows the Copihue from Chile | Source

The Copihue is a Flower of Many Legends

As could be expected, there are many legends attached to the Copihue. This is the one I like best.

A legend

"When the Mapuche warriors went off to war, they would spend long periods away from their loved ones and families.

Then the younger maidens would climb to the top of the tallest trees in the forest so that they could look over the landscape and search for the distant warriors.

Very often they only saw columns of smoke and empty scenery. Desolate, they cried as they climbed down from their perches and their tears that fell on the branches and leaves of the trees gave birth to a “flower of blood”, which glistens with the blood of the Mapuche warriors who did not accept defeat and generally fought to the end."


A lovely legend for a mystic flower!


A Display of Lovely Copihue Flowers

A collection of lovely Copihue flowers, showing the red, the pink and the white variety
A collection of lovely Copihue flowers, showing the red, the pink and the white variety | Source

The Copihue, Poem and Song

Ignacio Verdugo Cavada presented us with his poem inspired by this lovely flower. In it, the Copihue speaks using the first person. My very free translation is as follows.

My translation

I am as a spark of fire, and I open my red petals in the dark shade of the forest.

I am the flower that shows itself next to the native dwellings.

My blood-like petals harbor the tears of the Mapuche from the Arauco Region.

I was born on a serene day, a product of a bright ray of sunlight that made love to the dark forest on the mountains of Chile.

My blood has wet the chains that the Mapuche destroyed, those same chains that the mountain snow has covered with its tears.

I am the blood of the inhabitants of Arauco, born of pain.

Nowadays the fires spread by the ambitious who crave material riches are destroying my living space.

So I will hide my sorrow in the deepest corners of the forest where my mountain cats still roar and my native inhabitants await to join my tears.

◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊◊

After this poem was published, in a Chilean newspaper around 1911, a fiend of the author composed the music, which is very lyrical.

During my years of schooling, both the song and the poem were a must; it was almost automatic to learn the words and sing the song. I even learnt to play it as part of my piano lessons. Nowadays it seems to have faded into oblivion, like so many other traditions.

The Copihue, a flower of many legends

The Copihue, a flower of many legends
The Copihue, a flower of many legends | Source

Rayen Quitral, the Mapuche Lyrical Soprano

Rayen Quitral (1916 – 1979), a Mapuche with a beautiful soprano voice, was trained in Europe as a lyrical singer during the first half of the 20th century.

Her name means “Flower of Fire”, and she was ever proud of her Mapuche ancestry, while singing on the European stages.

In Chile she was famous for her interpretation of “El Copihue Rojo” and to my surprise I found a vintage audio version on YouTube, which I’m including here.

I hope you listen and enjoy it!


Rayen Quitral sings El Copihue Rojo (1938)

Final Words

The Bell-flower of Chile, the beautiful Copihue, has ever been a part of the Chilean nation, from the little known years of pre-historic times right up to the present.

On the 24th of February of 1977, the Chilean government published the official statement that gave the Copihue the status of “the National Flower of Chile”.

At the same time, this special plant with its lovely, mystic flower was included in the list of highly protected species.

It is to be hoped that these measures will help preserve the Copihue for our future generations.


© Copyright joanveronica 2013 (Joan Robertson)

A Very Rare sight: The White Copihue

The rare white Copihue looks beautiful against the dark green background
The rare white Copihue looks beautiful against the dark green background | Source

Delicate Pink Touches on the Inside of the White Copihue

A close-up showing a white Copihue with the delicate pink touches on the inside of the petals
A close-up showing a white Copihue with the delicate pink touches on the inside of the petals | Source

The Pure White Copihue and One Showing a Pale Pink Underside

Two pure white Copihue flowers and one that is pale pink on the inside
Two pure white Copihue flowers and one that is pale pink on the inside | Source

What do you think?

How would you describe the Copihue?

See results

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    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 4 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      I'm pinning this beauty on my God's wonderful creation. I think I've seen this (or maybe similar kind) when I was in Costa Rica. They are very pretty and kind of unique in a way that it's hanging upside down as it blooms. I wonder how does the fruit taste like? Is it sweet or sour?

      Well, thank you for sharing.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Wow, Joan! What a bonus. Some great information on the bell flower mixed in with some history. Well done! This was written with the same great attention to detail that you give all of your hubs.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi billybuc, it's been some time, I'm so not motivated by the slow performance at Hubpages, but this was a cool Hub to write, and I'm so happy to receive your lovely comment! This flower is so much a part of my life, I can't really imagine reality without it! When I was a child (no TV) we used to go out on expeditions to see if we could find any. It was great fun! And so exciting when we found some! So beautiful, too. See you soon, I hope, and have a good day (or night, I'm never very clear on this).

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image

      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      This is a beautiful and well-researched hub about the Copihue flower. I enjoyed all the beautiful photographs as well as the history of this unique flower. Voted up and shared!

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 4 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi Joan,

      What a rare beautiful treasure this Copihue flower is, just stunning )which is what I voted) and the history so very interesting, it is truly magical. Looking at this I wish my late mum had seen this flower as she too would have loved it and loved to have given it a try to grow, even though our conditions would probably not be suitable. I love the shape and color variations from the blood red to the palest tinge of pink. You have done fantastic research mixed with your own great knowledge and experience Joan, we NEED YOU on HP, please don't stop! Voted up, useful, beautiful, shared and pinned to my flowers.

    • Jools99 profile image

      Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

      Joan, absolutely fascinating hub and I loved all of the great photos too. I love the white Copihue, it looks like it is made of lily white porcelain, it is so delicate. How amazing to think that a flower can be so revered as part of the identity of a nation or tribe (bit like Yorkshire and Lancashire and their roses!). The Copihue is a strange bloom in that it looks so delicate and fragile against the obviously sturdy vine on which it grows. I am very fond of bell shaped flowers and this is beautiful.

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 4 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      Thank you for this interesting hub, Joan! Those flowers are very delicate and beautiful! I especially like the red one with the kind of ligther dots on the inside!

      Thank you for sharing the legend, the interpretation of “El Copihue Rojo” by Rayen Quitral and all the other facts!

      Very interesting and beautiful!

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 4 years ago from Brazil

      What a beautiful flower. I am not sure I have the patience to wait 10 years to see a bloom though.

      You've written beautiful hub, very worthy of the flower. It is wonderful to know the history, myths and legends of plants. To some countries they see 'just a pretty flower', but to those who know, it is so much more.

      Brilliant hub.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Stepahie, such a lovely comment! And many thanks for the share! I'm so glad you enjoyed the photos, I really searched for the best I could find. The flower is not easy to photograph in situ, as you can imagine. And I'm happy you enjoyed the history as well, these are all elements of who I am, basically! Thanks again, and I hope to see you soon.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Suzie HQ, a very heart warming comment, thank you very much! I'm so happy you liked the Copihue in all its marvelous shades, this is all a part of my life and an element of who I am at this stage. I live on the shores of the Biobio river, the dividing line between the Spaniards and the Mapuche all those many years ago, and have taught many youngsters of a mixed heritage, especially while working in the rural areas. It makes me sad to think all these interesting elements are so unknown. Your message about continuing to plug away on Hubpages has been duly noted, very heart warming it is, too! So thanks again, and I hope to see you soon!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Jools from North-East UK! So nice to hear from you and to think that if I had gone back to Liverpool where my father's family lives, we could just possibly have met at some time! It's not such a big country after all. And I'm so glad you enjoyed my Hub, and that you also find the Copihue beautiful! I personally think it's the flower to end all flowers, but then I'm biased, I live in the region where it used to be plentiful, and I think the efforts at preservation are slowly succeeding in making it more abundant again. Let's hope the efforts are successful! Fortunately the plant can now be found in botanical gardens outside of Chile, so there is a genetic reserve fund. Thanks again for your comment and I hope to see you again on Hubpages!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi there kidscrafts, so nice of you to read and comment on my Hub! I'm so happy you enjoyed the information, I really worked at collecting it all in one place, the photos are not very plentiful, it's a difficult flower to photograph. There are a lot, that are copyrighted, the owners seem to know what they have in those photos and are keeping them as an exclusive! I don't blame them! And I'm also happy for your mention of Rayen Quitral, she was still around when I was a child, and as both my grandmother and mother were singers (choirs, etc), she was greatly admired in my home. That particular recording is a part of my life history! So thanks again for your comment, and I hope you have a good day!

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi blond logic, so happy for your visit and comment! About waiting 10 years for the plant to bloom, that time span is really nothing in the context of the virgin forests where the Copihue grows. The usual life span for most of the trees to mature is several hundred years. In fact the Chilean Araucaria takes nearly 1,000 years to become an adult tree! Actually, I was just thinking that that may be the reason the Copihue is also slow to develop, the whole environment where it lives is slow growing. Interesting thought! So thanks again for your comment, I'm happy you enjoyed the Hub and the photos, etc. See you again soon!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you for such a lovely hub, Joan. The facts are very interesting and the photos are beautiful!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi there Alicia! I'm so happy you liked the hub! The photos are really something, aren't they? Did you take any time to listen to the video by Rayen Quitral? I think it comes as a surprise, considsering the year (1938). That is truly a part of Chilean history. So thanks again, and I hope to see you soon.

    • platinumOwl4 profile image

      platinumOwl4 4 years ago

      This is the most exciting article I have read today. The vibrant color contrast in fantastic. I would like to have 1977 publication concerning this flower and the surrounding area. Thanks for sharing.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 4 years ago from New York

      Thank you for sharing this beautiful, exotic flower with us Joan. I would probably never have seen it and I know I would never have learned the history without your magnificent writing! The history, the flower, the poem and the beautiful selection of photos. Thank you my friend.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi platinum owl, many thanks for your visit and the comment, I'm so glad you liked it, and I will look up information about 1977, thank you once again and have a good day!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Mary, such a nice comment! I'm happy you liked the Hub, this is very much a part of my life, and I hold it dear!I hope you had time to listen to the video, it may be 1938, but it's still impressive in its way. The singer was very much alive and famous in Chile when I was young! See you again soon, and thanks again!

    • janetwrites profile image

      Janet Giessl 4 years ago from Georgia country

      This was such a beautiful and well-presented hub. I have never seen this stunning Copihue bell flower before. It was so interesting to read everything - the historical background, the facts and legend about this flower, the poem and of course the beautiful pictures. I appreciate your efforts for creating this wonderful hub.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi janetwrites, this was a wonderful comment to come home to after spending the day teaching! I'm so glad you enjoyed the Hub, I did write it from the heart, this is all part of my life. Thank you so much for your visit and the comment, I hope to see you soon!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 4 years ago from USA

      Such a beautiful and well researched hub on a gorgeous flower. I have never seen it before and really appreciated your sharing is facts, legend and history. So well done.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi FlourishAnyway, so happy for your visit and your comment. The content of this Hub is very dear to me, so your comment is very heartwarming. It's so nice to know you enjoyed it. Thanks again and have a good day!

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      A great educational hub about the Copihue flower. This flower is beautiful and has a great history behind it. Thank you for putting this hub together.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Vellur, so happy for your visit and your comment. I'm glad you liked this post, I wrote it with a lot of heart! See you!

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 3 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Joan - What a great hub and what stunning flowers! I had never heard about them before. Fascinating and so beautiful. Makes me want to go dig in the dirt and plant something. :) Theresa

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Teresa, many thanks for your visit and comment, and I'm so happy you liked this Hub! As you can imagine, I personally think the Copihue is wonderful. But Chile is very far away, so it is not well known. I wish all of my readers could come on a visit, I'm sure you would be fascinated! So I'll see you on Hubpages! Thanks again!

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 3 years ago from Florida

      What a gorgeous flower. I'd never heard of it before. The underside of the bloom reminds me of our Hibiscus. I'd love to see one of these!

      Voted UP and shared.

    • randomcreative profile image

      Rose Clearfield 3 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      I learned so much from this article. Great mix of photos and information! Thanks for the excellent resource!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Mary, what can I say? I love the copihue, but then I grew up with its presence nearby, there were many more then; now it is scarce, but recuperating! Thanks so much for the visit and the comment,also the share, and I'll see you soon.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi randomcreative, so happy for your visit and comment, and I'm so glad you liked this Hub, it was definitely written from the heart, the copihue grows in my region, and was plentiful when I was a child visiting the surrounding forests. Fortunately the government has spent efforts on saving it, and it is growing again! Thanks again, and I'll see you soon.

    • Rusticliving profile image

      Elizabeth Rayen 3 years ago from California

      I love rare and exotic flowers. I have never heard of the Copihue. It is absolutely gorgeous. Your information and photos really compliment your information. Thank you for sharing this wonderful bloom with us! Well done! Voted up and shared. ♥

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Rusticliving, so happy for you visit and comment! As you can imagine, I love this flower, it's part of my life, especially my childhood. When I was about 8, we used to go out on a Sunday in large groups of friends and relatives, looking for mushrooms. The whole lot of us, children and grownups, also did "copihue spotting" at the same time. It was part of the fun! It was a great thrill to find some, although we rarely picked them. So thanks again, and also for the share. See youu soon!

    • Vinaya Ghimire profile image

      Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

      I had never seen or heard about this flower. I love exotic and wild flowers. Thanks for sharing about this national flower of Chile. One day I will love to see Copihue with my eyes.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Vinaya, so happy for your visit and comment! I'm so glad you liked our Chilean Copihue, it really is beautiful! I of course love it very much! It's part of who I am. So thanks again and I'll see you soon

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      So lovely Joan!!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Audrey, many thanks! See you soon!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      The Bell flower is so beautiful and so much to know about it, a well accomplished hub with such incredible photos

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi DDE, so happy for your visit and comment! I'm so glad you liked the photos, I personally think they are lovely, but then, I love this flower!

      I grew up with it all round me, so to speak. So thanks again, and I'll be seeing you.

    • Writer Fox profile image

      Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      What a gorgeous flower! I've never seen anything like it. In the U.S. there are bluebell wild flowers, but they are very tiny. Enjoyed and voted up!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi, many thanks your visit and comment. I have been lucky in that I have experienced the joy of actually seeing the copihue in its natural habitat. The younger generations probably can't share, because this flower has become very scarce. But there are official efforts being carried out to bring it back to its initial glory. So thanks again and have a good day!

    • KenDeanAgudo profile image

      Kenneth C Agudo 3 years ago from Tiwi, Philippines

      A very beaitiful flower =) like a pitcher

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi KenDeanAgudo many thanks for your visit and comment! I'm so glad you liked the Copihue, it is a really beautiful flower. See you!

    • profile image

      Mirtha 3 years ago

      Lovely article! I bought a copihue here in Melbourne- Australia... 3 years ago....I am so glad that I saw your article, because I may need to wait another 7 years to get my first flowers!...

      Thanks You!

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Mirtha so happy for your visit and comment! It's nice to know that there are copihues in Melbourne! And you may get your flower beforethat time span, it all depends on the climate and the soil. All the best! See you!

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      So truly interesting and voted up for sure.

      Eddy.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Eddy, so happy for your visit and comment! Doubly so because having read some of your Hubs I know you love beauty in nature. Thank you for your support!

    • Suzanne Day profile image

      Suzanne Day 3 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

      I really like the little berry you can eat from the Copihue flower. Lovely photos! Voted interesting.

    • Phyllis Doyle profile image

      Phyllis Doyle Burns 3 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

      Hi Joan. The Copihue is such a beautiful, stunning flower. I like the history of the flower and the symbolic meanings of it. The history of the Mapuche is very interesting and their love for the Copihue is very touching. You have combined some very good attributes in this hub that I love: nature, symbolism and history. Well done, Joan -- I so enjoyed this hub.

    • joanveronica profile image
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      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Phyllis, coming from you this is high praise indeed! I'm so glad you liked this Hub, it's really a part of my life, I've lived with these contents all my life and I do love them! The singer, Rayen Quitral, was a favorite of my mother's , she introduced me to her music and story, I think before I was ten years old. The rest, as they say, is indeed real live history, at least for me! Thanks for the visit and the lovely comment.

    • joanveronica profile image
      Author

      Joan Veronica Robertson 3 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi Phyllis, coming from you this is high praise indeed! I'm so glad you liked this Hub, it's really a part of my life, I've lived with these contents all my life and I do love them! The singer, Rayen Quitral, was a favorite of my mother's , she introduced me to her music and story, I think before I was ten years old. The rest, as they say, is indeed real live history, at least for me! Thanks for the visit and the lovely comment.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 2 years ago

      What beautiful flowers! I love the white ones even better than the red. They have an interesting background. The edible seed looks like a green plum. I wonder if it can be used in pies?

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 2 years ago from Florida

      I'd sure like to see this flower up in a tree! It is quite beautiful, and your photos were wonderful to see!

      I enjoyed the history, too.

      Voted UP, etc. and shared.

    • DealForALiving profile image

      Sam Deal 2 years ago from Earth

      I really enjoyed the article and the video link. Thanks for the enlightening hub!

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      Joan Veronica Robertson 2 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi teaches12345 mary615 and DealForALiving so happy for your visits and comments! I'm so grateful to Daisy Mariposa for having shared this Hub as a birthday present for me. And I do agree, this flower is really beautiful. To look at and to touch, the petals are so thick and waxy, lovely and smooth. The legends have always inspired me, and the sopng is also beautiful. All in all, a feast whichever way you look at it. Thanks again from Chile.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      Gorgeous flower!

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