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The Top 10 Unsolved Mysteries of All Time

Updated on May 6, 2013

Alexander the Great

A bust of a young Alexander, but where does the great general lie today?
A bust of a young Alexander, but where does the great general lie today? | Source

10. What Happened to Alexander the Greats Tomb?

Alexander the Great, one of the greatest conquerors in history, and a name still admired and revered today. The most amazing thing about the Macedonian King was that he managed to forge an Empire stretching from Europe to Northern India by the age of 33, when unfortunately he succumbed to a fever, thus ending any aspirations of expansion.

After his death he was taken back to ‘his’ city, Alexandria, entombed and then put on public display, in a similar way to both Lenin and Mao. The inheritors of Alexander’s passion for Empire were the Romans. The Emperors, in particular came to regard Alexander as the epitome of bravery, strength and courage. They paid regular trips to Alexandria to pay their respects. It’s widely reputed that Julius Caesar wept when he gazed upon a statue of Alexander while in Spain, and the Roman general Pompey was so obsessed with him, that he searched high and low across the Empire for his cloak, which apparently he discovered and wore as a costume of greatness, and even went as far as to have his hair cut in the same manner. Caligula, the mad Emperor stole Alexander’s armour from his tomb and wore it for luck. If Caligula was considered mad, then Emperor Caracalla who ruled from 211-217 AD was crazy, thinking that he was the reincarnation of Alexander himself. Eventually, in 200 AD, the tomb was closed to the public out of concern for its safety, owing to the ever increasing hordes of tourists. Since then, its whereabouts have become one of the greatest mysteries of all time.

Unlocking the Mystery of the Lost Tomb.

The Biggest of all the Megafauna on Land

African Megafauna like the elephant may have survived where the fellows died out on account of them evolving alongside humans and thus being aware of their hunting capabilities.
African Megafauna like the elephant may have survived where the fellows died out on account of them evolving alongside humans and thus being aware of their hunting capabilities. | Source

9. What Caused the Extinction of the Megafauna?

Today, we live in an impoverished world in terms of large animals, otherwise known as megafauna. If you want to go and see large numbers of large animals, you must travel to Africa. If you were to look elsewhere, you’d be bitterly disappointed. But it wasn’t always this way; just 50,000 years ago there were big herds of big animal’s right across the planet except Antarctica.

Then, over a very short period many species of megafauna began to go extinct, but why did this happen? Answering this perplexing question is one of the most contentious issues in science today. The intriguing thing about the extinctions is that they seem to coincide with the expansion of modern humans out of Africa. Humans colonised Australia 40,000 years ago, shortly afterwards, nearly 1 in 3 of all large animal species disappeared. The Americas were settled 12,000 years ago, and again coincided with a grand erasing of virtually everything larger than a human. Unsurprisingly this circumstantial evidence has led many scientists to point the finger of blame squarely at us. But how could small numbers of humans armed with Stone Age weapons wreak such havoc? Questions like these have led other scientists to theorise that climate was the main cause. For others, neither hunting nor climate is a sufficient enough explanation and in recent times, another theory suggesting that disease wiped them all out has been put forward. Today, most scientists tend to favour a middle ground theory suggesting that a combination of factors including predation from humans was the most likely cause.

Profiling the Victims in North America...

...and Australia

A Couple of the Nazca's Creations

The spider
The spider | Source
The monkey.
The monkey. | Source

8. How did the Nazca People Construct Their Giant Geoglyphs?

Sometime between 300BC and 800AD, the ancient Nazca people were responsible for fashioning what are often described as superhuman depictions of their animal gods. On a 500 square kilometre plateau, these people carved hundreds of perfectly straight lines and geometric patterns by painstakingly brushing the arid sand and grit to one side. The remarkable thing about these depictions is that they only can be glanced at properly from hundreds of feet up, only at such a great height can you see more than seventy enormous pictures of both animals and humans in detail, some are more than 270 metres long.

Back on terra firma, and all you can see are paths in the dust, so how on Earth did these people construct such beautiful and breathtaking works of art without being able to see what they were doing from above. It’s one of the biggest mysteries of all and theories for their purpose range from markers for underground waterways to landing pads for UFOs. A more likely theory is that they served as a means to communicate with the gods; essentially they used the arid ground as a message board, while the night sky, home of their Gods served as their audience.

A World In Bloom

The magnolia is one of the most ancient flowering plants of all. Imagine what our world would be like today, if such beautiful things like these had never appeared.
The magnolia is one of the most ancient flowering plants of all. Imagine what our world would be like today, if such beautiful things like these had never appeared. | Source

The First Flower

A 130 million year old fossil of one of the first flowering plants, Archaefructus liaoningensis recovered from China in 2002.
A 130 million year old fossil of one of the first flowering plants, Archaefructus liaoningensis recovered from China in 2002. | Source

7. What Caused the First Flowers to Boom?

Flowers; surely the most delightful things you can possibly look at. There are few other life-forms on this planet that arouse our curiosity quite as much as flowers. But how on Earth did they first evolve? In 1879, Charles Darwin composed a letter to his friend; the botanist Joseph Hooker, stating that he couldn’t understand the sudden appearance of flowering plants in the fossil record. Unfortunately, to this day no one has really come up with a decent explanation, which is amazing considering some of the wild theories you often encounter in the scientific world, such as Life arriving on Earth via a meteorite. Yet, some 130 million years ago, the first recognisble flowers suddenly start to show in the fossil record. This is around the start of the Cretaceous Period, which of course ended with the extinction of the Dinosaurs 65 million years ago. The first flowers though bloomed in a world that was dominated by the dinosaurs, but the ancient super continent of Pangaea was now splitting into two separate land masses, Laurasia in the north and Gondwana in the south, with a big ocean, the Tethys in between.

Some experts though think that flowers are more ancient than supposed, arising as long ago as 250 million years ago, but fossil flowers have never been found from this period. Others think that several evolutionary phases occurred in quick succession, accounting for flowers’ sudden appearance. However, it happened, what can’t be disputed is just how much impact flowers have had on the planet. Without them, life today would be very different. For instance, more than 75 per cent of all the food we eat comes from flowering trees or plants. Once the first blooms appeared, the era of a green, brown and blue Earth was gone forever. Now the planet became red, yellow, orange, purple and pink.

Did the presence of pollinating insects such as bees bring about the evolution of flowers, or did the pollinators only evolve after the first flowers appeared, that's another little mystery in its own right.

The Earliest Biped

The hominid known as Australopithecus afarensis was the first of our family to be able to routinely stand and walk on two legs.
The hominid known as Australopithecus afarensis was the first of our family to be able to routinely stand and walk on two legs. | Source

6. Bipedalism in Humans?

Bipedalism or walking on two legs is the one obvious way, apart from our hairlessness that we differ from our great ape relatives. It’s a very odd adaptation it has to be said, with every good advantage, coming with an equally good disadvantage. For example, walking on two legs did free up our hands for carrying food items, but it also slowed us down significantly; not a particularly good thing to happen, considering that we were in the middle of making the transition from living in dense forest to living in open grassland savannah, an environment full of fearsome predators both alive today and long extinct.

It was once thought that the development of large brains brought on the development of bipedalism. But we now know that the first bipeds had brains the same size as chimps; so maybe raising ourselves on to two feet brought an unprecedented growth of the brain? The answer to this is also no, as these early upright hominids known as Australopithecines experienced very little brain growth over several million years. It seems that the brain growth coincided almost exactly with the invention of stone tools some 2.5 million years ago, nearly 4 million years after we first rose up onto two feet.

There are in fact many theories that try to explain the most important physical development in human history, ranging from simply freeing up the hands, to reaching up to feed from low growing savannah vegetation and maybe the most bizarre of all, the idea that we evolved bipedalism through having to wade across flooded areas of rainforest. This is a mystery that is definitely solvable; it just simply needs more evidence before anything of a concrete nature can be established.

Human Evolution on Film

The Tiny Bone That Makes Speech Possible.

A detailed drawing of the hyoid bone.
A detailed drawing of the hyoid bone. | Source

The Location of the Hyoid

The hyoid sits quite high in the throat and acts as a connector between the tongue and throat.
The hyoid sits quite high in the throat and acts as a connector between the tongue and throat. | Source

5. When did Humans Learn to Talk?

As well as walking on two legs, the other noticeable thing that marks us out as different is our peculiar way of communicating. Our ability to converse with each other in a whole range of complex languages seems so natural, but it’s all too easy to forget that for the majority of our evolutionary history, our communicative skills were limited to calls, shrieks, hoots and hand gestures. Today, complex language is intrinsic to our species, however, each one of us needs to be taught our own language by our parents or indeed any adult; we cannot instinctively speak a language, although some of us develop more of proficiency for languages than others.

So when did this peculiar, yet remarkable trait evolve. Most reasonable theories estimate that our species evolved the capacity for complex language somewhere between 50,000 and 110,000 years ago, but no one can be sure. Whenever it evolved, one thing was perfectly clear; it gave us a big advantage in terms of organising ourselves socially and also helped us to hunt more efficiently. But were we the first humans to evolve language?

In 1983, a Neanderthal bone was found in a cave in Israel, the bone was very small, barely distinguishable from the rock. But it was in fact a bone called the hyoid, we have them too and it sits in our throats and serves as a connector between the tongue and the throat. Astonishingly, the Neanderthal hyoid was virtually identical to ours. This means that they certainly had the capacity to speak. Also, the size of the openings in Neanderthal vertebrae for the nerves that control the tongue for speech are about the same as ours, so they were able to produce a wide range of sounds. Neanderthals originally evolved more than 300,000 years ago, more than 100,000 years before the first anatomical modern humans, meaning that Neanderthals were probably the first humans, and indeed the first creatures to be able to speak.

Just How Close are we to Chimpanzees?

4. The Last Common Ancestor of Humans and Chimpanzees?

The advent of modern genetics proved once and for all that we are closely related to Chimpanzees, so closely related in fact that less than 4 per cent of our DNA is different. In depth analysis of our DNA and the DNA of our closest relatives suggest that we are descended from an ape which lived sometime between four and seven million years ago. Despite the fact that no evidence has ever been unearthed o this mysterious creatures, scientists have already dubbed it Pan prior.

It’s important to remember that this creature was not a chimp although it may have closely resembled one, enough for us to describe it so, if we ever to gaze upon one. Gradually over millions of years ago this ape’s offspring developed into modern chimps and their rarer cousins, the bonobos on one hand, and early hominids- the direct ancestors of humans on the other. Who this ancestor was exactly, and where they lived, is one of the greatest mysteries of all. Experts from the time of Darwin have always assumed that our common ancestor lived in Africa, but it could have come from Asia or indeed Europe which was much warmer during the Miocene Period- the geological time period in which the human/chimp split occurred. For now, this is a mystery that’s still waiting to be solved.

One Possible Cradle of Life

Deep sea vents like this one may have given birth to the earliest life forms through the energy they give.
Deep sea vents like this one may have given birth to the earliest life forms through the energy they give. | Source

3. How did Life Evolve on Earth?

As far as we know, Earth is the only planet on which life evolved. Of course, the existence of life elsewhere is possible, but discussing the possibility of that is a whole other mystery. How on Earth did life get here? For a long time it was widely believed that God had simply created everything in its modern form in some lovely Garden of Eden- but the evidence seems to suggest that in fact life developed slowly and gradually over a seemingly infinite amount of time from a few simple organisms into many millions of complex organisms.

Is life endemic to the Earth? Did it develop in some sort of primordial chemical soup deep within the Earth at the mouth of sea-floor volcanic storm. Perhaps it was a chance spark, accidentally triggered by some sort of astonishing primordial lightning storm? Even more intriguing is the possibility that maybe all of the scientists are wrong, and that we were truly created either by highly intelligent aliens or by some divine architect like God. Again, it seems like this is a mystery beyond the range of the human spectrum, an untenable answer that will remain elusive forever.

Or Were We All Bought Here By One Of These?

Life may have been bought to Earth on one of the many meteors that crashed into the Earth after its formation, making every living thing here an alien.
Life may have been bought to Earth on one of the many meteors that crashed into the Earth after its formation, making every living thing here an alien. | Source

The Biggest Bang in History...

...But What Happened Before It?

2. What Happened Before the Big Bang?

Most scientists are in agreement that our universe began with an almighty explosion almost 14 billion years ago. It began as an invisible speck of infinite energy in the middle of nothing. Then within an instant, the universe became a huge cosmological mess, billions and billions of miles wide. In a fraction of a second, what we now call the universe was filled with all the matter necessary to make the sun, the earth, the moon, and of course us. But there’s so much more, because our telescopes only allow us to gaze at a small fraction of the universe, as a matter of fact, nobody knows how wide or deep it is.

The Big Bang itself is shrouded in mystery, in fact many remain suspicious and sceptical about whether a Big Bang occurred at all, despite the fact that scientists broadly agree that the evidence for the ultimate explosion is all around us. Indeed, a cosmologist called Robert Dickie picked up what is thought to be the lingering echo of the biggest bang in history using a highly sensitive space microphone.

But while many aspects of the Big Bang remain a mystery, what about before the Big Bang; was space just a huge empty, timeless vacuum. Or is our universe just the next in line of an unlimited number of universes. What about parallel universes? Did the Big Bang create our universe and an infinite number of parallel universes with their own different laws of fundamental physics, creating not just a universe but a multiverse? Or, perhaps scariest of all, is there some form of superior intelligence that created our universe and life on Earth; think of the Matrix on a bigger scale? Ultimately, this appears a mystery that we’ll never to solve fully, simply because we cannot travel back in time, and while scientists are attempting to recreate the Big Bang explosion, such experiments are fraught with danger, and are probably best avoided.

The Afterlife?

Is this what awaits us when we die, or is it something else, or nothing at all? It's the biggest unsolved mystery of them all.
Is this what awaits us when we die, or is it something else, or nothing at all? It's the biggest unsolved mystery of them all. | Source

1. Is There Such Thing as Life After Death?

Do we retain some sort of consciousness after we die, or do we simply cease to exist, it’s probably among the biggest mysteries of all, if not the biggest. From the animistic beliefs of hunter gatherers and early agricultural tribes to the monotheistic religions that dominate the world today- Christianity, Judaism and Islam to the Hindu belief of reincarnation to the Buddhist nirvana. Virtually every human culture in history has recorded some sort of belief in a force beyond earthly existence, and this force whether it is God, Zeus, Thor and Vishnu has promised some sort of life beyond death.

But are such claims actually true, or merely based on faith? Have we been deluding ourselves for all this time? There are those who claim to have experienced some sort of near death experience, notably in an operating theatre in a hospital. Are such claims actually true, or merely a cruel trick played by the mind? Ultimately this is a mystery beyond our capacity to solve, the only way any of us will get to know the answer is when our time actually comes. I will say from a personal viewpoint that when my time does come, I hope it’s not the end; whatever happens, I just hope to retain some essence of life whether it be here via reincarnation or somewhere else.

The Greatest Unsolved Mystery of Them All?

Which of these, do you think is the greatest unsolved mystery of them all?

See results

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    • gregas profile image

      Greg Schweizer 5 years ago from Corona, California.

      Hi JK, A very interesting and well written hub. But I believe you forgot one of the biggest mysteries of all time.

      "Where was Obama born?" Greg

    • suziecat7 profile image

      suziecat7 5 years ago from Asheville, NC

      Amazing Hub. It is interesting and comprehensive. Voted up and away.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 5 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great job of compiling information! Very interesting and well-written hub my friend!

    • K9keystrokes profile image

      India Arnold 5 years ago from Northern, California

      A simply spectacular look at the top unsolved mysteries of all time. Presented in a clear and entertaining manner. The videos are a great addition! (@greg,...your question is quite funny!)

      Cheers~

    • unknown spy profile image

      IAmForbidden 5 years ago from Neverland - where children never grow up.

      Wow, thought-provoking hub. Well done my friend!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 5 years ago from England

      Wow! this was fascinating, amazing and a lot of work put in it, rated up before I even comment! lol! I was fascinated about the plants, I remember reading somewhere that there is a flower grown next to a meteor crater, and they believe it came from some sort of seed carried on that, maybe all plants came from the same source. The big bang fascinates me, and as you mentioned I do think we come from a bubble universe, or universes. I also wonder if we do come through the singularity in a black hole, its strange that every galaxy has a large black hole in its centre, but we will have to wait and see what they come up with, amazing hub! voted across the board, nell

    • Austinstar profile image

      Austinstar 5 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

      I've always been puzzled by the Nazca lines. Some say that the designers developed some sort of hot air balloon to guide the designs and that is conceivable. A small hot air balloon would be possible.

      But why make the very very VERY long straight parallel lines? From the air they look exactly like an airport landing field for very large aircraft.

      Some say those tracts were for foot races. I can't imagine why they would want such straight lines. Why not just a starting and ending point for a race?

      At some points, the lines cross over the animal figures. Why would they do that?

      It's a mystery we probably will never solve.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 5 years ago from Massachusetts

      JK, amazing hub you have here. Very thought provoking. You clearly did your homework. Hopefully some of these will get solved in my lifetime.

    • dmop profile image

      dmop 5 years ago from Cambridge City, IN

      I find myself pondering and researching many of these mysteries regularly, but still have no real answers only more questions. Great list of the most unanswerable questions ever asked. Voted interesting, useful, and shared.

    • mollymeadows profile image

      Mary Strain 5 years ago from The Shire

      Very interesting! I've often wondered how everything in the universe could have happened by accident. It seems almost impossible to me.

      And I think the Nazca must have been more mathematically advanced than originally thought, as many ancient cultures seem to have been.

      Great hub.

    • sandonia profile image

      sandonia 5 years ago

      I had to vote other because you missed the greatest mystery of all. What happened to my car keys? :)

      Great list and interesting hub!

    • Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

      Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

      Thanks for digging up a lot of interesting stuff! I get lost in all these types of great vids - it's how I'm going to spend the rest of the evening :)

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 5 years ago from San Francisco

      tank you. everyone loves a good mystery, let alone 10!

    • christopheranton profile image

      Christopher Antony Meade 5 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

      Awesome hub, James. I voted for “what happened before the big bang” because I feel that the answer to that question should give us the answer to whether there is life after death, or not. The tomb of Alexander is probably under the sea now because a large part of the ancient city of Alexandria was put under the water by an earthquake. The great conqueror would have ended up as food for fishes.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hahaha- very true Greg- a bit inconvenient that he apparently lost his birth certificate. Cheers for popping by.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks suzie, really glad you liked it.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks billy, really appreciate you popping by my friend. Thanks very much.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks K9, yes I totally forgot about Obama, that's definitely one of the greatest mysteries of all :D

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much unknown spy :)

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      I know Nell- there are so many mysteries attached to the cosmos. To be honest I don't mind if anything of them are true, as long as we don't discover that we're living in some sort of Matrix world- that would be scary.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hi Austinstar- to be honest I hadn't heard much about the Nazca until now, it was such a fascinating subject to learn about. It really does seem that this will be a mystery that will remain ever unsolved.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks bdegiulio, really appreciate you dropping by. I, too hope that at least get solved in my lifetime.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Yep, you're right molly. Its easy for us to look down on the pre-columbian civilisations, but in a way they were more advanced than ours, because they didn't have draught animals that they could use for construction like cattle. It was all manpower- incredible.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hahaha...we've all had that mystery before sandonia. In my case at least, it's a mystery that usually solves itself. I go around the house and find that they were in my pocket the entire time hehehe.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      I know Wesman- I watched all the videos myself before posting them, and they were awesome. So I'm you'll enjoy your evening. Cheers.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Mhatter, really glad you liked it.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks chris, yes those questions do seem to be interlinked don't they. I wouldn't be surprised if Alexander is now under the sea, he's probably better off down there to be honest. Considering how many people wanted to come and see him at rest.

    • Civil War Bob profile image

      Civil War Bob 5 years ago from Glenside, Pennsylvania

      Answers: 10: It's in the NYC sewers with the alligators guarding it, #9: Aliens picked them up on their round trip to the Milky Way, #8: the Nazca were REALLY big and these were sidewalk chalk drawings of sorts, #7: FTD Florists (remember the Mercury logo?) delivered from Mount Olympus, #6: Australo-pithecus obviously wanted to play his didgeridoo while going walk about, #5: After The Fall when Eve asked Adam about her new skin clothing, "Does this outfit make me look fat?", #4: the ancestor was named Pierre, lived near modern day Paris, and changed while sitting in a cafe drinking champagne, #3: Aliens crashed a ship like the one in Star Trek that made a Big Bang when it landed over one of those vents...the rest is earth history, #2: refer back to #3, AND...#1: "Ah, there's the rub, for in that sleep of death what dreams may come must give us pause!" (Thanks, Hamlet!)

      There...mysteries solved! Check out my hubs for any other questions you might have and enjoy your day!!

    • Nettlemere profile image

      Nettlemere 5 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

      Great idea for a really interesting and well written hub JKenny.

    • robie2 profile image

      Roberta Kyle 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

      Great stuff and a riviting read:-).... although I have to admit that wondering about Alexander the Great's tomb doesn't often keep me up at night. On the other hand you definitely nail some of the all time grat mysteries of life, and you've gven me lots to lie awake and think about tonight. Great hub, well done. Loved it and voted up.

    • Man from Modesto profile image

      Man from Modesto 5 years ago from Kiev, Ukraine (formerly Modesto, California)

      Most of these "mysteries" result directly from the lie of evolution. Get past that, and answers abound. How did flowers first bloom? God made them that way. The first man, Adam, spoke just fine. Bipedalism? That ape pic in the hub is an "artists rendition" chosen from an ample collection of representations presented in a contest- which varied widely because they are based on a piece of jaw and a broken hip bone.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hahaha! Thanks for clearing that up for me Bob, really appreciate it :D

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Nettlemere, glad you liked it.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks robie2, yeah it's not one that gets your mind working is it. That's why its at number 10 hehehe. Thanks very much for your kind words, appreciate it.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      I see your point Man from Modesto, I'm an agnostic myself, although I lean more towards a belief in God. The problem I have with God creating animals as they are is why would he bother putting two tiny leg bones inside a whale. If whales were created in their present form, then the legs wouldn't have been added. The legs serve as proof for evolution, they are remnants from a time when the whales ancestors lived on land.

    • Civil War Bob profile image

      Civil War Bob 5 years ago from Glenside, Pennsylvania

      JK...those legs could show God has a sense of humor to confuse folks thinking they evolved?

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hmmm, I hadn't thought of that- maybe the big man does have a sense of humour after all?

    • ChristyWrites profile image

      Christy Birmingham 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I think life after death is the biggest mystery. We don't know until we reach the other side... A varied and well-composed list you have here!

    • profile image

      Wilbart26 5 years ago

      I love this hub! I really do love this hub! Great article! So much mysteries! God is really a very intelligent entity, he knows how to keep secrets :D

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Christy, yep, that's the one mystery that we only get to know when our time is up. Appreciate you dropping by, thank you.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Ah, I was just thinking that you know. Maybe he's got a wicked sense of humour or something.

    • profile image

      GreenEamon 5 years ago from London

      I think whether the chicken or the egg came first should be on this list?

    • AnimalWrites profile image

      AnimalWrites 5 years ago from Planet Earth

      Wow you have certainly covered some of the more mysterious and controversial events in our history in one great hub JKenny. Thanks for all the information and thoughtful insights

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Oh yeah, forgot about that one. Thanks GreenEamon, and thanks for popping by.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you AnimalWrites- I really enjoyed putting this one together so I'm grateful for your feedback. Thank you.

    • Civil War Bob profile image

      Civil War Bob 5 years ago from Glenside, Pennsylvania

      Green and JK: God made the chicken, the chicken laid an egg, and Adam had breakfast? Or...the aliens stopped off at Alpha Centuri KFC where you could get live chicken take out and dropped them off just to confuse future questioners? Happy Friday...go get some chicken or egg salad sandwiches and enjoy the day!

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Bob, you enjoy your day too.

    • davidlaw2 profile image

      davidlaw2 5 years ago

      The big question is, why can't I remember what I wanted to say? Here is thought two. I am listening to a Christian program on TV while I am writing this. According to the program, and the Bible, God created everything in six days. I forget things in less than six seconds. That is enough of my nonsense. I enjoyed you work.

      David

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you David- you're much like me then. Yeah, I learnt that in school- apparently there was a talking snake in the garden, but he must have been one of a kind, as I don't think there are many around today. Also Eve was apparently created from one of Adam's ribs- wouldn't that of hurt. Anyway, I'm spouting nonsense now, thanks again David

    • Angie Jardine profile image

      Angie Jardine 5 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ...

      Wow, JKenny ... this hub is some tour de force!

      I have voted it up/interesting/awesome and liked it on FaceBook (I don’t think I have forgotten anything?)

      I was gripped from start to finish and that is saying something for me as it is a very long hub and I have started doing that goldfish attention span thingy ... something to do with age.

      So well done ... I am truly impressed with such a clever and in-depth piece of work.

    • davidlaw2 profile image

      davidlaw2 5 years ago

      Hi JKenny:

      I saw what you point out. I decided to do some research on these things. I spent some time looking up the main words in the Bible in a Hebrew lexicon and found different words for many of the words chosen by Bible translators. By using the other words that could have been used, the Bible (Genesis) make more sense. It is an interesting project. I am not saying this to take away from your good work.

      David

      P.S. How did you get an early morning photo of my exwife?

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Angie, wow it must have been good then hehehe :) I'm really glad you liked it though. Thanks for the vote.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Cool, that sounds really interesting David. You'll have to send me that research, because I haven't been able to make sense of the Bible for years. Hahaha! Your ex-wife must have been a stunner eh?

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 5 years ago from SW England

      Great hub! Voted up and interesting. As usual, it's full of fascinating facts and figures. I was pleased to see that the magnolia is supposed to be the oldest of flowers - my favourite! Well done - a brilliant idea!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks annart, really appreciate your kind words. The magnolia is one of my favourites too, I work in a garden centre so I get to deal with magnolias a lot.

    • Nathan Orf profile image

      Nathan Orf 5 years ago

      Just one question relating to the story of Adam and Eve and the fall from Eden... Do you have any Hubs dealing with the striking similarities between The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Story of Noah's Ark, and Adam and Eve? If you look closely, they are all strikingly similar, right down to the snake and the fruit...

      Now there is an intriguing mystery; how did two completely different cultures end up with two eerily similar stories?

      And thank you for a brilliant Hub.

    • BeingPuneet profile image

      BeingPuneet 5 years ago

      Nice hub there broda... you might have collected a lot of info about this...

      and for the greatest mystery is life after death...

      have voted up and shared and do check my new hub you may find it interesting to...

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Nathan, no I'm not aware of the Epic of Gilgamesh, perhaps you could enlighten me on that. It could well be that the two cultures moulded and adapted some sort of ancestral story into a story all of their own.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you BeingPuneet, glad you liked it, and thanks for the follow and the mail too.

    • Nathan Orf profile image

      Nathan Orf 5 years ago

      Here are some links:

      www.aina.org/books/eog/eog.pdf,

      and

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epic_of_Gilgamesh.

      There is definitely a wealth of information about Gilgamesh out there that I didn't have time to check out. That being said, here is what I know; The Epic of Gilgamesh is the oldest written story known to man, on any record. It was written at least 5000 years ago, and it deals with themes of mortality, coping after the loss of a loved one, love and friendship and mankind's relationship with the gods. And it has some stark similarities to the Old Testament.

      There is an interesting documentary about the period in which it was written, called Timelife; Lost Civilizations, Whispers of Eden, or something like that. Granted, it is a high school documentary, but it is intriguing food for thought.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks for that Nathan, I'll check them out at some point. Cheers.

    • Kathleen Cochran profile image

      Kathleen Cochran 5 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      I should get college credit for reading this hub! And you should be teaching somewhere if you know all this. Fascinating work.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you Kathleen,hmmm...teaching history, I'd never given it much thought. Maybe that would be a good career for me. Really appreciate your kind words, thank you.

    • rahul0324 profile image

      Jessee R 5 years ago from Gurgaon, India

      Interesting to the core! I must say Sir that you have encompassed all the mysteries one could think about... the biggest unanswered questions of mankind...

      For me the biggest two are about the origins of life and the time before the big bang.... although I am not technically correct when I say time before the big bang.. but then... it is the biggest mystery ain't it...

      The closest I have read in an article talks about the presence of Hydrogen and Helium Atoms which initiated the big bang... but further more leads to nothing... I believe M theory can provide us with some answers as it talks of parallel universes and multiple dimensions...

      So mysterious this whole universe ( or multiverse ) is....

      Great hub

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Rahul for dropping by.

    • Peter Geekie profile image

      Peter Geekie 5 years ago from Sittingbourne

      Dear JKenny,

      Excellent research, concise information and interestingly explained.

      Thank you. Voted up.

      Kind regards Peter

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much Peter, very much appreciate your kind words. Thank you for the follow too, I look forward to reading some of your Hubs.

    • lmurilo profile image

      lmurilo 5 years ago

      Great Hub! Congrats.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Imurilo :)

    • mandarmk9 profile image

      Mandar Karandikar 5 years ago from Ratlam, India

      Interesting hub.

      Thanks for sharing the info.

      Voted up...........

      Mandar

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      No problem, Mandar, glad you liked it. Thank you for the follow and the mail, very much appreciated.

    • Distant Mind profile image

      Distant Mind 5 years ago

      An outstanding and intereting hub! Great job! Thank you, I enjoyed reading it a lot.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Distant Mind- glad you liked it.

    • Deborah Brooks profile image

      Deborah Brooks Langford 5 years ago from Brownsville,TX

      excellent writing.... what great research.. I didn't know half of this.. the Big Bang and Life are the two biggest mysteries. but wow I think they are all great..

      Thanks for a great hub

      Debbie

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Debbie, really appreciate it.

    • Daisy Mariposa profile image

      Daisy Mariposa 5 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

      James,

      Thanks for publishing this excellent Hub. It's well-researched and well-written. I learned a lot from it.

    • Jools99 profile image

      Jools99 5 years ago from North-East UK

      James, I must have missed this one first time around, sorry! What a fantastic read. Thoroughly enjoyed it from start to finish. It is well written and researched and #1 is certainly in the right spot!

      Voted up and shared.

    • Teresa Coppens profile image

      Teresa Coppens 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Awesome article James. This is one I'll have to come back and read this one again. Each of these a theories could be an individual hub in their own right. Well done!

    • shalini sharan profile image

      shalini sharan 5 years ago from Delhi

      amazing article, it actually is very interesting

      voted up

    • jennzie profile image

      jennzie 5 years ago from Lower Bucks County, PA

      Great read! These are definitely very interesting mysteries indeed, some of which I don't think humans could ever truly figure out. Voted up!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Daisy, much appreciated .

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Jools, nice to hear from you again.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Teresa, I did actually consider writing an individual hub for each one, but decided that a single hub would be better.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Shalini, nice to hear from you again.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks jennzie, in some ways I'm glad that we'll never figure out some of these, as a little mystery often makes life more interesting.

    • dwachira profile image

      [ Danson Wachira ] 5 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      This mystery - When did humans Learn to talk, is fascinating! i wonder where languages came from or who was the first human to talk. I enjoyed reading this, thanks. Voted up, interesting and shared.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hi dwachira, yep that particular mystery fascinates me too. We'll probably never know exactly when the ability to talk developed, but I am willing to wager that it occurred somewhere not too far from you in Kenya. Sigh! Must visit East Africa someday.

    • dwachira profile image

      [ Danson Wachira ] 5 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Wow! I hope so JKenny, thanks.

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 4 years ago from Missouri

      Very nice hub. Deep thinking and well researched. I always enjoy hubs which spur thinking and interaction. You've accomplished both here. Well done.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Mr Archer, I'm really glad you liked it, really appreciate your kind words.

    • Natashalh profile image

      Natasha 4 years ago from Hawaii

      This is really cool and thought-provoking! It's a far cry from our usual round-up of 'unsolved mysteries.' These are all interesting, scientific questions. Thanks for putting this together!

    • mejohnson profile image

      mejohnson 4 years ago

      Great hub & well written. I wonder if we will ever know the answers to these mysteries, especially what was before the big bang & the origins of life.

    • point2make profile image

      point2make 4 years ago

      What an excellent well researched hub. I thoroughly enjoyed reading your "top ten'. It was thought provoking and very enjoyable. Well done....voted up!

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Natashalh, I very much appreciate your feedback, especially as it took me a long time to write this one. Thanks again!!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you mejohnson, and thanks for the follow too.

    • JKenny profile image
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      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much point2make, glad you liked it.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks so much HouseBuyersUs, glad you liked it.

    • knowl profile image

      knowl 4 years ago from Tandil

      "evidence seems to suggest that in fact life developed slowly and gradually over a seemingly infinite amount of time"

      It's known the Earth was formed around 3.8 billion years ago and life started soon after that, so "infinite" is a rather strange word to use don't you think?

      Other than that, very interesting hub! It was very smart of you to remain as unbiased and objective as possible, especially regarding life after death, a sensitive subject. Voted up!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks for commenting knowl, it did seem quite a strange word to use, so I re-read the hub and basically I was comparing the creationist theory which states that Earth and life is no more than 6000 years old, while as you say science states that the Earth is billions of years old. I was talking about the seemingly infinite amount of time that has passed from then to now. Sorry if you misunderstood.

      Thanks for visiting, and take the time to read my hub in full, much appreciated.

    • Rfordin profile image

      Rfordin 4 years ago from Florida

      This was a very interesting and entertaining hub.

      Thanks for sharing.

      ~Becky

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Becky, glad you liked it.

    • profile image

      Just another guy 4 years ago

      Many of these "great mysteries" can be solved by reading the qur'an

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks for commenting.

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

      Very interesting and informative hub. I am most interested in the mystery of when flowers appeared. I never stopped to think about that. I just assumed they came when plants and trees came to earth. I never knew their origin was still a mystery. I love mysteries such as this because it proves man doesn't know everything. There are still questions we must strive to answer about this earth and our beginnings and end. I enjoyed reading this very much. Great stuff! Voted up!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Suzette. Yes I know what you mean; for me some of the greatest mysteries involve our own evolution, hence why I included 'how we evolved speech' and 'the origins of bipedalism' in this, because they are so strange and yet help define us as human beings.

    • lesliebyars profile image

      Buster Johnson 4 years ago from Alabama

      Great hub voted up and intereting.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Leslie, glad you liked it. Thanks very much for the follow too, really appreciated.

    • whalefeather2 profile image

      whalefeather2 4 years ago

      A good unsolved mystery has inspired a plethora of knowledge!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      That's a pretty good saying whalefeather, thanks for visiting.

    • Richawriter profile image

      Richard J ONeill 4 years ago from Bangkok, Thailand

      Bravo, JKenny.

      A splendidly written and well presented hub indeed!

      I thoroughly enjoyed that fascinating taste of mystery there, along with all those new facts I gleaned from this hub.

      Surely, the greatest mystery of all is (This is along the same lines as option number (2) in your voting section) "How did we come to be?" or even deeper - "What created this world of stars and planets?" Ouch ... my head hurts just contemplating it for a few seconds! ha

      Good job, my friend!

      Peace.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hi Richawriter, yes its one of those mysteries that's enough to make your head hurt; that's why I try not to think about them too much hehehe. Thanks for popping by.

    • CyberShelley profile image

      Shelley Watson 4 years ago

      Brilliant, thought provoking hub. Thank you for sharing this engaging information. Up, interesting and useful

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks CyberShelley, glad you liked it :)

    • K9keystrokes profile image

      India Arnold 4 years ago from Northern, California

      The Geoglyphs created by the Nazca people fascinate me. A really interesting read, Mr. Kenny. Sharing for sure!

      Cheers~

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hi keystrokes, yes indeed. Amazing to think that they went to all that effort just in the name of religion and without any draught animals too. It was all human power. Thanks for stopping by.

    • Kris Heeter profile image

      Kris Heeter 4 years ago from Indiana

      Very interesting! I always love a good scientific mystery:)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you Kris, very glad you liked it :)

    • profile image

      Adama Gidado 4 years ago

      This is a great hub. The greatest unsolved mystery that I voted for is life after death. I think almost any other mystery is likely to be solved than this one. Like you mentioned in the hub, almost every faith mentions life after death but no one knows what it really means. I loved the hub overall. Thanks.

    • pinkhawk profile image

      pinkhawk 4 years ago from Pearl of the Orient

      ...still a great challenge for the human race. Hope the key to the truth will be discovered one day to understand lots of things better. Thanks for waking me up from boredom, ^_^!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Adama, yes you're right, the true meaning of life after death is vague and differs according to whatever faith you follow. Me personally, I'm of the opinion that I'll find out when it happens. Hopefully it'll be something that you and I won't have to deal with for many years.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      No problem pinkhawk, thanks for dropping by. :)

    • Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

      Wesman Todd Shaw 4 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

      James you sure are hard at this, and I surely do hope you are making some decent money out of your time spent.

      I don't always comment...because I'm a scatter brained miscreant...but I've seen a lot of great hubs from you I've shared but not commented.

      I started to read the Mongol hub...then started watching the full length documentary...then something shiny caught my eye...or maybe something went "beep." Truly, it is hard to say.

      Which reminds me...I wanted to ask why there were no ads on the Mongul oriented page...but then I'm reminded, it is none of my business...

      Anyway...a body could get some really good education from your subdomain here...thanks for helping make the web less stupid....wish I could help.

      Regarding Alexander's tomb - what are the best, in your opinion, theories out there?

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Wesman, to be honest I have no idea, there's no violations I know of, so I'm just as perplexed as you are.

      Well hopefully some education body will stumble across my page and offer me a job.

      As for Alexander's tomb, my best guess is that it was either utterly destroyed by the Romans, or its resting at the bottom of the Mediterranean.

    • alifeofdesign profile image

      Graham Gifford 4 years ago from New Hamphire

      Great hub-I love mysteries and these are certainly some big ones. Great topic idea for an article and I agree with another commenter, perhaps you should be teaching.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much, maybe I should teach, but it would have to be adults, don't think I'd able to handle children hahaha! Thanks again for dropping by, appreciate it.

    • LifeisLovely profile image

      Megan 4 years ago from Clearwater, Florida

      This is definitely one of the best hubs I have read so far. I'm so glad I happened to come across it. History is one of my favorite subjects; so anytime I get to learn something new I take the chance. I also love reading about the theories and the scientific opinions. Thanks for writing a very interesting hub. You have gained a follower.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      A brilliant hub and thank you so much for sharing.

      Eddy.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you Eddy. Hope you had a good day. :)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Megan, if you love history, you'll love most of my hubs, as I'm quite an avid historian myself. If you have the time, feel free to check them out.

    • LifeisLovely profile image

      Megan 4 years ago from Clearwater, Florida

      Yes, I've read a couple so far and will continue to read your hubs.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Megan. Hope you like them.

    • ElizaDoole profile image

      Lisa McKnight 4 years ago from London

      Interesting hub, it was great to see some mysteries I'd not read about before like Alexander the Great.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks Eliza, very glad you liked it.

    • Kenja profile image

      Ken Taub 4 years ago from Long Island, NY

      One of the best Hubs yet! In a sea of sameness, nonsense and not-much, this one shines. Well written, informative, fun. Good show JKenny! KenT

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Ken. I know what you mean about the sea of nonsense, which is why I always try to write interesting hubs, so you're feedback means a lot.

    • raincitygirl profile image

      Siri 4 years ago from Vancouver

      This is really awesome - some thought provoking mysteries I didn't even know about! Great hub!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you Siri, and thanks for the follow too. Appreciate it!

    • Sydwu profile image

      Syd 4 years ago from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      Great Hub, but it's a pity you did not consider mysteries in society and cultures. For example, why did democracy origin from Greece? Why splendid civilization of China declined in the recent 2 hundred years?

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you Sydwu, while I agree with you that Greece's democracy and China's decline are mysteries, compared to the ones that I featured they seemed insignificant.

    • profile image

      Adam 4 years ago

      You forgot the craziest one- Is there other life out there besides us?

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Well yes, that could be one. But personally I think there is life out there, but whether there is any intelligent life...now that's a mystery!!

    • Daisy Mariposa profile image

      Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

      James,

      I came back to read your article again, and to wish you a Happy December 28th Birthday. Have a wonderful day!

    • MrAhmad profile image

      MrAhmad 4 years ago from Edmonton, Canada

      This is a fabulous hub! I can see that you but a lot of time and effort in to this one. Keep up the good work!

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

      Voted up and interesting. One fascinating hub. Enjoyed reading about all these unsolved mysteries. You know things are getting solved now and then perhaps these will too. Passing this on.

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 4 years ago from South Africa

      Superb article about the ten unsolved mysteries of all time, very well presented. Interesting to see that most readers consider life after death to be the most mysterious. Voted up, shared and pinned.

      Happy birthday to you, JKenny! (28/12/2012)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much MrAhmad!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much Daisy. Hopefully I will.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hi Gypsy, hopefully someday they will. Of course, the biggest mystery of all is one that we all personally solve when we pass on. Thanks for stopping by.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much Martie. Yes, well, I'm not surprised that life after death has the most votes. The ironic thing though is that in a way its one of the easiest mysteries to solve. All you have to do is die, if you somehow retain consciousness, then you know it exists.

    • Mike Robbers profile image

      Mike Robbers 4 years ago from London

      Hello, very interesting and informative hub. I have to admit though that life after death troubles me less than other mysteries like 'what women want' :) Ok, i'm joking! Happy New Year as well!

      Voted up and shared.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Haha! Now that is a mystery. One that may never be solved! :) Happy New Year to you too.

    • raciniwa profile image

      raciniwa 4 years ago from Naga City, Cebu

      i bet there were many of us who were of the life after death, there was one question our Philosophy Professor posed: if life after death is not real, then what's the purpose of our being?

      our goal in this life is to unite with that true purpose and not get lost along the way...

      :-)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Hi Raci, the meaning of life could well have been counted in this list. Answering it depends on how you think about it. From a purely genetic point of view, its surviving long enough to pass on your genes to the next generation. But being spiritual beings we need more than that. For me, its simply to lead a happy life and treat others in the same way I'd like to be treated. Thanks for stopping by.

    • joanveronica profile image

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Fantastic read! This is a good collection, all these thought provoking items in one place. I enjoyed it very much, so thank you! Voted up, awesome, beautiful and interesting. Also will share! Have a good day!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much Joan. I appreciate you taking the time to drop by.

    • joanveronica profile image

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Congrats on the 500+ followers! Have a great day!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Haha! Oh yes, I forgot about that. Thanks for that Joan. You have a great day too.

    • profile image

      joyislam 4 years ago

      Niche post. The Top 10 Unsolved Mysteries of All Time . The ironic thing though is that in a way its one of the easiest mysteries to solve. All you have to do is die, if you somehow retain consciousness, then you know it exists.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Very true, its a mystery that we all eventually solve. Its just that nobody living ever gets to hear about it. Thanks for popping by.

    • ytsenoh profile image

      Cathy 4 years ago from Louisiana, Idaho, Kauai, Nebraska, South Dakota, Missouri

      James, it is very evident you are passionate about your research and writing. Thanks for putting all this information together. It was very well presented and written and organized. I would suggest you keep writing, but it's apparent, you will. Thumbs up.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      No problem at all ytsenoh, thank you for stopping by. And believe me, I shall certainly carry on writing. Thanks again.

    • Sue Bailey profile image

      Susan Bailey 4 years ago from South Yorkshire, UK

      Very well written and presented hub. It kept me interested till the end. Thanks

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much Sue.

    • joanveronica profile image

      Joan Veronica Robertson 4 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

      Hi there, I definitely missed this one! Happily I have now read it and WOW!!! That is a fantastic Hub! Voted up, awesome, beautiful and interesting, also sharing! Isn't History (or the study of all these unknown episodes) a fantastic adventure?

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Indeed it is Joan! Thank you very much for stopping by!!

    • TammyMahan profile image

      TammyMahan 4 years ago from New York

      Great hub! There are so many unsolved mysteries you should write another hub and include some more of them! Great reading. Thanks for sharing. :)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much for popping by Tammy. Maybe I will, there's plenty of other fascinating mysteries that didn't make it onto this list.

    • keelymahaffey profile image

      Keely Mahaffey 4 years ago from Maine

      Fabulous hub! There are so many things that we take for granted. Like the flowers for instance ~ I never actually wondered how they came to be. I guess I just assumed they've always been around, which is pretty silly if you think about it. Thanks for the great read!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      I know, the amazing thing about the natural world is that it is constantly changing, even though to us it just looks the same. Thank you for popping by.

    • profile image

      PJ Van Galen 4 years ago

      Fantastic hub, man! Great research and well organized. I couldn't stop reading. I love how all the mysteries of our world revolve around development and live vs. death. As if nothing else matters than the beginning and the end. So freaking beautiful. Instant follow!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much PJ, that was kind of the angle I was going for. As the very best mysteries involve life and death in the natural world.

    • TravelinJack profile image

      Jack Baumann 4 years ago from St. Louis, Missouri

      Love this! Nothing is more exciting than ancient insolvent mysteries. Voted up and liked!

    • gail641 profile image

      Gail Louise Stevenson 4 years ago from Mason City

      I think life after death is a real good unsolved mystery. Very interesting and fun to read.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much TravelinJack!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much- I agree with you, that's why I put it at number one, because none of us knows for sure.

    • seanorjohn profile image

      seanorjohn 4 years ago

      Very intriguing. I voted for life before big bang. Really surprised at how many votes went to " life after death". Voted up

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much Seanorjohn!

    • StellaSee profile image

      StellaSee 4 years ago from California

      I've read that Neanderthal genetics are pretty similar to ours, so I can see why they would have the ability to speak a language too. Interesting article!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      I personally think that they could speak almost as well as us, it's just that they lacked the imagination or flexible thinking that we possess. When times get hard, we modified our behaviour rather than adapt to the environment like other animals.

    • klidstone1970 profile image

      இڿڰۣ-- кιмвєяℓєу 4 years ago from Niagara Region, Canada

      This is quite the compilation of information you have gathered here. You rounded up such an array of topics that I didn't know which unsolved mystery intrigued me the most. I would have to say the origin of flowers and life after death. Great job.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much klidstone, appreciate you taking the time to drop by.

    • prasadjain profile image

      Dr.S.P.PADMA PRASAD 4 years ago from Tumkur

      A very wonderful, useful, beautiful hub. unfortunately, we have to vote for only one choice!Good research,well organized and beautifully designed content. Congrats!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much. Glad you liked it!

    • Elias Zanetti profile image

      Elias Zanetti 4 years ago from Athens, Greece

      Great hub, indeed. You do some vital questions that I think will continue to puzzle humans (and scientists) for a long time. They are all great topics to consider.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks you very much Elias! Glad you liked it.

    • JPSO138 profile image

      JPSO138 3 years ago from Cebu, Philippines, International

      Very interesting and mind boggling. Your hub title remote me to read the hub and really I find this a wonderful one. Up forthis!

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 3 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much, glad you liked it!

    • ziyena profile image

      ziyena 3 years ago from ... Somewhere Out There ...

      Love a good mystery. Fun article and voted for ... Life After Death :)

      UP

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 3 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you Ziyena...love the name by the way. :)

    • Danida profile image

      Danida 3 years ago from London

      Wow, very interesting hub!

      I love love love unsolved mysteries, there's so much room to theorize! I do think that the biggest mystery is whether there is life after death, because we have absolutely no proof on the afterlife, but for every other mystery we have at least a few theories with a little possible proof.

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 3 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      That was a very interesting read. I believe that the Nazca were far more mathematically advanced in order to construct these Giant Geoglyphs than we are even today. The Nazcas were not primitive at all but rather intelligent civil engineers. In my research of my novel Parallel Realities those who came before us had a much greater capacity for intelligence than ourselves. Human being have been genetically engineered. Human beings are different to any other primates in many respects, the most striking being the statistically unique number of extinction level anomalies found in humans and no other species to have ever existed on planet Earth!

      You have inspired me to write an article titled: Were human beings genetically engineered?

      Thanks for that inspiration

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 3 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Wow, interesting comment. Personally I agree that humans have been genetically engineered, albeit in the form of domestication. I personally believe that our hunter gatherer forebears were far more intelligent than we were. After all they managed to achieve a balance with nature that seems impossible to us now. Thanks for popping by.

    • Trish_M profile image

      Tricia Mason 3 years ago from The English Midlands

      What a fascinating and thought-provoking topic! :)

      It was a toss-up as to which I should vote for; what happened before the big bang or what happens after death.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 3 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thanks very much Trish, well most people seem to be going for life after death, as it's the most relevant to us.

    • Trish_M profile image

      Tricia Mason 3 years ago from The English Midlands

      Yes JKenny, I noticed that, and it certainly is relevant to us as individuals, but what happened before the big bang ~ that is a real mystery :)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 3 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Interesting that you mention 'before the big bang' because I remember reading a series of books called 'The Neanderthal Parallax' by Robert J Sawyer that profiles an alternate universe where Neanderthals survived and developed advanced technology. Interestingly, their scientists don't subscribe to the big bang theory, and instead state that the universe has always been there. They fault they find with the big bang, is that it implies that something had to create it.

    • Trish_M profile image

      Tricia Mason 3 years ago from The English Midlands

      I'll have to check that one out :)

    • tazzytamar profile image

      Anna 2 years ago from chichester

      Your hubs always fascinate me - I like pondering all the unsolved mysteries such as these even though it's likely we'll never find the answers.

      P.s I voted for you in a couple of the fields for the hubbie awards so I hope you get something worthwhile out of it :)

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 2 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Oh cool, thanks. I've never won one before, so it'd be brilliant to win something.

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 2 years ago from Philippines

      I was expecting something completely different, and instead I got this amazing science lesson. Very interesting, and very well written.

    • JKenny profile image
      Author

      James Kenny 2 years ago from Birmingham, England

      Thank you very much :)

    • profile image

      big daddy oreo 2 years ago

      To me the biggest mystery is why more white men do not change their skin color to black. Black skin would make the average guy look stronger. Black skin is good for protection. Black skin can help with the ladies.

    • Dip Mtra profile image

      Dip Mtra 2 years ago from World Citizen

      Great hub. Voted up.

    • Peter Geekie profile image

      Peter Geekie 2 years ago from Sittingbourne

      Dear JKenny

      Thank you very much for an interesting and well researched article

      kind regards Peter

    • prasadjain profile image

      Dr.S.P.PADMA PRASAD 2 years ago from Tumkur

      I once again visited this this hub after a long lapse of time. I found it so interesting that i could not even recall that I had read this hub before. The author has taken great pains in creating a hub like this.

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 2 years ago from Northeast Ohio

      This was really interesting, James, and also fascinating. Great insight into those unsolved mysteries of all time. Voted up!

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