ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Education and Science»
  • Geography, Nature & Weather

Water Turbines

Updated on June 7, 2013

Water Turbines

Water Turbines

Volume 2, Issue 9A, June 7, 2013

Water turbines are used in or mostly at sea for fueling and generating energy for oil rigs and in some cases a remote community. The actual name of the turbine is called a hydro-electrical turbine, but it is a thermo-nuclear electrical generator that is powered by water turbines spinning at a velocity unknown by the swiftness of waves, movement of water, or by the winds moving water that are produced by rivers, streams, seas or oceans. The water turbine is a high velocity rotary engine that is powered by the movement of waves or motion of the water. It has actually been around for thousands of years when men in Egypt, Mayan, and Roman temples, in the 3rd or 4th century, introduced it to the world. A French engineer made it more modern, and thought out an energy producing wheel in the 19th century that rotated and swirled with water to create a water pipeline energy system and electrical vortex to sustain a community with water and electricity. As history will have it the Mayan temples had a circular water wheel that stood upright and was propelled by water to move to and from different sections of the temples and Mayan empire and community. It was the same type of water system used and produced for the Roman and Egyptian Empires. It is also the centerpiece of each of the respective communities or empires where water was moved and swirled into the community to quench the thirst of visitors and native people alike. Most of these communities gathered in their main centers of trade and sales to sell goods and trade with outside communities and empires that apparently shared there concepts of water systems with each other.

Normally the water turbines look like a slanted wheel in a circular shaft that spins and swirls as the water moves through and rotates the turbine and it creates energy in water or thermal energy or hydro-velocity spinning vortex of electricity.

Not only are these water turbines used for water systems but they produce electrical energy through its spinning velocity and speed for other objects or community generators. These water turbines produce hydro electrical energy to light up or produce the energy for electricity in a community, residence or business.

Although most of the turbines are seen and used to propel sea craft (propellers) they can be used to produce energy indoors. This is the most popular type of water turbine a propeller that is a fixture for water craft, sea vessels, boats, and submarines. It has a 90% energy production rate. There are also two types of water energy systems that are called reaction turbines and impulse turbines.

The most notable and amazing use of energy for thermo-nuclear and hydro-nuclear electrical energy is Niagara Falls where this system is maintained and has a dynamic, spectacular, and wonderfully scenic energy spectacle. This energy system produces approximately 2,200 kilowatts in 1893 and close to 2 million kilowatts today, and it provides energy for the communities of Queenston and Chippewa, Canada and a large part of Canada. It also provides hydro-electrical power to the American side of Lewiston Pump Generating Plant and Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant together it produces about 2.4 million kilowatts of electricity since 1958. This spectacular view of how powerful water is and the energy it produces could be seen on film. Vacations to this wonder of the world are frequent and as anyone can see the visual panoramic views of this wonder are beyond comprehension.

EBay and Amazon carry water turbine kits that you can assemble for the home or business and they can be placed in rivers and streams if available.

Water turbines

Source
Source

Water turbine

Inventor

Who is the Inventor of the Water turbine?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)