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We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua

Updated on October 27, 2015

Dislclaimer

I was sent a free copy of We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua as part of a book tour in exchange only for a honest and unbiased review of We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua.

Source

Theresa Anzaldua

Theresa Crumpler Anzaldua was born in Cleveland,later raised in Detroit, and later graduated from the University of Michigan Ann Arbor.Theresa Crumpler Anzaldua graduated with a bachelors degree in English and Philosophy and a masters degree in Philosophy.Theresa Crumpler Anzaldua worked as a corporate attorney and an enforcement attorney at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C after she graduated college.

Theresa Crumpler Anzaldua has been living more recently as a freelance writer and as a regular contributor to Seasons Magazines. We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua began as an article that Theresa Crumpler Anzaldua wrote for Seasons Magazines about a veteran's amazing World War II story.

So far Theresa Crumpler Anzaldua has only written:

  • We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua

Review

First off just as I wrote in the disclaimer: "I was sent a free copy of We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua as part of a book tour in exchange only for a honest and unbiased review of We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua."

I have never watched the war movie and documentaries on major world wars, but my grandfather was at D-Day so when I cam across this book I thought it might be an interesting read for me. I do typically enjoy fiction book more that non-fiction books.

We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua begins with the Great Depression. In fact the whole first chapter and part of the second is focused on the Great Depression, the mind state of America, and the lack of jobs. As the book continues onward it covers topics like the Pearl Harbor Attack and events from World War two. The book then branches out to follow the lives of different people and their role during the war. Out of all of them my favorite was the female Army Air Forces nurse who made helping veterans her life's work. The nurse was a nice change from the other lives this book followed because she was a female. Being female myself I found her outlook during the war the most interesting to me.

We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua was an interesting read, but it was also very slow in the beginning and it was rather dry at times. I had this impression going in that We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua would be a fast paced book with real life stories that were told almost like miniature movies so I was slightly disappointed when that was not the case. If anything this book reads like a rather interesting history book with real stories from real people about their lives during the war. I learned a lot about what is what like for those brave people who were involved in the war; I found the layout conductive to separating the different perspectives from each other.

Overall if you are a history buff that you will greatly enjoy We Had A Job To Do: World War II Through the Eyes of Those Who Served by Theresa Anzaldua, but if you are not you might want to seek out a historical fiction book on the time period instead of a non-fiction book like this one.

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