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US History of American Foundation Documents and Flags

Updated on October 24, 2016
Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Ms. Inglish has 30 years of successful experience in medicine, psychology, STEM courses, and aerospace education (CAP).

Revolution and a New Nation

The First Flag of the USA

The Grand Union Flag, flag of the United Colonies of North America and the first flag of the USA.
The Grand Union Flag, flag of the United Colonies of North America and the first flag of the USA.

The Revolution was effected before the war commenced.

The Revolution was in the hearts and minds of the people.

— President John Adams, 1818

Compelling History in the New World

American history is an exciting body of information, especially for me since, some of ancestors participated in its forming beginning with the French and Indian War, Pontiac's War, and the Battles of Forts Pitt and Duquesne. The American Revolution came soon afterward.

The Two Forts

Click thumbnail to view full-size
France's Fort Duquesne, built in 1754 and destroyed in 1758.Fort Pitt, built by England in America in 1758 to replace the previous fort that was leveled by British forces.
France's Fort Duquesne, built in 1754 and destroyed in 1758.
France's Fort Duquesne, built in 1754 and destroyed in 1758. | Source
Source
Fort Pitt, built by England in America in 1758 to replace the previous fort that was leveled by British forces.
Fort Pitt, built by England in America in 1758 to replace the previous fort that was leveled by British forces.

Flags of the New Nation

Additional Flags of the New Nation

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Used in 1767,it was called "the rebellious stripes flag" with 9 stripes indicating colonies expected at the Stamp Tax Congress meeting.Naval Jack of the United States Culpeper Minute Men Flag, 1775George Washington's personal flag though the American Revolutions.Continental Colors, June 1, 1776.National Flag from June 17, 1777.Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777 in Vermont.Raised on ship by Captain John Paul Jones on the British "Serapis" during the most famous Revolutionary War  naval battle.
Used in 1767,it was called "the rebellious stripes flag" with 9 stripes indicating colonies expected at the Stamp Tax Congress meeting.
Used in 1767,it was called "the rebellious stripes flag" with 9 stripes indicating colonies expected at the Stamp Tax Congress meeting. | Source
Naval Jack of the United States
Naval Jack of the United States | Source
Culpeper Minute Men Flag, 1775
Culpeper Minute Men Flag, 1775 | Source
George Washington's personal flag though the American Revolutions.
George Washington's personal flag though the American Revolutions. | Source
Continental Colors, June 1, 1776.
Continental Colors, June 1, 1776.
National Flag from June 17, 1777.
National Flag from June 17, 1777.
Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777 in Vermont.
Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777 in Vermont. | Source
Raised on ship by Captain John Paul Jones on the British "Serapis" during the most famous Revolutionary War  naval battle.
Raised on ship by Captain John Paul Jones on the British "Serapis" during the most famous Revolutionary War naval battle. | Source

The Betsy Ross, First Documented Use in 1792

Betsy Ross Flag, used only in New York
Betsy Ross Flag, used only in New York | Source

The Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence was issued by the Second Continental Congress of the United Colonies of North America at the Pennsylvania State House (Philadelphia's Independence Hall) July 4, 1776. At the same time, we became the United States of America.

Declaration of Independence

Image of the original document in the National Archives.
Image of the original document in the National Archives. | Source

Declaration House, Where Thomas Jefferson Worked

Home of Jacob Graff Jr., where Thomas Jefferson rented two rooms in which to draft the Declaration (NPS.gov public domain)
Home of Jacob Graff Jr., where Thomas Jefferson rented two rooms in which to draft the Declaration (NPS.gov public domain)

Constitution of the United States of America

The Preamble to the Constitution of the United States of America:

.

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

The Preamble Song - from School House Rock

The Great Peace of the Iroquois Confederacy

Senate Resolution 331, from the 100th Congress in 1988 (The Reagan Years): The US Senate acknowledges, “the confederation of the original thirteen colonies into one republic was influenced …by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself.”

Wampum belt and flag of the Iroquois Confederacy.
Wampum belt and flag of the Iroquois Confederacy.

Foundation Documents

America, or the USA, was first formed by these states: New Hampshire, Massachusetts bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (together these formed 1 state), Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.

This Hub will present some important aspects of the forming a new nation called the United States of America. It will display information about and links to the nation's foundation documents, other writings about these documents, and images and links regarding the various American national flags.

Remember that most immigrants to America during the founding of the Colonies came from what is the united Kingdom and it has been thought that this region was more liberal than the rest of Europe politically, joined in thought by The Netherlands. As far as religion is considered, most of the immigrant practiced some form of Calvinism [in protest to the Anglican Church at home].

Calvinism rather emphasized both divine and secular contractual relationships and this appears in the USA's founding documents as well - we see God mentioned and we see secularism applied as well.

This is all considered under Constitutional law and its practice and there are continuing arguments in the 21st century about whether or not America is a Christian Nation, a nation of Christians, a deist nation, a secular nation, or just what it is. Many faiths fill the borders of America. At any rate, America stemmed from a social order emphasizing individual rights and social mobility.

Some of the most important Founding Documents of the Untied States of America, most of which are held in the National Archives, and their immediately ensuing papers include:

In the Articles of Confederation, Article IV states that "paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice (are) excepted" from the freedoms and varieties of immunity offered by the States. If you were poor or a drifter, you had no rights.

It is also interesting that The Articles of Confederation, Article IX, provided that Canada was permitted to join the United States:

Article XI. Canada acceding to this confederation, and adjoining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this Union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States.

This Article sets a sort of precedent for a permitted joining of Canada, USA, and Mexico into one large community, as has been suggested for some years. Canada did not become a Nation until around 1846. Previously, Canada was a colony of England and was fought over by the French, Mohawks and English - and others.

Spacial Case: The Acadians

Many Acadians, French settlers in Canada, would not leave when the British threw Acadians out of Nova Scotia in 1760. In fact, they went to New Brunswick and applied guerilla warfare (like the Swamp Fox) to the enemy.

It took 5 years, until 1765, to convince the Acadian militia to lay down their arms. It also took the combined efforts of the British, the Americans, and the French Officers other than this militia to convince the Acadians to cease fire.

These settlers Canada left reluctantly, but the rest of the Acadians had been driven all the way to New Orleans, their farms and possessions burned by the British. Through intermarriages, the French became the Cajuns and the families are still trying to trace lost members today.

© 2008 Patty Inglish

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    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 10 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      Thank you Peter.

    • Peter M. Lopez profile image

      Peter M. Lopez 10 years ago from Sweetwater, TX

      Fantastic hub, Patty.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image
      Author

      Patty Inglish 10 years ago from USA. Member of Asgardia, the first space nation, since October 2016

      I'm glad to see you write that you like the series. There is much more to come.

    • profile image

      Wehzo 10 years ago

      Very good hub Patty. To say this series is interesting would be an understatement. It's chock full of information, thanks for sharing this.

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