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"What it means to be a hero" Lesson Plan

Updated on May 5, 2015
Source

Theme: Everyone Can Be A Hero

Objectives:

  1. Students will be able to name three qualities of a Hero, including that heroes choose to help their communities.
  2. Students will be able to identify at least one other person who has made the choice to help his or her community.
  3. Students will be able to make a list of five ways to help and make a difference in their communities.

Agenda:

Warm-up (10 min.)

Introduction (10 min.)

Examples of Heroes (15 min.)

Connection (10 min.)

Debrief/Reflection (15 min.)

Breakdown

Warm-up: Pick a short, simple warm-up game that your students will enjoy

Introduction:

What is a Hero? First, ask your students what they think a hero is.

· A hero is anyone who can and does make a difference in their communities.

· A hero chooses to help the community.

· A hero is open to the differences between community members and is willing to listen to other ideas.

· A hero is a positive role model for others in the community.

· A hero does the right thing.

Examples of Heroes

Batman and Superman/other “heroes” – Batman has no superpowers, but

chooses to help the community

Examples of well-known heroes

· Martin Luther King, Jr. (he promoted noble ideas and actions, stood up to opponents, worked to do the right thing)

· Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony (stood up to men for women’s rights, though few other women were doing so and there were many restrictions on women)

· Barack Obama (clip of speech?)

Connection

Have students fold a piece of letter-size paper into four squares. For the first square, have them draw, write or represent their favorite superhero. For the second, have them represent their favorite well-known hero, like Mother Teresa. For the third, have them represent their favorite community hero, like a teacher or firefighter. For the last, have them draw or write about themselves. For all the squares, make sure the students include reasons why the people/others they have chosen are their favorites, and why they are a hero.

Who are other people you know who make the choice to help their

communities? Why?

· Teachers, police officers

· Volunteers (they make the choice to make a difference, even though they don’t get paid)

Does choosing to serve your community make you a hero? Can middle-

schoolers be heroes?

Debrief/Reflection

Make a list of 5 things you can do to help your community – five ways in which you can be a hero like Batman.

Collect the worksheets

Comments

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    • profile image

      devel 

      6 years ago

      cool

    • profile image

      Caleeta 

      7 years ago

      Wow that is truly amazing,bravo!

    • profile image

      tony d 

      7 years ago

      a hero is a sanwich

    • profile image

      mays 

      7 years ago

      lok great i will try it

    • profile image

      paulo 

      9 years ago

      excellent!balak obama

    • kartika damon profile image

      kartika damon 

      9 years ago from Fairfield, Iowa

      Excellent!

    • glassvisage profile imageAUTHOR

      glassvisage 

      9 years ago from Northern California

      Thanks everyone, and for the added tips, Aya. You always have such great advice... I almost feel like I shouldn't make the distinction to discourage my students from being upstanding citizens :)

    • fishskinfreak2008 profile image

      fishskinfreak2008 

      9 years ago from Fremont CA

      Excellent description of heros. Thumbs up

    • Aya Katz profile image

      Aya Katz 

      9 years ago from The Ozarks

      Glassvisage, looks like a great lesson plan. Keep us apprised of how it goes.

      It would be a good idea to distinguish what the difference is between a fine, upstanding citizen who is not a hero and someone, who may or may not have a record of good citizenship, but who is a hero by virtue of having performed a heroic deed.

      Heroism is so much more than just being a good person who performs his job well and is kind to others. I hope you help your students make the distinction between people who put their physical safety on the line for the greater good and others, who are also good people, but have never done that.

    • Netters profile image

      Netters 

      9 years ago from Land of Enchantment - NM

      I like it! Thank you.

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