davenmidtown profile image 87

What is the difference between a hypotheses and a theory?


In the media, Internet, and even in science these two terms are used as if they can be interchanged. Why is it that they should not be interchanged in everyday conversations. What can we teach the reader about how properly to use these two terms?

 

sort by best latest

krillco profile image93

William E Krill Jr (krillco) says

You can help the HubPages community highlight top quality content by ranking this answer up or down.

4 years ago
 |  Comment
  • davenmidtown profile image

    David Stillwell (davenmidtown) 4 years ago

    so then there can be weak theories or theories with flaws?


  • See all 2 comments
BlissfulWriter profile image87

BlissfulWriter says

You can help the HubPages community highlight top quality content by ranking this answer up or down.

4 years ago
 |  Comment
  • davenmidtown profile image

    David Stillwell (davenmidtown) 4 years ago

    it seems like a read somewhere or maybe heard it some place... that in science there is nothing sadder than a theory ruined by a single awkward fact...


  • See all 2 comments
profile image60

jaybird2k8 says

You can help the HubPages community highlight top quality content by ranking this answer up or down.

4 years ago
 |  Comment
  • profile image

    Courtney Burke 4 years ago

    No. The question comes first. The hypothesis is the proposed answer to the question. The experiment seeks to validate the hypothesis. The theory is formed from repeated results.

snerfu profile image82

Vivian Sudhir (snerfu) says

You can help the HubPages community highlight top quality content by ranking this answer up or down.

4 years ago
 |  Comment
wandererh profile image86

David Lim (wandererh) says

You can help the HubPages community highlight top quality content by ranking this answer up or down.

4 years ago
 |  Comment
  • davenmidtown profile image

    David Stillwell (davenmidtown) 4 years ago

    Is scientific theory the same as a scientific fact... or does that cross a line into what is considered a law... i.e the law of gravity?


  • See all 4 comments
profile image0

Courtney Burke says

You can help the HubPages community highlight top quality content by ranking this answer up or down.

4 years ago
 |  Comment
  • davenmidtown profile image

    David Stillwell (davenmidtown) 4 years ago

    @ Courtney Burke: awesome answer... Sadly, I have hear these terms interchanged in a science setting... It is usally a clear sign that whomever is talking may not be the expert that they claim to be. I also hear theory used extensively in politics.