savvydating profile image 82

"Give me a child until he is seven and I will give you the man." Do you agree with this philosophy?


Are you much the same now as you were then? Is this statement saying something deeper about how a child's development affects the rest of their lives? Do we change over time? I am interested in your thoughts, humorous or otherwise.

 

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MickS profile image77

Best Answer MickS says

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4 years ago
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Clark Cook (moonfroth) says

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  • MickS profile image

    MickS 4 years ago

    The quote is much older than that, attributed to, I believe, a one Francis Xavier, a 16c Jesuit.


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Lor's Stories says

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Jim Miller (JimTxMiller) says

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  • savvydating profile image

    savvydating 4 years ago

    Early Life Experiences: The brain exhibits a high degree of circuit plasticity during early development, and neural activity during this “sensitive period” of development can promote lifelong changes in neural circuits. (Gist from the site) Thanks!

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Isa28 says

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Kevin Peter says

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    savvydating 4 years ago

    Perhaps not so perfect, but at least they have a better chance (in hell) of developing properly, without the constant uphill battle. I've worked with abused children for whom the war was lost, although they could win an occasional battle.