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Recycled art and design made of disposable cutlery

Updated on August 25, 2009

an installation of plastic spoons

Detail of "Plastic Garden" 2004.  Artist: Lea Turto, Finland
Detail of "Plastic Garden" 2004. Artist: Lea Turto, Finland

Thease products and art nstallations are made from plastic spoons, knives and forks. Usually thease are going to the garbage after they are only used once.
Thease five artists and designers has arose into sight on international media during 2008-09: Artists from England, Finland, Japan, Portugal and a group of students of Kington Unniversity.

Some sources claim that 100 billion individual disposable pieces of plastic cutlery are used and disposed of each year around the globe. Disposable plastic cutlery can take an estimated 500-1000 years to break down in a landfill into smaller components.
With people becoming aware about the environmental impacts of most items of daily use, artists and designers have sought an opportunity to use all that trash to make exquisite pieces of art.

Furniture made from recycled plastic stirrers

Spoon collection 2009.     Studio Veríssimo results from the collaboration of Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, Portugal.photography by Ricardo Faria.
Spoon collection 2009. Studio Veríssimo results from the collaboration of Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, Portugal.photography by Ricardo Faria.
Spoon lamp 2008. Studio Veríssimo: Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, Portugal.      photography by Ricardo Faria.
Spoon lamp 2008. Studio Veríssimo: Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, Portugal. photography by Ricardo Faria.
Spoon collection 2009.     Studio Veríssimo results from the collaboration of Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, Portugal.photography by Ricardo Faria.
Spoon collection 2009. Studio Veríssimo results from the collaboration of Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, Portugal.photography by Ricardo Faria.

Isn’t there something that we can do to get better use out of all these toss-away coffee spoons?

The objective was with this waste to create a product line, spoon collection - tells Studio Verissimo. Spoon Collection '09' is a series of geometric home furnishing designs composed from thousands of melted plastic spoons that are used just once to stir coffee before being chucked. The designers have crafted everything from chandeliers to chairs from the same raw material. This collection makes a huge impact visually and environmentally.

Claudio and Telma - Studio Verissimo - want to make people also happy with their designs

Studio Veríssimo is the collaboration of Cláudio Cardoso and Telma Veríssimo, both young and up coming designers from Portugal. They have exhibited their electic, conceptually driven and design work in Italy, the U.S.A., Japan, and Holland. In addition to finding innovative ways to re-use and recycle throw-away materials.

Disposable spoon art by Daisuke Hiraiwa.
Disposable spoon art by Daisuke Hiraiwa.
Jill Townsley, Exhibited: 2008-09  Second Lives – Remixing The Ordinary, The Museum of  Art And
Jill Townsley, Exhibited: 2008-09 Second Lives – Remixing The Ordinary, The Museum of Art And
Jill Townsley, Exhibited: 2008-09  Second Lives – Remixing The Ordinary, The Museum of  Art And
Jill Townsley, Exhibited: 2008-09 Second Lives – Remixing The Ordinary, The Museum of Art And
Jill Townsley, Exhibited: 2008-09  Second Lives – Remixing The Ordinary, The Museum of  Art And
Jill Townsley, Exhibited: 2008-09 Second Lives – Remixing The Ordinary, The Museum of Art And
Jill Townsley.  The spoons, which are typically recognized as culinary utensils, have been taken out of their original context, and are now associated with the construction of something beautiful.
Jill Townsley. The spoons, which are typically recognized as culinary utensils, have been taken out of their original context, and are now associated with the construction of something beautiful.

“I think one of my design roles is to change the daily fixed values into positive senses,” explains Daisuke Hiraiwa

Japanese born, London-based architect and designer Daisuke Hiraiwa takes disposable plastic spoons, forks and even toothpicks, to create stunning contemporary artwork from common everyday objects.

Temporary quality art of Jill Townsley

Jill Townsley, a London-based artis built last year a pyramid constructed out of 9,273 plastic spoons and 3,091 rubber bands. Over time, the rubber in the band perishes and the unit collapses. The whole sculpture is then undermined and experiences a random decay.

Temporary quality of art and anticipates the moment when the rubber bands break, cut a dash in the exhibition “Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary,” Exhibited: 2008-09, The Museum of Art And Design, New York.

Jill and a small army of helpers constructed the piece on-site over the period of a week with the intention that, once put together, the piece would slowly fall apart. As shown in this video: http://www.artbabble.org/video/jill-townsley-deinstallation

Plastic Garden - funerals of the nature

Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 1998, Finland
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 1998, Finland
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 2002, Finland  foto: Lea turto
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 2002, Finland foto: Lea turto
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 2002, Finland  foto: Lea turto
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 2002, Finland foto: Lea turto
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 2002, Finland  foto: Lea turto
Lea Turto: Plastic Garden 2002, Finland foto: Lea turto
Skeleton made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott
Skeleton made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott
Skeleton made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston
Skeleton made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston
Skeleton made from detail of the photo: plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston.
Skeleton made from detail of the photo: plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston.
Skeleton made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston
Skeleton made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston

1998 Visual artist Lea Turto, from Finland chose a black baby carriage as a symbol for death, when she started to build first Plastic Garden installation. It was situated in a park belonging to the Church.

Here are some photographs of installation of 12,000 plastic spoons, knives and forks during
-98 - 2004.. This is site spesific art. The message of this works is connected with is surrounding; a church, funerals, graves and groving grass. - The round form belongs to installation situated in the long term hospitals yeard..

The public also tooked part in "planting" these plastic flowers. They just came and started to do their own installations. Thease works was momentary and changing all the time. Grass grows over them in three weeks. Nature wins plastic replikas! After that artists picked them up, washed and made a new installation.

Lea Turtos One concerns was If we try to dominate Nature, what will happen? Are we going to replace everything with cute plastic replikas!

This skeleton by London-based Kingston University students has arosed discuss in international media in july 2009.

This skeleton, a comment on the inequality of access to food and resources around the world, was made from plastic cutlery by Laura Bowman, Jamie Breach, Ashley Maine, Elliott Mariess and Lewis Woolner of Kingston.

sources

 

Comments

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    • profile image

      lee yan chng 6 years ago

      wah!very creative and plastic spoons can be so beautiful.

    • profile image

      cutie 6 years ago

      cool

    • profile image

      Nghi Vollmer 7 years ago

      my favorite one is the Red Furniture made from recycled plastic stirrers. It's a beautiful comtemporary piece of furniture.

      http://nvarts.mosaicglobe.com/

    • profile image

      Diane pondr 7 years ago

      Zert@sbcglobal.net. Looking for artists to do show concerned environmentally

    • profile image

      טל 8 years ago

      ????? ????? ?? ????? ??????? ????? ????? ??

    • Catherine R profile image

      Catherine R 8 years ago from Melbourne, Australia

      What fabulous sculptures. You can make something beautiful out of just about anything if you have the vision. I remember in Cape Town where I used to live there was a restaurant which had the most wonderful chandelier made of old coke bottles. Nice hub.

    • alittlebitcrazy profile image

      alittlebitcrazy 8 years ago

      Very creative! Great hub! There really can be beauty in everything, huh?

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