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Butterflies & Butterfly Plants of Central Florida

Updated on March 3, 2012

Posters for Butterfly Gardeners

If you live in Central Florida, you are at the crossing roads for all those migratory birds and butterflies. For example, you will see many Monarch Butterflies during the Fall and Spring as they pass through your area on their migratory routes. But we also have a lot of resident butterfly and moth species that will frequent your backyard such as Swallowtails and Gulf Fritillary.

You could have dozens more butterflies visit your home if you have something to attract them. The two proven methods is to provide your Lepidopteran friends with Adult Butterfly Food (namely flowers) and Plants that they can lay their eggs on and feed their caterpillar offspring. The butterfly adults will fly and feed on many flower varieties, but the caterpillars are often very specific to a plant species

But what are the most common butterflies? What are the most common plants for nectar and larvae food? And, could we avoid all of that scientific names and Latin mumbo jumbo?

Here are 5 posters of butterflies and butterfly plants that frequent the Central Florida area. The butterflies are identified by their common names (and scientific names, for those interested). The posters are for you to view and print if you like. They are sized for tabloid paper (11" x 17") printing. Enjoy!

POSTER: Butterflies & Butterfly Plants of Central Florida

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    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 5 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Oh this sounds great! Voted up. Welcome to hubpages!

    • profile image

      Mardan59 4 years ago

      So I am wondering, where do all our Central Florida Monarchs go around June 1st, in our garden, they disappear virtually overnight and we don't see them again until about the end of September. Nobody I have asked thus far seems to know, do they move to a more Northern location?

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