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This Chickadee is Popular and the Call is Famous.

Updated on June 12, 2015

Read first:

For the meanings of bird parts which you do not understand in this Hub, see my bird glossary.

If you want what is not there, please let me know so that I may add it into the glossary.

Chickadees (left) and Titmice (right)

Chickadees and Titmice:

There is a family called Paridae which includes both the titmice and the chickadees. They come to the feeders and will also eat food from your hand - when they prefer certain seeds over natural food. There are about 51 species which breed around the world, but in North America it is only about 11 or 13 species.

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus
Poecile atricapillus | Source

Description of the Black-capped Chickadee:

The first one to be introduced is a popular one, at least to those in the north range of NA.

It is the Black-capped Chickadee, (Poecile atricapillus). This bird covers the northern half of North America and parts of Canada. It is best described by saying that its size is usually from 4.25” – 5.75” (10.795 – 14.605 cm). Whenever it has its wings spread fully open they reach 8” from tip to tip. It is a very small bird and very light since the male and female are different sizes. Its weight is between 0.32 - 0.49 oz. (9 - 14 g). It has a bill which is only 0.31” – 0.37” (8 – 9.5 mm) long. Its tarsus measures 0.63” – 0.67” (16 – 17 mm) and it has a tail that is 2.3” – 2.5” (58 – 63 mm) in length.

The description of this bird is simple because both the male and the female look basically the same with very little differences. The males are sparsely bulkier, and longer, than the females. Beginning on the top of its head it has a black cap, and a throat to match, and both of its cheeks are white. The top of its back is a (light) furry gray but as you go down a ways the feathers are a light black; then just above the tail it becomes a few thin stripes of white/black. Following the back is a part which comes to a point and overlaps the tail and is a medium black, then comes the black tail. The underparts are only a dull white and the wing feathers have white along the edges. It is difficult to separate the Black-capped Chickadee from the Carolina Chickadee but it is possible. I will explain the differences between the two in the Carolina Chickadee Hub.

Have you seen a Black-capped Chickadee?

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Chickadees at feeders

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Sightings at backyard winter bird feeder in Vermont: Black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) [Sunflower seed] Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) feeding on suet, Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area, Quebec, Canada.
Sightings at backyard winter bird feeder in Vermont: Black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) [Sunflower seed]
Sightings at backyard winter bird feeder in Vermont: Black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) [Sunflower seed] | Source
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) feeding on suet, Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area, Quebec, Canada.
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) feeding on suet, Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area, Quebec, Canada. | Source

Hand fed chickadee

Daily Diet:

Let us talk about its daily diet and its searching for food.

In the summer a considerable part of what they eat are insects – particularly caterpillars. When they go hunting for these insects it is by one of three ways: hopping along the tree branches; hanging upside down on the branches; or hovering – they make short flights to catch insects in the air. They still eat seeds though because Black-Oil Sunflower cannot always be found - or they like to crack the shell - and suet are populars.

In the winter seeds and berries shift into the more important slot, but insect eggs and pupae are still part of the list if they can be found. They go to bird feeders for black-oil sunflower seeds. I use to watch them as they took one of these black-oil seeds and flew up to a tree branch to hold it with their talons as they cracked it with their bill. Once they had eaten the inside, they came back for another one.

Black-capped Chickadees are not the only species in the Paridae family who frequently cache their seeds and sometimes the insects too. They store the items in different locations - one at a time - which may be in bark, in leaves, in conifer needles gathered in clusters, or even in knotholes. There is one catch; they can only remember where they put everything for up to 28 days. In a period of 24 hours, if it is the first 24 hours, the birds are able to recall the comparable quality of the items which they stored.





Can you feed a chickadee (or a titmouse) by hand?

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Click thumbnail to view full-size
Altricial (helpless) young birds of an unidentified species.
Altricial (helpless) young birds of an unidentified species.
Altricial (helpless) young birds of an unidentified species. | Source

Nest and Eggs:

Nest -

They search trees until they find holes in the trees that they like and want to place their nests into, which must be between 3.3’ – 23’ (1-7 m) above the ground. They look for their holes in one of three ways: 1) perhaps the pair will uncover the hole side by side of each other; or they will use an everyday hollow area; perhaps even – sometimes – an outdated woodpecker’s nest. A nesting box is another option for this species. April (late April) to June is when their nesting season occurs. Only the female is responsible for building the nest, the male has nothing to do with it. What the nest is made with includes all coarse elements on the outside – moss or bark strips; for the lining more fine elements are used – like mammal hair.

Eggs -

The color of this chickadee’s eggs are white and they have reddish brown spots, in a goup, at the wider end of the egg. The approximate size of the eggs are 60” x 48” (1.52 x 1.22 cm). The size of each of their clutches is usually 6 – 8 eggs. The female handles the incubation and feeding the young on her own and that is for 11 - 14 days. While the male takes care of feeding her. When there is company at the nest - an unwanted guest, for instance - then you may hear a sudden ‘violent’ hiss – sounding like a snake – hopefully to frighten away any predators. Even though the young can still be fed as before, even though they are skilled to capture their own food in a period of about a week following their leaving the nest.

When the time comes for the eggs to hatch, the young ones emerge from the eggs without any feathers (altricial) and also with their eyes still closed. After hatching, the young are fed by both the male and the female adults. Following 12 – 16 days after hatching the young ones leave the nest. Mainly since the parents stop feeding them inside of the nest and only serve them food from the outside.

Black-capped Chickadees usually have a clutch generally one time per year but if there are problems – say the eggs are stolen or the nestlings die - then a second clutch is always achievable. When the age of the young reaches one year then the first breeding has been reached. Twelve years is the utmost lifetime that has been reported but it seems that only half that long is what most of the birds actually live.

These chickadees are cordially monogamous and because of that reproduction is helped along with the males providing to it considerably. If you do not remember, during the laying and incubation periods, the males fed the females largely. Once the hatching has happened then the males are the primary providers. The females become the nest keepers when the nestlings become older. Primary males are preferred by the females, and better reproduction progress is closely similar to the higher ranking of the male.

They may also crossbreed with Carolina Chickadees or Mountain Chickadees when their ranges extend over each other. Crossbreeding with Boreal Chickadees has also been recorded, but it turns out to be more rare.

Black-capped fee bee Call

Song and Call:

Song -

The songs and calls of this chickadee are extremely difficult to understand. There are specific classes – thirteen to be exact - of songs/calls which are in a certain order - many of which are complicated and can correspond to different sorts of messages. Chickadees’ songs/calls are likely because they are saying that they are changing habituation to their residence: They live and feed in heavy vegetables and greenery. Even when the group is closely combined singular birds are apt to be out of each other’s optical field.

The Black-capped has a song which is plain and easy. It is a distinct sound like a flute of two notes which are similar in tempo. The only difference being that the first note is basically an entire level above the second note. You can identify this from the Carolina Chickadee’s fee-bee fee-bay; the bottom notes are almost the same except the upper (fee) notes are removed from the Black-capped song. The song of the Black-capped is only bee-bay.

When you hear the song, it is being sung when the males are almost by themselves; when I say ‘by themselves’ I mean that there are no other chickadees around, not even their own partners.

Call -

Do you know how this bird got its name? It received its name because of the call which it is mostly well-known by – chic-a-dee-dee-dee. Even though it sounds clear, the call is amazingly complicated. Studies have been done showing that at least four different groups exist that can be organized in various methods to exchange messages about the arrangement of the flock activity due to threats from predators. The degree of threats from predators which are close at hand shown by a current survey, indicated by the number dees in the call. It was brought into being, by results of over 5,000 alarm calls from chickadees, that the alarm calls which are provoked because of the small, dangerous raptors caused a briefer break between chick and dee and resulted in having extra dees – basically it was four rather than two.There was even one circumstance where the main threat to the chickadees - the pygmy owl - had a warning call which included 23 dees. Another bird that makes a call which is very much alike is the Carolina Chickadee. The difference being that the Carolina’s call is more rapid and higher in tone of sound.

A quantity of other calls and sounds can also be made and one of them is a gargle noise which is basically made by males to imply that they will be attacking another male – usually when they are feeding. Another time this is used is during sexual relations. One culture was analyzed and two to nine of 14 discrete notes were included. From this they concluded that certain noise was in a group with the most difficult to understand calls.

Range Map

Black-capped Chickadee range map
Black-capped Chickadee range map | Source

Range and Habitat:

Range -

Starting at New England they cover from there to Alaska to just below the center of the US in most areas. On the west they go down into parts of California, in the center of the country they go to New Mexico, and Missouri. In the winter they go to the Maryland area, Texas and I even heard into Mexico. In the north, they are in Canada – again from coast to coast – and even in Newfoundland.

Habitat -

Usually you will find them in what are only deciduous woods but they may also be found in mixed woods – woods which are both deciduous and conifer. Other options are open woods, parks and even suburban areas. Habitat isolation is the primary point that sets the Black-capped Chickadee apart from the Boreal Chickadee in the Pacific northwest (both of these species definitely desire the coniferous forests). Elevation also sets the Black-capped Chickadee apart from the (higher) Mountain Chickadee in the Western Mountains; and the (lower) Carolina Chickadee in the Great Smokey Mountains.

Conservation and interesting Facts:

These chickadees are common and their total societies have been getting larger since 1966 as presented by the North American Breeding Survey. Between 1966 and 2010 their western dwellers lessened somewhat, but due to a growth in eastern societies that loss was more than made up for. It was estimated by Partners in Flight that the population of global breeding was at 41 million. They had found out that 54% were living in Canada while having another 46% living in the United States. They were not on the 2012 Watch List because they rated 6 out of 20 on Continental Control Score. This chickadee can be aided in two ways: first, anybody who has bird feeders is a benefit to this species; second, clearing the forest for cultivation or growth can enlarge a forest edge which can make the habitat better. When too many dead trees are cut out of forests, as ordered by land managers, chickadees suffer because they nest in the hollows of these trees like many other birds.

Interesting Facts -

  • The Black-capped is the state bird of both Massachusetts and Maine.
  • It also has one of the most perplexing songs/vocalizations of all animals. It may be an alarm call, a contact call, signify admission of a particular flock or to recognize an individual.
  • They also hide their food taking up to 28 days to retrieve it.

Do you have feeders in your yard for these birds? It is fun to watch them!

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© 2014 The Examiner-1

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    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      Mary,

      During the winter they need food from the feeders since the temperatures are too low for their natural food to live. In the summer they are busy mating, raising and feeding their young ones. You can usually catch them in the spring (before they mate), fall (when they finish mating) and in the winter (if they have not migrated).

      I am glad that you enjoyed it and I appreciate your reading it. I also want to thank you for your vote and comments.

      Kevin

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 2 years ago from New York

      Another interesting bird hub. This bird is closer to home for me. I see them all winter long, but not in the summer. It was nice to learn a little more about them. As always, I enjoyed reading.

      Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      Good morning Rachel, :), thank you for reading about my favorite birdie. We have to do something about the squirrels. Right?. I have another Hub, or more, which talk about that.

      I am glad that you liked the video and pictures, I did my best. I also appreciate the vote and compliment.

      Have a wonderful day. :-)

      Kevin

    • Rachel L Alba profile image

      Rachel L Alba 2 years ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      How precious is that little Chickadee. I really love birds. I have bird feeders but the squirrels get to it first sometimes. Thank you for that beautiful video and the pictures. I voted up and beautiful.

      Blessings to you.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      I cannot help saying this Catherine but that is the first time which I have heard someone say that they did not think it was a real bird. I hope that you see these in your yard, they are all over. In US, UK, Europe - under different names maybe but they are there.

      Thank you very much for the compliment and the vote up.

      Have a nice night and good luck with the birds. :-)

      Kevin

    • CatherineGiordano profile image

      Catherine Giordano 2 years ago from Orlando Florida

      I've heard of chickadees, but knew nothing about them. There's a 50/50 chance I would have said they weren't a real bird, and that chickadee was just a slang term. now I know all about chickadees. Voted Up.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      There birds in the Paridae family in the UK just not these ones. These are North American area.

      Thank you reading, pinning and sharing.

      I hope that you have a nice weekend. :-)

      Kevin

    • annmackiemiller profile image

      annmackiemiller 2 years ago from Bingley Yorkshire England

      we don't see them in the Uk - would love to - pinned and shared

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      They are still around in the winter if you keep enough food out for them when they cannot find their natural food. I hear the titmice all of the time near my yard (same family) and I used to see both when I fed the birds all of the time in another house.

      I miss the birds waking me in the morning too but I hear the robin not long after I am up now so it will be soon. :-)

      Thank you for reading this. Have a nice day!

      Kevin

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 2 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Oh you made me miss our chickadees. We will see them again when we get back in Spring. We have several feeders in our cottage and attract many of them. They always wake us up in the morning - a beautiful way to wake up.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      Where do you live? There are so many in their family and they are all over - the US, the UK, Europe, Canada, even ice cold freezing Alaska. They are very friendly to humans and eat right out of their hands, I did that. Thank you for reading this and I hope that you do see at least one. Titmice are also popular, in the same family and just as abundant.

      Kevin

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 2 years ago from Home Sweet Home

      oh i have never seen a real chickadee before, your hubs with picture is great

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      mishpat,

      Hi, depending what type of sparrow it is, they can be a hassle or nice and friendly. For the Goldfinches you should put out what is called a thistle sock, or Goldfinch sock. It holds only thistle seeds which only the Goldfinches eat - and rarely the House Finches. If you put the peanuts for the squirrels then besides Jays you will probably see the Titmice, Chickadees, woodpeckers there too - and maybe the Cardinals. When you can sit outside with a cup of coffee the Titmice an Chickadees will also eat from your hand eventually.

      Another thing is leaving feeders out in the winter when food is scarce.

      You should be careful of those squirrels (and others) they can bite (with rabies, for instance), plus they crawl up your pants. I hate to ruin your laughs and smiles but you have to see the other side too and be careful.

      Have a nice weekend.

    • mishpat profile image

      mishpat 2 years ago

      I have two feeders and a suet cage. Sparrows are the main customers as they live in the bushes beneath the feeders. I really should keep a record but I don't. There is a flock of Goldfinches during the summer. Then there are two larger couples that frequent the feeders. A pair of Downy Woodpeckers and Cardinals but I haven't seen the Cardinals too much recently. There is a Tufted Tit mouse and a family of Black Caps, at least three, that are around often, as well as some dark-eyed (slate) Junkos. Another regular (my favorite since my boyhood days) is a Flicker, maybe a pair. They are so antsy I don't get a good eye measure before their gone. Blue Jays are there occasionally as well as Grackles and Cowbirds. Surprisingly, Starlings do show up but not often.

      Then there are three regular black squirrels, Beaver, Skunk and Scruffy. A grey squirrel, Tip. And two reds, Fatso and Antsy. Fatso will eat from your hand. In fact, if I am working in the garage, I have to look where I walk cuz he might show up at anytime and get under my feet.

      It's a menagerie of fun and color the makes me laugh or smile in the mornings.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 2 years ago

      I am glad that you stopped by to read this. So, what do you see at the feeder, or is it too soon to ask? I wrote about squirrels at feeders and baffles. I put a separate tray out with peanuts (in shells) for the squirrels, you may also see blue jays and a few other birds there too.

      Happy Thanksgiving!

    • mishpat profile image

      mishpat 2 years ago

      Just as funny... I have a feeder outside the kitchen window. And, yup, the squirrels were a problem, but I feed them also. Anyway ..

      I made my own baffle (reverse dog collar) and put it on the feeder post. Too low, so I moved it up. Hmm, still seeing squirrel tails sticking out of the round feeder. Then, one morning as I am watching the birds, a black squirrel jumps on the birdbath which is about 4-5 feet from the feeder. Zap, he makes the leap onto the baffle and shinnies up the post to the feeder. What to do? Move the birdbath.

      So, I'm looking out the window the next morning and here comes blackie. He jumps up on the birdbath. And then Zap, again over toward the feeder. Apparently, he didn't notice the change and goes flying into the post below the baffle and hits the deck. In a cat like fashion, he looks around a bit, shakes his whole body and preens a bit then begins eating the seeds on the ground. No more squirrels in the feeder. BTW, I do feed them also, some by hand.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      LOL That is perfect Writer Fox, you are right this is a little one. :-) As soon as I saw it, it was my favorite!

      Thank you for your compliment on the article.

      Kevin

    • Writer Fox profile image

      Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      This is a fantastic article about the Chickadee. I can't think about this bird without thinking of that old movie with W. C. Fields, 'My Little Chickadee.'

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I try to write about all of my birds (all Hubs) detailed and interesting. They are my favorite bird. I chose it when I began bird watching. I used to love listening to birds outside my window too, but they seem to have stopped doing that.

      Glad to share - thanks for reading. :-)

      Kevin

    • LadyFiddler profile image

      Joanna Chandler 3 years ago from On planet Earth

      Detailed and interesting hub about the chickadee birds, birds are very lovely and makes beautiful sounds. Every morning they wake very early and sing outside my grannies window as though they wants to wake us up.

      Thanks for sharing

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I am glad that you enjoyed it Nancy, they are both cute little birds. They are my favorites, the chickadee is first. They were the first two that I had eating from my hand when I first learned about birds. Thank you for stopping by.

      Kevin

    • OhMe profile image

      Nancy Tate Hellams 3 years ago from Pendleton, SC

      We enjoy the Carolina Chicadee and will have plenty of sunflowers for them this winter. I sure enjoyed reading and learning more about the Chicadee and Titmouse.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      They are something to watch, are they not? They are my favorite bird. Do you know what else do you have at your feeder?

      Kevin

    • Pawpawwrites profile image

      Jim 3 years ago from Kansas

      I love them. I noticed one eating some seeds from our ornamental sunflowers the other day.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I knew that hand feeding would be liked. When I first began bird watching, as soon as I read that they did it I tried it and sure enough, the chickadees and the titmice were eating from my hand! They became my two top birds. I did not know that they forgot either but most animals probably do.

      I am very glad that you thought it was interesting and I am pleased with your votes. You are welcome for the post, but there are still more coming in this family.

      Kevin

    • bethperry profile image

      Beth Perry 3 years ago from Tennesee

      Kevin, that video on hand feeding chickadees is so amazing!

      I love this breed of bird, but did not realize they so quickly forgot where the food source is.

      Very interesting Hub; voted up and thank you for posting!

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Thank you Deb. :-) I have also seen both, I saw the Black-capped in NJ and the Carolina in the south. I had the Black-capped eating out of my hand. How about you? I also remember the nuthatch from NJ.

      Kevin

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Very nicely done. I have known both the Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees, the Black-capped the friendliest of the two. The nuthatches were also common in Maine, too.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I do not fully understand that Lady Guinevere, but I am sure that you have it figured out.

      Kevin

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 3 years ago from West By God

      Thanks Kevin and I do not know why I cannot follow this hub and your comments do not show up in my news feed. I am only getting them as I come back every couple of minutes.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I had bought a large bag too but my feeder fell down, before I managed to put it back the seeds when rotten and I threw it out - in the garbage can. Even the (seed) bag was turning black.The squirrels go for the peanuts, and the 'coons and 'possums might too. I am not sure about them. Put the nuts out when you put the cat food out.

      Kevin

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 3 years ago from West By God

      If I ever get paid by Bubblews I will go buy peanuts. We used to get the big bg of seeds, but the last time that we did that it all went bad in the bottom and we had to trow it all out into the woods. It is cheaper that way, but I only get the smaller bags now, but I will feed them come November through the winter months when there is nothing for them to eat. I thought that would be cheaper on the budget, but them eating all the cat food is coming out more expensive in the long run. We also have squirrels, raccoons, and possums that are eating the cat food too. I do not feed the coons and possums right out. They eat whatever they can get after I feed to cat an evening meal. I have to sit out there with him so I know he can eat what I give him.

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      If you have flowers and trees they should keep most of the birds happy, such as the hummingbirds. Can you afford cheap peanuts (unsalted) when you shop (they usually do not cost much)? They will please the Blue Jays, woodpeckers and maybe even the chickadees and titmice. :-) Plus, when you can manage an occasional small, low-priced, bag of mixed seeds, they will be fine.

      Most bigger birds usually eat on the ground. Thank you for reading, have a nice weekend.

      Kevin

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Yes, they are about the same Mel! They do have differences and I will be writing about it soon. They may act the same but there are slight differences like the calls and song. Thank you for reading this until I write about the Mountain Chickadee.

      Kevin

    • Lady Guinevere profile image

      Debra Allen 3 years ago from West By God

      I have them, Blue Jays, Titmouse, Ruby Throated Hummingbirds, Pileated Woodpeckers, Downy Woodpeckers, Red-Headed Woodpeckers, and Cardinals in my woods. We did have feeders out there but ran out of money to fill them again this time and now they are all eating the cat food out there in the cat food bowl.

      We also have bigger birds, but they do not come to the feeders.

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Here in Southern California we don't have the Black-Capped, but up in the mountains we have the Mountain Chickadee, which looks and acts essentially the same. I love this friendly and inquisitive little bird. Great hub!

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Thank you Jo, I always try to make them as informative as possible. Identifying birds takes practice. You have a bird feeder and you have a book, when you have time make a cup of tea (or coffee) sit down and simply watch them several times.

      The Black-capped Chickadee and the Coal Tit are related - they are in the same family!

      Kevin

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Kevin, great hub! Informative as always. I don't think we get the Chickadee here in the U.K. but they do look like the Coal-tit that visits the bird feeder in the garden sometimes. I had a look at one of my husband's bird books, I love nature, but not so good at identifying birds. :)

      The Black Capped Chickadee could be related to our Coal-tit. Interesting!

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Yes, Genna, many birds need feeders in the winter since their natural food is hard to find - or cannot be found. It is good that you have feeders. I loved watching and listening to chickadees also, they are my favorite bird. :-) I am very glad that you liked the Hub.

      Kevin

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      We see these darling birds more in the winter, but we have special winter feeders. I have always loved this these little guys…they are delicate and I like to listen their calls. Very interesting hub. :-)

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
      Author

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I love them too, also I use to watch them - and finches - at my window feeder. I am glad that you enjoyed it Shyron.

      I am also glad that you liked the videos. thank you for stopping by!

      Kevin

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Kevin, I love these little black capped chickadees. They come to my feed which has the special seed mix just the little ones by my window so I can watch them.

      Love the videos also.

      Shyron

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Kim,

      That sound may be made, or may not, by the Great-tailed Grackle, they are one who steals seeds and are hardly seen because they may come out early. You can try spreading some seeds on the ground, away from the feeder, to see if any birds come to them.

      Kevin

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Thank you very much Kim, I really appreciate that. You are correct, they probably think of one call, not many. Birds have both songs and calls. That EEkeyEE sound I believe does remind me of something. Thank you for sharing and for pinning.

      I like your call, :-) , it almost reminds me of the sound of the Mourning Dove.

      Kevin - Have a nice week.

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 3 years ago from North Carolina

      Kevin,

      Such cool article. Fascinating information. I think lots of folks generally think of a bird call rather than the range of bird calls. I have a bird I have never seen, or at least I do not think so which makes a EEkeyEE sound which now I wonder if it is actually more of a CHICK-A-DEE sound. Thanks for writing an informative hub and definitely a shared/pinned.

      whistle whistle coo coo (my attempt at bird talk),

      Kim : )

    • The Examiner-1 profile image
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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Frank, thank you for sharing my Hub. I did not know about it until I saw it on HubPages, otherwise I would have mentioned it in the comment before.

      Kevin

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Hi Frank, the squirrels are probably why you do not see any birds at the feeders. If you do not have them, you need squirrel baffles. You can buy these or make them yourself. I wrote a Hub about these, "I do not see birds, but the seeds are gone". After you see the squirrels slide off of these a few times they will give up and the birds will come. Then you will become a bird watcher!

      Kevin

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      Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

      the examiner you are going to make a bird watcher out of me yet..The only thing I see at my bird feeders are squirrels .. those rodents even eat the plastic housing grrrrrrrrrrrrrr

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      It was my pleasure Nell, I am glad that you liked it. By the way, you may have not seen this particular one but you have chickadees over there. The chickadees (and titmice) from here are called tits there.

      Kevin

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      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      I have never seen one, I live in England so we don't get them here, but I love the fact that the name is the sound of their call, what an interesting hub, I learned something new! thanks!

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Thank you very much Theresa. I think of it as a sweet little bird too, and it is my #1! Down here in the south is the Carolina Chickadee, which will be my next bird Hub. I am glad that you enjoyed it. :-)

      Thank you for your votes and shares.

      I hope that you have a nice coming week too.

      Kevin

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      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Great hub, Kevin. What a sweet little bird. I have not seen one here. I live in the deep South. Their song is interesting. I loved learning all about the Black-capped Chickadee. I love birds and my mother loved birds and I learned much from her.

      Voted up ++++ tweeting and pinning

      Hope your week ahead is wonderful.

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      If you mean the one who is not wearing the glove, that is a Black-capped Chickadee. I am happy for you to watch one. I am glad that you enjoyed it I thank you for sharing it on twitter.

      Kevin

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      What we call titmice and chickadees here (US, Canada mainly) are your tits over there, and they are also in the same family. Thank you for liking the Hub.

      Kevin

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I am surprised that I have not remembered that cartoon all of the years that I have admired this bird until you mentioned it. I really appreciate what you have said about my Hub Jan and I thank you for your vote.

      Kevin

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I take that means they are in your yard all of the time. Congratulations William! I thank you for stopping by and admiring the Hub. :-)

      Kevin

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      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I believe i see a type of chickadee at my bird feeder. It is tiny and looks exactly like the bird that is eating out of the man's hand. ( loved the video. ) Thank's again for info. about the chickadees. Shared on twitter...

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      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      This is full of great information and the photos are amazing. I've never heard of chickadees or titmice but they look just like the birds we call long-tailed tits, blacktits and bluetits (going down in size), though even the long-tailed tits are not as big as 4-5".

      They are all lovely; we watch our local ones in the back garden, along with the goldfinches in the summer, along the canal.

      Great hub!

      Ann

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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Nicely researched, well-presented article, Kevin. I only remember hearing about the chickadee in the cartoon with the big rooster who says something to the effect of, "Come hear my little chickadee." Lol :) Very informative hub, voted up and interesting.

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      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Love to have the birds come by. Neat hub. Thanks for sharing! ;-)

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      When I was in NJ, Torrs, I had many birds on my feeders but I chose the chickadee as my favorite, and the titmouse as my second. I did not know until later that they were the same family. Boy are they cute! That is why I have it as my photo, I just adore it! It really makes my day to know that I was able to make your day better. :-)

      Have a nice weekend!

      Kevin

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Down here in the south it is the Carolina Chickadee which is mainly in the area. If you want to see them, just put out a small dish of black oil sunflower seeds and/or a small one of water on a porch/deck table. I had a feeder that fell down and I had a pie dish (upside-down) on the string to deter squirrels. The string wore out and broke so I set them on a chair. The pie plate catches rain (right-side up) and small birds take baths in it! (Chickadees, wrens, etc.)

      I am happy that you also liked the article and I am grateful for more votes and shares.

      Have a nice weekend too.

      Kevin

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      Tori Canonge 3 years ago from California

      I used to look out my grandparents' window and watch the chickadees land on the bird feeder. They are such cute little things! Thanks for bringing back some memories for me :-)

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      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      I used to see the Black-capped when I was in NJ and when I moved down south I quickly learned of the Carolina. I am glad that you liked the article and I thank you for sharing it.

      Have a nice weekend!

      Kevin

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      Suzette Walker 3 years ago from Taos, NM

      I have never seen a chickadee in the wild or outside my windows. Thanks for such an interesting and informative hub about them. They are beautiful and I had no idea about how many calls they had. I think I would love to have them outside the window and listen to their calls. I agree, great article and voted up+ and shared.

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      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I have seen the Carolina one; being where I live. In fact I have a pair that come outside a window at a feeder in winter. I don't see it in summer though. Great article. Up and shared.