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Chimera, Hydra, Cerberus, Orthrus - Greek Mythological Creatures

Updated on June 8, 2016

Cerberus Dog

Cerberus Dog
Cerberus Dog

Cerberus – Hound of Hades

In Greek mythology story, the great titan known as Typhon and Echidna (his mate) had many famous monstrous offspring:

The serpent-tailed and three-headed dog Cerberus (sometimes spelled as Cerberos/ Kerberos) was the offspring of Typhon and Echidna (In Greek mythology, parents didn't necessarily resemble their offspring). In some sources on Greek mythological figures, Cerberus had not 3, but 50 heads. Cerberus was a strong, pitiless, flesh-eating, fierce underworld watchdog, stationed by the river Styx, from which post it would keep the living from entering the land of the dead. The dog is also known as Hell Hound or Hound of Hades. Like the Gorgons, Cerberus was so scary and dreadful to behold that those who looked upon him was turned to stone. Even the gods feared Cerberus but Hercules had to kidnap Cerberus and bring the three headed dog to King Eurystheus.

Chimera Creature

Chimera Creature
Chimera Creature

Chimera Monster

The Chimera (or Chimaera/ Khimaira) was a monstrous beast which ravaged the countryside of Lycia in Anatolia. Chimera was female and the youngest daughter of Typhon and Echidna. It was a composite creature with the maned head and body of a lion, a serpentine tail at the back and a goat’s head rising in the middle. The King Iobates sent the brave warrior Bellerophon to kill the beast with the help of Pegasus horse before Chimera keep doing further damage. Driving a lead-tipped lance down the Chimera’s flaming throat, Bellerophon had successfully made the monster get suffocated and died.

Hydra Monster

Hydra Monster
Hydra Monster

Multi Headed Hydra

Another multi-headed monster, Hydra, was also one of the offspring of Echinda and Typhon. The hydra has 9 heads and the number of its head varies from different versions of the legend but it is depicted as having 9 heads in many stories. If the heads are cut off, they would grow back. When one head was chopped off, it would result two heads growing in its place. The middle head of the creature was said to be immortal and has a very poisonous venom and breath.

Hydra was said to have lived in the Lernean marsh (located near Argolis, Greece). If her brother Cerberus guarded the above ground entrance, she guarded the underwater entrance to the underworld. Hydra was killed by Heracles in his second labor. To prevent more heads growing from where it was severed, the Heracles’ companion lolaus and his nephew would use firebrand to cauterise the neck stump. The immortal head was then buried by Heracles under a large boulder.

Orthrus

Orthrus
Orthrus

Two Headed Orthrus

In Greek mythology, Orthus (Orthos) or Orthrus (Orthros) was a two-headed dog, almost as vicious as Cerberus, his brother. According to some versions, the Drakon Chimaera (his own sister) was in love with him and spawned the Nemean Lion and the deadly Sphinx together.

The giant Geryon used him to guard his fabulous herds of cattle. Geryon was the king of Erytheia in Spain and the owner of large herds of white cattle. Heracles eventually slew Orthus, Geryon and Eurytion before taking the red cattle to complete his 10th labor.

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      ScarletPhoenix1 4 years ago

      I loved the Hydra! Its one of my favorites so far!

    • profile image

      ...the guy 6 years ago

      Awesome!!!!!! I love ancient greek history and i know all of those creatures but i actually learnt something new every time i read about a different creature! :)

    • profile image

      Avagantamos 6 years ago

      i like puppies!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • CMHypno profile image

      CMHypno 7 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

      Interesting hub on Greek mythological creatures - they sure did give birth to some interesting children back then!

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