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Chinese History | National Treasures

Updated on February 28, 2014

National Treasures Showing Chinese History

Between 1st April and 2nd June, 2009 the National Museum of China loaned to Hainan Provincial Museum of Haikou, 66 artefacts designated as "National Treasures".

This museum was completed in 2008 and has only recently been opened to the public. As a means of attracting visitors to this new facility, the exhibition was extremely successful, with a steady flow of visitors filing through it.

The "National Treasures" included items made from bronze, jade, pottery, terracotta, gold and other precious metals. These artefacts demonstrate symbols of the power of past rulers as well as the superb craftsmanship of the artisans of their time... some from thousands of years ago.

Image: drs2biz | Lens Updated: March 1st, 2014 @ 3:15 am Beijing time.

A Point On Image Quality...

The nature of exhibitions of rare and delicate Chinese artefacts necessitates that flash photography is not allowed. As a result, the following images are of varying quality, according to the available ambient light ~ drs2biz!

China's National Treasures Exhibition Sign

Human Face & Fish Pattern Painted Pottery (Ren Min Yu Wen Cai Tao Pen)
Human Face & Fish Pattern Painted Pottery (Ren Min Yu Wen Cai Tao Pen)

Human Face & Fish Pattern Painted Pottery

(Ren Min Yu Wen Cai Tao Pen)

TIME: The Neolithic Age (7000-5000 BCE)

PURPOSE: This is the cover of a child's pottery coffin. In Yangshao culture, there was a custom to put the remains of dead children in pottery urns.


The human face and fish pattern painted pottery was used as a cover for the urn. After depositing the dead child's remains, the urn and cover would be interred in a place near the family house.

Small Mouth Clay Bottle With Pointed Bottom (Xiao Kou Jian Di Pin)
Small Mouth Clay Bottle With Pointed Bottom (Xiao Kou Jian Di Pin)

Small Mouth Clay Bottle With Pointed Bottom

(Xiao Kou Jian Di Pin)

TIME: The Neolithic Age (7000-5000 BCE)

PURPOSE: A kind of reservoir used in a water-pumping system.

Running Spiral Design Coloured Pottery (Wo Wen Cai Cao Guan)
Running Spiral Design Coloured Pottery (Wo Wen Cai Cao Guan)

Running Spiral Design Coloured Pottery

(Wo Wen Cai Cao Guan)

TIME: New Stone Age (5000 BCE)

PURPOSE: Carrying water

New Stone Age White Pottery Vessel (Bai Tao Gui)
New Stone Age White Pottery Vessel (Bai Tao Gui)

New Stone Age White Pottery Vessel

(Bai Tao Gui)

TIME: New Stone Age (6300-4500 BCE)

PURPOSE: Drinking vessel

New Stone Age Jade Prayer Stick (Yu Cong)
New Stone Age Jade Prayer Stick (Yu Cong)

New Stone Age Jade Prayer Stick

(Yu Cong)

TIME: New Stone Age (6,300-4,500 BCE)

PURPOSE: Used in religious ceremonies to facilitate prayer.

NOTES: About 100 of these items were found in Jiangsu, Zhejiang, & Shanghai. Many scholars believe they were used as musical instruments. It stands 49.7 cm high and is 6.4 cm tapering to 5.6 cm wide.


Used in the Liang Zhu civilization. The colour is dark green, and it is composed of 9 sections, each section having 4 corners, with primitive engravings of the faces of animals and people on them. Each item has 76 of these engravings, and each one represents a god.

The exterior surface is square shaped, representing the earth, and it has a hollow circular interior, representing the sky. The lines engraved on the surface represent the rays of the sun and the moon.

New Stone Age Jade Pig Dragon (Yu Zhu Long)
New Stone Age Jade Pig Dragon (Yu Zhu Long)

New Stone Age Jade Pig Dragon

(Yu Zhu Long)

TIME: The New Stone Age (6,000 to 5,000 BCE)

PURPOSE: Sacrificial ceremonial purposes; found on the chest cavity of a cadaver. Its dimensions are 7.2 cm H X 5.2 cm wide; white C-shaped item with yellow flecks.


This item was found in the 1980s. It has a lifelike pig's head and a dragon's tail. The mouth is slightly open and it has a prominent snout and big eyes. The pig represented strength and wealth in ancient society.

Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Turtle Back
Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Turtle Back

Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Turtle-back

(Zhifa Qi Lai)

IMAGE: Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Turtle-back!

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600-1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: Used for auspicating (to begin or inaugurate with a ceremony intended to bring good luck) as in the Ceremonial Ox Bone, below.


Notes: During the Shang Dynasty, people usually used the Turtle-back to auspicate. The pictographs carved into the Turtle-back are thought by archaeologists to be the earliest used Chinese characters.

Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Ox Bone
Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Ox Bone

Shang Dynasty Ceremonial Ox Bone

(Wu Niu Bu Gu Ke Ci)

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: Auspicating (to begin or inaugurate with a ceremony intended to bring good luck).


Notes: People who lived in the Shang Dynasty usually sacrificed horses, oxen, goats, dogs and pigs when they auspicated. They even practised human sacrifice. The number of animals or people they sacrificed varied from one to several hundred! This ox bone has pictographs carved into it, showing that they should sacrifice five oxen.

Shang Dynasty Dragon-Tiger Bronze
Shang Dynasty Dragon-Tiger Bronze

Dragon-tiger Bronze Zun - Shang Dynasty

(Long Hu Wen Tong Zun)

IMAGE: Dragon-tiger Bronze Cameo Ware!

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

NOTES: In ancient China, the Zun was used as a wine container.


It has three dragons and three androphagous (cannibalistic) tigers on its body. Some experts say, the pattern on it is like three Taotie (a kind of legendary beast that loved eating human beings in ancient China) eating people. This bronze Zun is very rare and priceless.

Shang Dynasty Ruding Pattern Bronze Vessel
Shang Dynasty Ruding Pattern Bronze Vessel

Shang Dynasty Ruding Pattern Bronze Vessel

(Ruding Wen Tong Fang Ding)

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: an unusual three-legged or four-legged ancient Chinese cooking vessel.

Fuhao's Bronze Square Drinking Cup
Fuhao's Bronze Square Drinking Cup

Fuhao's Bronze Square Drinking Cup

(Fuhao Tong Fang Jia)

IMAGE: Fuhao's Bronze Square Drinking Cup!

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

NOTES: The Jia was a kind of bronze vessel that belonged to Fuhao. This Jia was not only used for drinking, it also could use for heating wine. During the Shang Dynasty, a Jia was only for use by royalty.

Shang Dynasty - Fuhao's Bronze Owl Wine Vessel (Fuhao Tong Xiao Zun)
Shang Dynasty - Fuhao's Bronze Owl Wine Vessel (Fuhao Tong Xiao Zun)

Fuhao's Bronze Owl Wine Vessel

(Fuhao Tong Xiao Zun)

IMAGE: Fuhao's Bronze Owl Wine Vessel

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: A type of wine vessel used in this period. It is shaped like an owl, which was treated as a holy bird during that time. It belonged to a woman called Fuhao, the wife of an emperor of the Shang dynasty.


This is a masterpiece of the art of Chinese bronze during the late Shang Dynasty, and is one of the Top Ten National Treasures!

Fuhao's Bronze Square Vessel
Fuhao's Bronze Square Vessel

Fuhao's Bronze Square Vessel

(Fuhao Tong Ou Fang Yi)

IMAGE: Fuhao's Bronze Square Vessel

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

NOTES: Special wine container that belonged to a woman named Fuhao.


Fuhao was a great woman who was King Wuding's wife in the Shang Dynasty. She also was a great politician and militarist during her time.

Jade Man With Wide Weapon
Jade Man With Wide Weapon

Jade Man With Wide Weapon

(Yao Pei Kuan Bing Qi Yu Ren)

IMAGE: Jade Man With Wide Weapon

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: Jade artwork used for ornamental purposes.


This artwork is made of the highly prized Hetian Jade, mined from the Kunlun Mountains in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of North-Western China. It is said that the jade man was a nobleman in the Shang Dynasty.

Shang Dynasty Gray Jade Bowl
Shang Dynasty Gray Jade Bowl

Shang Dynasty Gray Jade Bowl!

(Qing Yu Gui)

IMAGE: Shang Dynasty Gray Jade Bowl

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: Bowl used for processing grains.


The bowl was filled with rice, broomcorn millet and grain sorghum during the Shang Dynasty.

Shang Dynasty Tiger_Patterned Slate
Shang Dynasty Tiger_Patterned Slate

Shang Dynasty Tiger-patterned Slate

(Hu Wen Shi Qing)

IMAGE: Shang Dynasty Tiger-patterned slate

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: One of a series of musical stones, struck with an iron rod to create a euphonious sound.


NOTES: The Qing is a kind of Chinese ancient musical instrument. This slate is a component part of the Qing. This instrument was used when holding religious ceremonies, and was only used by royalty.

Shang Dynasty Zuoceban's Bronze Turtle (Zuoceban Tong Yuan)
Shang Dynasty Zuoceban's Bronze Turtle (Zuoceban Tong Yuan)

Zuoceban's Bronze Turtle

(Zuoceban Tong Yuan)

IMAGE: Zuoceban's Bronze Turtle!

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: This rare bronze ware was made during the late Shang Dynasty.


In ancient China, the yuan was a kind of huge turtle which was very strong. One day, the Shang Emperor came to the banks of the Huan river and found a turtle. He shot four arrows into it, and not one missed. The Emperor gave it to Zuoceban, the official historian of Shang at the time, and commanded him to make a bronze image to honour this event. This bronze turtle is the result.

Shang Dynasty Beast-faced Bronze Phosphoriser  (Shou Mian Wen Tong Nao)!
Shang Dynasty Beast-faced Bronze Phosphoriser (Shou Mian Wen Tong Nao)!

Shang, Beast-faced Bronze Phosphoriser

(Shou Mian Wen Tong Nao)

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600~1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: A percussion instrument in ancient China. It was popular during the late Shang and Zhou dynasties. Compared with a bronze bell, it didn't have a clapper but was much larger.


In those times, a drum was usually used for conducting an army forwards, but a bronze phosphoriser was used for telling the army to stop.

Shang Dynasty Bronze Zun - Square Wine Vessel
Shang Dynasty Bronze Zun - Square Wine Vessel

Bronze Zun - Square Wine Vessel

A fine example of early bronze craftsmanship

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600 - 1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: Used as a wine vessel, for storage and ceremonial applications. It is 58.6 cm in height and is decorated with 4x sheep heads.


The zun was uncovered in Hunan Province in 1938 at "Ning Xiang Yue Shan Pu" (village) which is now known as "Huang Cai Zhen Long Quan" (Dragon Bridge village).

Shang Dynasty Flanged Bronzed Mask With Protruding Pupils
Shang Dynasty Flanged Bronzed Mask With Protruding Pupils

Flanged Bronzed Mask with Protruding Pupils

Excavated From Sanxingdui ("Three Stars Mound") in Sichuan

IMAGE: Extrusive-eyed Bronze Mask "Heaven's Favourite Son"

TIME: Shang Dynasty (1600-1046 BCE)

PURPOSE: This mask was made in memory of a king of the Shu state called Cancong. Cancong had a pair of extrusive eyes. Experts guess maybe Cancong had struma disease, or he wouldn't have had such eyes.


Excavated in 1986 from the Sanxingdui archaeological site, located about 40 kilometres north-east of Chengdu in Sichuan Province, 10 kilometres east of the city of Guanghan. This mask, 82.5 cm in height and 78 cm in width, is U-shaped in cross-section. The pupils and ears were pre-cast. The dragon-shaped flange, measuring 68.1 cm in height, was cast onto the centre of the forehead.

At the time of excavation, the eyes and eyebrows still retained a black pigment while the lips were painted red. Mysterious and gorgeous, this mask is one of the most impressive Sanxingdui images. The protruding pupils and flange rising above the mask are striking. The eyes of the mask are related to the legend of Cancong, the progenitor of the ancient Shu people.

Alternatively, it is proposed that the eyes are the "straight eyes" associated with the God Zhulong. Yet another theory argues that the legends describe a vertical eye in the middle of the forehead. The evidence of the excavation shows this artefact is probably from the late Shang (16th - 11th century BC) Period.

Western Zhou Dynasty Bronze Quadrate Vessel
Western Zhou Dynasty Bronze Quadrate Vessel

Western Zhou Bronze Quadrate Vessel

( Li Fang Yi)

IMAGE: Western Zhou Dynasty Bronze Quadrate Vessel

TIME: Western Zhou Dynasty (1046~771 BCE)

NOTES: This is a kind of vessel used for holding wine.


This was used as a wine container, but the ancient Chinese also carved inscriptions on its inside to record important events. A bronze vessel from the Western Zhou period.

Ji Zibai's Guo State Bronze Tray - Western Zhou Dynasty
Ji Zibai's Guo State Bronze Tray - Western Zhou Dynasty

Ji Zibai's Guo State Bronze Tray

(Guo Ji Zi Bai Pan)

IMAGE: Ji Zibai's Guo State Bronze Tray

TIME: Western Zhou Dynasty (816 BCE)

NOTES: This is a kind of vessel used for holding water.


Ji Zibai was a soldier of the Guo state during the Zhou Dynasty. The King of the Guo state rewarded Ji Zibai for his battle achievements, so Ji Zibai had this tray made in commemoration. There is epigraph on the bottom of the tray, and it's a very famous and precious bronze vessel from the Western Zhou period.

Wang Ziwu's Tripod (Wang Ziwu Ding) from Spring and Autumn Period
Wang Ziwu's Tripod (Wang Ziwu Ding) from Spring and Autumn Period

Wang Ziwu Tripod

(Wang Ziwu Ding)

IMAGE: Wang Ziwu Tripod

TIME: Spring and Autumn Period (770~476 BCE)

PURPOSE: A mortuary object belonging to nobleman, Wang Ziwu, the son of an emperor in the Chu State.


This artefact was found in the Xi county of Henan province. In 1977, a boy stumbled over a hard object in the dried-up Danjiangkou reservoir when he was grazing cattle. That was the Wang Ziwu tripod. There were seven tripods found there that day, but this one was the biggest and most famous one.

In ancient China, a vessel with two loop handles and three or four legs was called a ding, and was used for cooking meat soup. There was a code of etiquette in the Zhou dynasty, which stipulated that the king could use nine tripods when he had meals, a vassal could use seven and a minister could use five. The number of tripods that they could used indicated their social class. So, according to the number of tripods excavated, archaeologists believe that Wang Ziwu was a vassal.

On the base of the tripod there is an inscription that narrates Wang Ziwu's political achievements and his family precepts. The inscription was written in a kind of letter-form that was China's earliest artistic calligraphy.

Emperor Fuchai's Bronze Ice Container (Wu Wang Fuchai Jian)
Emperor Fuchai's Bronze Ice Container (Wu Wang Fuchai Jian)

Emperor Fuchai's Bronze Ice Container

(Wu Wang Fuchai Jian)

IMAGE: Ice basin belonging to Wu Emperor, Fuchai

TIME: Spring and Autumn Period (770~476 BCE)

PURPOSE: This large basin belonged to Fuchai, a famous emperor of the Wu state.


The basin was used for storing ice to freeze food in the Spring and Autumn Period.

Bird-Shaped Copper Tripod (Niao Xing Tong Ding) Spring and Autumn Period
Bird-Shaped Copper Tripod (Niao Xing Tong Ding) Spring and Autumn Period

Bird-Shaped Copper Tripod

(Niao Xing Tong Ding)

IMAGE: Bird-Shaped Copper Tripod

TIME: Spring and Autumn Period (770~476 BCE)

PURPOSE: A cooking vessel (Ding) used to cook or hold meat in ancient China.


This tripod was found to be buried in the manor of the ancient Yan states, from the Spring & Autumn Period.

Big Copper Crock (Da Tong Fou) Warring States Period
Big Copper Crock (Da Tong Fou) Warring States Period

Big Copper Crock

(Da Tong Fou)

IMAGE: Big Copper Crock

TIME: Warring States Period (475~221BCE)

PURPOSE: Holding water or wine. This huge copper crock-pot shows the exquisite level of skills in metals manufacturing that had been developed in China up to the Warring States Period. Follow the links to view the finer details.

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The Fou was a kind of a crock, with a narrow opening, used to hold water or wine in ancient China, usually made of copper or clay. But later, the Fou was used to play music on big ceremonial occasions, usually with another music instrument called a Yun.

Man-shaped Copper Oil Lantern (Ren Xing Tong Deng)
Man-shaped Copper Oil Lantern (Ren Xing Tong Deng)

Man-Shaped Copper Oil Lantern

(Ren Xing Tong Deng)

IMAGE: Man-Shaped Copper Oil Lantern!

TIME: Warring States Period (475~221BCE)

PURPOSE: Oil lantern, used during the Warring States Period.


The plates were used for holding oil and were dismountable. The copper scoop in front of it was for adding oil into the plates. This artefact is one of China's national first-level cultural relics.

Stone Chimes ~ Warring States Period
Stone Chimes ~ Warring States Period

Stone Chimes From Warring States Period

(Bian Qing)

TIME: Warring States Period (475~221 BCE)

PURPOSE: A kind of percussion instrument used in ancient China. This specimen originates from the Lu state. It's said that Confucius was good at making stone chimes.


Ancient Chinese people made jade or stones into a special shape then hung them on a wooden stand, that made up a set of Stone Chimes. They were played with a small wooden mallet. They were usually performed with the bronze chimes.

Bronze Chimes ~ Warring States Period
Bronze Chimes ~ Warring States Period

Bronze Chimes From Warring States Period

(Bian Zhong)

TIME: Warring States Period (475~221 BCE)

PURPOSE: A kind of percussion instrument used in ancient China. Earlier, in the Shang Dynasty, ancient Chinese knew how to make these Chimes.

<

Chimes were made of bronze, the bells hanging on it were arranged in sized order. They were played with small sticks or T-shaped mallets. They were usually performed with the Stone Chimes.

Qin Dynasty Terracotta Warrior From Xi'an - Visiting Hainan From Shanxi Province

The Terracotta Army - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia...

The Terra Cotta Army ("soldier and horse funerary statues") are the Terra Cotta Warriors and Horses of Qin Shi Huangdi the First Emperor of China. The terracotta figures, dating from 210 BCE, were discovered in 1974 by some local farmers near Xi'an, Shanxi province, China near the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor. The figures vary in height (183 -195 cm -- 6ft-6ft 5in), according to their role, the tallest being the generals. The figures include warriors, chariots, horses, officials, acrobats, strongmen, and musicians. Current estimates are that in the three pits containing the Terra Cotta Army there were over 8,000 soldiers, 130 chariots with 520 horses and 150 cavalry horses, the majority of which are still buried in the pits.

More from Wikipedia...

Read more about them on this Squidoo Lens Ancient China: A Homeschool Unit Study, or this other Lens about Terracotta Warriors - The Ancient Chinese Terracotta Army! Also check out this great information from a lens about the First Emperor of China!

Western Han Dynasty Bronze Rhinoceros
Western Han Dynasty Bronze Rhinoceros

Western Han Dynasty Bronze Rhinoceros

(Cuo Jin Yun Wen Tong Xi Zun)

TIME: Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE~25 CE)

PURPOSE: This is a kind of wine container, used in grand ceremonies. It was like a real rhinoceros, not only in appearance but made to scale.


Thousands of years ago, there were herds of rhinoceroses located in China. Many states used their skin to make armour for war. In that period, many kings equipped their armies with this armour. As a result, the rhinoceros became extinct in ancient China.

Jade Burial Suit From Western Han Dynasty - Crafted During the Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE to 24 CE)

Jade Burial Suit - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia...

A Jade burial suit is a ceremonial suit made of pieces of jade in which some nobles in Han Dynasty China were buried. The Chinese believed that jade had magical properties and would prevent the decay of the body.

Structure of a Jade Burial Suit.

Of the jade suits that have been found, the pieces of jade are mostly square or rectangular in shape, though triangular, trapezoid and rhomboid plaques have also been found. Plaques are often joined by means of wire, threaded through small holes drilled near the corners of each piece. The composition of the wire varies, and several suits have been found joined with either gold or silver. Other suits, such as that of the King of Nanyue, were joined using silk thread, or silk ribbon that overlapped the edges of the plaques. In some instances, additional pieces of jade have been found beneath the head covering, including shaped plaques to cover the eyes, and plugs to fit the ears and nose.

According to the Book of Later Han, the type of wire used was dependent on the station of the person buried. The jade burial suits of emperors used gold thread; princes, princesses, dukes, and marquises, silver thread; sons or daughters of those given silver thread, copper thread; and lesser aristocrats, silk thread, with all others being forbidden to be buried in jade burial suits. Examination of the known suits, such as the two found in Mancheng, has revealed that these rules were not always followed. Considering the vast size of the country, and the relatively slow means of disseminating information, it is not surprising that the materials and techniques use in a jade burial suit occasionally differed from the official guidelines.

A jade burial suit was extremely expensive to create, and only wealthy aristocrats could afford to be buried in them. Additionally, the process of manufacturing a suit was labour intensive and is estimated to have required several years to complete a single suit.

... more from Wikipedia.

Eastern Han Dynasty Model Chinese Boat
Eastern Han Dynasty Model Chinese Boat

Eastern Han Dynasty Model Chinese Boat

(Tao Chun Mo Xing)

TIME: Eastern Han Dynasty (25 - 220 CE)

PURPOSE: This model was used for display purposes.


The model has intricate detail, and was discovered in Guangdong Province in 1955. It is 54 cm in length and 15 cm in height.

Western Jin Dynasty Celadon Ware Cavalrymen (Qing Ci Qi Yong)
Western Jin Dynasty Celadon Ware Cavalrymen (Qing Ci Qi Yong)

Celadon Ware Cavalrymen

(Qing Ci Qi Yong)

IMAGE: Celadon Ware Cavalrymen

TIME: Western Jin Dynasty (265~317CE)

NOTES: Funerary objects for the wealthy elite during this period.


These artefacts have dimensions as follows: LHS length 24.0 cm and height of 23.5 cm | RHS length 37.4 cm and height of 37.5 cm.

Lotiform Celadon Ware Kettle (Qing Ci Lian Hua Zun)
Lotiform Celadon Ware Kettle (Qing Ci Lian Hua Zun)

Lotiform Celadon Ware Zun

(Qing Ci Lian Hua Zun)

IMAGE: Lotiform Celadon Ware

TIME: Northern Dynasties (420~589CE)

PURPOSE: The Zun Was a kind of drinking vessel in ancient China, but this one was made for burial with the dead. Buddhism prevailed in the Northern Dynasties and celadon ware objects were often made into lotus shapes.

This large zun was the magnum opus of celadon ware in the early Northern Dynasties. It has a height of 61.5 cm and width of 16.4 cm.

Gilded Silver Plate with Lion Pattern (Shi Wen Liu Jin Yin Pan )
Gilded Silver Plate with Lion Pattern (Shi Wen Liu Jin Yin Pan )

Gilded Silver Plate with Lion Pattern

(Shi Wen Liu Jin Yin Pan )

IMAGE: Gilded Silver Plate with Lion Pattern

TIME: Tang Dynasty (June 18, 618 - June 4, 907 CE)

NOTES: Used for decoration in the home of a wealthy individual. This ornamental plate has a diameter 40.0 cm and height of 6.7 cm.

Man Taming Horse - Tang Dynasty Figurines
Man Taming Horse - Tang Dynasty Figurines

Man Taming Horse - Tang Dynasty Figurines

Exquisite Detail in These Fine Porcelain Pieces

IMAGE: Man Taming Horse - Tang Dynasty Figurines

TIME: Tang Dynasty (June 18, 618 - June 4, 907 CE)

NOTES: Many historians regard this period as a cultural high point in China's civilisation.


The craftsmanship in these items is evidence of the care that was taken by the artisans of the time. The figurine of the man stands 36.8 cm in height and the horse is 40 cm in height.

Did you enjoy reading about China's National Treasures? Leave your comments and questions below. Please take the time to rate this lens a "thumbs up" at the top LH corner of the page. If you enjoyed it, you may care to mark it as a favourite as well.

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China's National Treasures Message Board - Questions & Comments On China's National Treasures...

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    • TriciaLymeMom profile image

      TriciaLymeMom 5 years ago

      Wonderful lens...I think I'll have to read more about Chinese history :)

    • profile image

      kulla 5 years ago

      Highly interesting lens with beautiful pics.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I was here last year and am returning with a little angel dust for wonderful presentation. I do notice some of your images are missing and hopefully will return when you refresh.

    • ArthurF LM profile image

      ArthurF LM 5 years ago

      Great lens, I really enjoyed reading about all these artifacts.

    • Deadicated LM profile image

      Deadicated LM 5 years ago

      Love your writings on Chinese History and Art, you write some really great Lenses.

    • jacinto888 profile image

      jacinto888 5 years ago

      "High-Five" I love the layout of the lens and the great content!

    • profile image

      loiuseanne 5 years ago

      "High-five" I learned a lot about China!

    • profile image

      loiuseanne 5 years ago

      "High-five" I learned a lot about China!

    • CraftaholicVete profile image

      CraftaholicVete 5 years ago

      High Five! Absolutely beautiful, the Artistry is amazing! I am so glad I chose to view this lens. Thank You.

    • CarreiraS profile image

      CarreiraS 5 years ago

      *High-five* I loved your lens

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I give you a High Five on your lens.

    • profile image

      inspirationz 5 years ago

      Great lens! great insight into China's national treasures aside from their fabulous Chinese music ;)

    • profile image

      Edutopia 5 years ago

      Fascinating lens covering a fascinating collection of artifacts. Only wish I could have seen them in person.

    • lyttlehalfpint profile image

      lyttlehalfpint 5 years ago from Canada

      I am so glad I found this lens, I don't get to travel to China often so this is like a treat to history, clearly and beautifully presented. And I definitely have a huge thank you to Sunny, for taking the time to translate this all. I mostly enjoyed the bronze turtle. Based on the pig snout, coming from huan river, it may have been a rafetus swinhoei (rare today). Liked, Pinned and Shared.

    • BSieracki profile image

      Bernie 5 years ago from Corbin, KY

      great stuff

    • Rankography profile image

      Rankography 6 years ago

      very cool lens. nice job.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      What wonderful treasures, thank you for sharing them in this private showing.....

    • dwnovacek profile image

      dwnovacek 6 years ago

      Wonderful lens - beautifully presented. Angel Blessed!

    • sushilkin lm profile image

      sushilkin lm 6 years ago

      Nice work on lens. Thanks for sharing your valuable knowledge with all. PRAY FOR JAPAN

    • drs2biz lm profile image
      Author

      David Schroeter 6 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      @jlshernandez: Thanks 'bakerwoman'. You've put a smile on my dial. :)

    • jlshernandez profile image

      jlshernandez 6 years ago

      This is like a visit to a museum. Totally enjoyable. Favorited and blessed.

    • stephenteacher profile image

      Stephen Carr 6 years ago from Corona, CA

      Had a good time reading and looking at your lens. Nice job.

    • lasertek lm profile image

      lasertek lm 6 years ago

      I enjoyed learning form this lens. Thanks for sharing.

    • Michey LM profile image

      Michey LM 7 years ago

      This lens is a museum, so I love it. you also have a special presentation&gt;

      Regards

      and thanks

      Michey

    • drs2biz lm profile image
      Author

      David Schroeter 7 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      @RebeccaE: Thank you, Rebecca. You put a smile on my dial!

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 7 years ago from Vermont

      Absolutely exquisite artworks - I am always amazed and entranced by the beauty and skill of ancient artisans. What a wonderful opportunity to see China's National Treasures - thank you so much for sharing and for linking to the larger photographs. My husband and I both enjoyed this art tour very much.

    • profile image

      RebeccaE 7 years ago

      this is wonderful, absolutely wonderful I admit China wasn't on my list of learning about until you wronte this wonderful lens, and proved that its history is something I am going to be looking into.

    • drs2biz lm profile image
      Author

      David Schroeter 7 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      @Lee Hansen: Thank you, Pastiche, I'm glad you both enjoyed this lens.

    • drs2biz lm profile image
      Author

      David Schroeter 8 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      [in reply to Sunny] You are welcome, Sunny. Without your help, this page would not have any useful information about the images I have captured from this exhibition!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      So kind of you to put my photo on your page and write an introduction for me! It's a pleasure to help you show these Chinese national treasures to foreign friends. Actually my English still needs to be improved, but I wish to be a real outstanding translator one day. Thank you for introducing me to everyone again, David!

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      anonymous 8 years ago

      Happy to see my translation is useful! I hope they can atrract more people.

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      Andy 8 years ago from London, England

      P.S. I've lensrolled this to my Exploring China lens too (and thanks very much for lensrolling mine too)

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      Andy 8 years ago from London, England

      Excellent lens and some very interesting artifacts.

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      David Schroeter 8 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      [in reply to lakeerieartists] Tks Paula. I take this as great encouragement as you have rated so many lenses, I see in your profile ;-)

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      Paula Atwell 8 years ago from Cleveland, OH

      Very interesting lens.

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      David Schroeter 8 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      [in reply to debnet] Tks Debbie. It's a great time to travel right now, with the global financial crisis (we don't call it a depression any more... why?) allowing huge discounts on hotels and airfare. You can stay in a good hotel for 10 GBP per night, for example. The exchange rate (100.00 CNY=9.71998 GBP) makes it a really great bargain.

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      Debbie 8 years ago from England

      very interesting. China is one place I would like to visit. 5 *****

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      David Schroeter 8 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      [in reply to jaye3000] Tks Jaime. I have not been to Xi'an yet, so will wait until then before I venture another lens on the warriors. The image of the one above was captured at the Haikou Museum, Hainan Province. It was on loan from Xi'an. Imagine how much care would have been needed to transport this figure - they would be extremely concerned about breakage!

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      jaye3000 8 years ago

      Very cool...you should do a lens about the Terracotta Army-very interesting. 5 stars and a fav :)

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      David Schroeter 8 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      [in reply to Jimmie] Tks Jimmie... it's always great to hear from you!

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      Jimmie Lanley 8 years ago from Memphis, TN, USA

      I hereby bless this lens.

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      Jimmie Lanley 8 years ago from Memphis, TN, USA

      One thing China does not lack is history! I love its museums. This lens is like a walk through an exhibit. Wonderful. Be sure to add it to the Learning About China group. And thanks for the link to my Ancient China lens!