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Commonly Overused Words and Phrases

Updated on September 12, 2014

Cliches Done to Death

Do cliches and worn-out old phrases make you want to hiss? When someone says "Think outside the box," do you feel like stuffing them inside a box? Are you going to scream if you hear some kid say "like, you know" one more time?

This is my growing list of some of the most overused words and phrases that really ought to be retired.

Like

"And he was like, 'Seriously?,' and I'm like, 'Yeah,' and he's like, 'No way,' and I'm like..."

Aaauuuuuuggggghhhhhhh! Make it stop!

For some reason, "like" is more annoying than filler words such as "uh" and "um." Those filler words convey nervousness or low self-confidence. "Like" is, like, vacuous.

You Know

This one is ALMOST as bad as "like." To my dismay, "you know" is a dear friend of "like." They always hang out together.

"It's, like, you know..."

Whatever

The problem with this word isn't just that it's overused. The biggest problem I have with "whatever" is that it expresses contempt. It's dismissive, the verbal equivalent of rolling your eyes. Even if contempt is deserved, saying "whatever" rarely makes the speaker look good.

My Two Cents

This one is a crutch for almost everyone. I've even used it from time to time. This phrase is innocuous enough and doesn't seem to make people throw fits, but it is getting a little worn and tired.

Literally

Ever watch Princess Bride? Remember when Inigo tells Vizzini, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means?" "Literally" is one of those type of words.

"Literally" isn't a word you use for emphasis. It's a word you use when you say something that shouldn't just be interpreted figuratively. For example, if you jumped so high that you bumped your head, you could say, "I literally hit the ceiling."

But if you say that you literally worked your butt off, it doesn't mean you worked really hard. It means you don't have a butt anymore.

Then again, people overuse the word "literally" even if they're technically using it correctly. If you drove your car into a ditch, you can just say so and leave it at that. People probably don't need to hear the word "literally" to understand what you're saying.

Think Outside the Box

OK, time to put this business cliché back in the box now.

This buzzword was used to death by business execs who thought it sounded good. It promotes creative thinking, yet it has been repeated so much that it's become musty, flat, and uninspiring. It also sounds pretentious.

It's Not Rocket Science

Fortunately I don't hear this one much any more, but I remember a time when it came up a lot. Something about it makes me twitch. Can't we say "It's not brain surgery" instead?

F*** Off!

Much as I dislike cussing, I realize that colorful obscenities are a part of just about every language. Everyone has their own form of swearing, even if they say something mild like "darn it" or make up something silly like "fummydoodles."

The problem is that when profanity is overused, it makes many people uncomfortable. It's unprofessional and reflects badly on the speaker. And finally, the words themselves lose their power with overuse.

If four-letter-words are always used for the most mundane things--dropping your keys, criticizing the slow service at a restaurant, complaining when someone forgets to put the juice back in the fridge--are they still powerful enough to express outrage when someone steals your wallet or parks in front of your driveway?

Think of the Children

A stinky political cliché that tries to make you feel guilty if you're opposed to some law that drains your pocketbook or violates your rights in some way. If you're not willing to give up some freedoms (or at least the conveniences you grew up with), you must be in favor of child abuse. How dare you put your own selfish whims ahead of the children!

But Wait!

But wait, there's more! Call now and you'll get this fabulous egg-laying, multi-purpose rubber chicken ABSOLUTELY FREE! Wow!

Awesome

A lot of people say they HATE this one. They're all but screaming and tearing their hair out over it.

According to Dictionary.com, "awesome" is a word that means "inspiring awe." But what does "awe" mean? "An overwhelming feeling of reverence, admiration, fear, etc., produced by that which is grand, sublime, extremely powerful, or the like."

There aren't a lot of truly awesome things in the world.

No Problem

I feel sorry for anyone who works in customer service and says "no problem" when anyone thanks them. If the comments at the bottom of this page are any indication, these well-meaning people are going to get mauled by someone who's sick of hearing it.

Say "you're welcome" instead. It's safer!

At the End of the Day

Properly translated, "at the end of the day" means, "I'm about to say something clever and profound!"

Every time a newscaster utters this hackneyed phrase, somebody pukes.

I Could Care Less

If you say this, you're saying that you DO care. Because if you DIDN'T care, it would be impossible to care less than you actually do.

That's why the phrase is correctly said, "I couldn't care less."

My Bad

My favorite definition of "my bad" comes from Urban Dictionary:

"I did something bad, and I recognize that I did something bad, but there is nothing that can be done for it now, and there is technically no reason to apologize for that error, so let's just assume that I won't do it again, get over it, and move on with our lives."

Not only is "my bad" grammatically incorrect, it's a flippant apology.

Seriously? Really?

Mr. Seriously can be found lurking on discussion forums and the comment sections of blogs. First someone says something stupid, offensive, or just plain unpopular. Someone else comes along and says "Seriously?" Then they proceed to snark and spew vitriol.

"I LOVE POKÉMON!!!"

"Pokémon? Seriously? Dude, get a life."

Let's not forget about Mr. Seriously's cousin, Miss Really. Someone gets riled up by a different point of view, paraphrases it to sound as inflammatory as possible, then finally punctuates it with "Really?"

"I support the right to bear arms."

"So you support violence and death and little kids shooting themselves? Really?"

Victoria's Overused Words and Phrases

Just to be fair, here are some words and phrases I catch myself using a lot...

  • Otherwise
  • For example
  • For some reason
  • For the most part
  • I dunno
  • I guess
  • I think
  • In general
  • People
  • Probably
  • Something like that
  • Tend
  • Well

Some words are used heavily because it's HARD find a substitute for perfectly good words that convey the right meaning or tone. Other words are difficult to give up because they're so comfortably ingrained in our habits.

What's a word or phrase that really bugs you?

What's Your Pet Peeve?

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    • profile image

      Sean 13 months ago

      "Amazing": the most overused, exaggerated, embellishing adjective in the English language.

      i.e. "It was amazing how the sun came up today!"

      "a little bit": the most overworked, meaningless non-qualifying qualifier used endlessly by sportscasters during games and on sports talk shows subconsciously covering their asses when offering analysis.

      i.e. "Coming off that off season ending motorcycle accident where his femur was shattered into pieces he seems to be favoring that right leg...just a little bit."

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      Ginny 13 months ago

      I dislike "guess what?" People stick it in a sentence and don't even give us time to guess. What's the point?

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      DP 2 years ago

      "Soz" or my brothers version "Sozzles" as a substitute for "Sorry". It's as dismissive as "Whatever", lacks any real remorse, feel extremely disrespectful especially when you're already angry and it's not even a real word! Like nails down a blackboard to me.

      Also, the phrase "Suck it up" is a very rude way of telling someone to get over something, one I am very embarassed to admit I used every other day until I got a telling off I richly deserved after using it during a row with my Mum.

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      teep 2 years ago

      "It's all good" is as bad as "it is what it is."

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      CrossLite 2 years ago

      How many times can a Media (TV & Radio) personality use "as well" in 3 continuous sentences. Overused, redundant, trite and stupid phrase of all time!

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      Ev 2 years ago

      I'm getting pretty sick of "perfect storm" and "boots on the ground".

    • Joshua Crowder profile image

      Joshua Crowder 3 years ago from Akron, Ohio

      I hate the word literally. I have probably only used it 100 x's time in my life, but I tend to hear people use it out of context at least once a day everyday.

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      Johnd784 3 years ago

      This actually answered my drawback, thank you! kefkeddagdae

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      rutko60 4 years ago

      Actually

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      deannemaria-santinidevencia 4 years ago

      A few days ago I went into a particular shop to make a purchase. The goods that I required were out of stock. I asked the Customer service assistant to Order the goods for me; he replied - "yes madam, I can 'PRE-ORDER' this for you. I said no, I just want to ORDER IT. HE Just didn't get it. ORDER will suffice....

      This overuse and incorrectly used Prefix 'pre' (before) is my pet hate.

      pre comes from the Latin word prae meaning before. This prefix is used to mean 'before' in time, place, order, degree or importance.

      Here is a selection of words using this prefix.

      preamble (noun) - a preliminary statement.

      preamplifier / preamp (noun) - an electronic device that amplifiers a weak signal (usually a microphone or record-player) to a level suitable for a power amplifier.

      pre-arrange (verb) - arrange beforehand.

      precaution (n) action taken beforehand to avoid risk or ensure a good result.

      precede (verb) - come or go before in time, order or importance.

      precedent (noun) - a legal term referring to a previous case taken as a guide for subsequent cases or justification. In more common use, a precedent is an action or behaviour that indicates a possible future action. For example, "Are you setting a precedent by arriving late this morning?".

      prefix (noun) - a verbal element placed at the beginning of a word to qualify its meaning. For example, the opposite of a conformist is a non-conformist. In the previous sentence, non is the prefix.

      Misuse of the prefix in modern language.

      I have noticed several misuses of pre when signwriters and copyeditors coin new words.

      Medical insurance companies ask if you have have any pre-existing conditions. Surely they are asking what conditions you currently have that could affect the insurance policy?

      Pre-exist is not in my dictionary. What is meant by pre-existing? Is it something that existed before but doesn't exist now?

      When you are confronted by the pre-existing word, please ask the speaker if they meant existing.

      Another popular word is pre-order. Retail advertising implores me to "pre-order my copy NOW!". Why can't I just order the product? Pre-ordering implies I place the order previous to the release of a product. Surely the phrase "order your copy NOW" carries the same meaning without the unnecessary burden of a prefix?

    • profile image

      christopher-hall-1069 4 years ago

      fast up and coming moron speak: "it is what it is"

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      jerry-serafine 4 years ago

      "That being said..." Drives me crazy! How about just, "however,..."

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      coopertm 4 years ago

      The ubiquitous use of "share" for other, perfectly good verbs. "Share" seems to connote an intimacy that isn't necessarily wanted or appropriate.

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      christopher-hall-1069 4 years ago

      The two most overused idiot America words are without a doubt the two listed below, watch any afternoon TV show such as Judge Judy every other word out of these morons mouths have actually surplanted the word LIKE. Makes me want to smash their heads with a baseball bat.

      (1) ISSUE when meaning problem

      (2) BASICALLY

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      cropland-hornsplay 4 years ago

      I know, right?

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      kletusramses 4 years ago

      I'm so damn sick of idiots saying: 'amazing', 'annoying, 'awesome', 'right?', and not knowing the difference between 'it's' and 'its'. This last one I see about 20 times a day. You don't write 'hi's' and 'her's' do you? Which just of course immediately brings to mind apostrophe abuse...Especially using apostrophes to pluralize: 'How many game's do you have?' or 'Jake and Son's' at the front of a store shop. Maddening.

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      michael-schmitt-90260 4 years ago

      @phaedeaux: Or, "the clock reads 12:00".

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      michael-schmitt-90260 4 years ago

      @michael-schmitt-90260: Edit...sorry. Remove worn

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      michael-schmitt-90260 4 years ago

      Look. Politicians use this all the time. They mean "Listen to me,worn I'm right". I can't "look" at your words, Dumass. Also: At the end of the day. When I hear this I say: At the end of the day the clock reads 12:00.

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      xkini10 4 years ago

      Hands down, (sorry if that is one of your peeves) SAME EXACT. I cringe when I hear it from someone very eloquent, for example, QVC and HSN.

    • imagelist lm profile image

      imagelist lm 4 years ago

      Interesting lens!

    • profile image

      transformers935 5 years ago

      Phrases would be I could care less, I don't care, or ask me if I care. People will often say, "I don't care what you think of me", when they really mean I disagree with your assessment of me. When a person is bored with the conversation, they will either say "I could care less, I don't care or ask me if I care". What they should actually say is something like "You are boring me to death. I would like to talk about something else." or "I don't share your enthusiasm with the topic you are discussing. I would like to talk about something that interests me.". If the person truly didn't care, they would be doing something else while the person is talking and not paying attention. Not caring is being indifferent. Being indifferent is not the same as disagreeing, being irritated, or being bored. When people say, "I could care less", they are actually contradicting what they are trying to say but saying what they are really thinking. It is one of those paradoxes.

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      susan-smith2 5 years ago

      double down, kick the can down the road, talking points

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      sayki-atric 5 years ago

      Phrase would be.. I'm a person to...or Sorry I am human.

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      sayki-atric 5 years ago

      There are a few.... Feet, meal and work come to mind.

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      Eastender 5 years ago

      - a lot

      - thankyou

      - could of

      - would of

      - should of, etcetera

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      Eastender 5 years ago

      - a lot

      - thankyou

      - could of

      - would of

      - should of, etcetera

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      jasonrn 5 years ago

      - Collaborate (and all of its made-up conjugates such as collaborative, collaboratively, etc.)

      - "At this point in time". How about right now?

      -

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      angelosdaughter 5 years ago

      @abc4u: I have to defend "etc". I use it when the complete list of whatever I am citing would bore the listener/reader to tears. I give a couple of examples, then add 'etc' to indicate that the list goes on and on. I suppose I could just say '...and the list goes on and on'.

      The improper use of 'it's' in the possessive case has driven me crazy for years. The only time 'it' takes an apostrophe is when it's a contraction for 'it is'.

      Another thing I find repulsive is the media penchant for smashing together the names of celebrity couples such as 'Brangelina' or compacting a single name such as the current 'KPatz' and 'RStew' all of which remind me of a car wreck in which two cars are mashed together. The media is responsible for many of grammatical atrocities that enter the language.

    • profile image

      angelosdaughter 5 years ago

      I am becoming sick of:

      must-have

      sheeple

      And REALLY sick of any adjective used with the word 'good', as in 'scary good', 'yummy good' etc,

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      Eastender 5 years ago

      - Bear with me

      - Basically

      - At the end of the day

      - Awesome

      - Fantastic

      - Like

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      teleny 5 years ago

      Iconic. Used to mean "so famous and laden with meaning as to inspire reverence, like a Byzantine religious painting". Now means something like "you'd recognize it if you saw it".

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      ntown123 5 years ago

      "As well" is so overused. It could almost always be replaced with "too". Often it doesn't need to be said at all. Just count the number of times you hear someone say "as well" tomorrow.

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      fluxappeal1 5 years ago

      The new overuse of the term "bespoke" by non Brits just looking to sound intelligent and exclusive...snort, my captcha for this comment is "cow twit"

    • profile image

      fluxappeal1 5 years ago

      The new overuse of the term "bespoke" by non Brits just looking to sound intelligent and exclusive...snort, my captcha for this comment is "cow twit"

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      Natural_Skin_Care 5 years ago

      My pet peeve is 'needs fixed' instead of 'needs to be fixed' followed closely by people that repeatedly start sentences with 'um'.

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      teacher3 5 years ago

      @xkini10: YES! I have thought of counting the number of times the word "absolutely" is used on QVC. Another word that is overused...amazing. Another phrase that is overused..."on so many levels"-as in, "This is wrong on so many levels." Another phrase, which is mostly used by young women and teenages.."I know, right?", and in the same vein, "OK??" Another word that is heavily overused..."just". And, another phrase that I hope fades away quickly..."I am just so over it!" I hear older women use these phrases, and it's pitiful. Are they trying to identify with their teenagers? is that their conversational language at home with the teens?

      Something else I see a great deal in texting, Facebook, blogs, forums, etc...all the grammatical mistakes. Is it my imagination, or have the mistakes increased in the last year? Doesn't anyone type out contractions correctly anymore? What about the use of capital letters when appropriate? As a 3rd grade teacher, it is my job to teach my students the correct use of grammar...speaking and writing. I'm not going to get very far if their main examples are what I listed above. Even adults who have blogs are some of the worst offenders.

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      robert-williams2 5 years ago

      I Can't believe you did not even list this totally, completely over used word that has spread across the country. One more piece of horse-shit that starts in So-Cal and becomes sickening. People using the word "SO" in front of every sentence. Even folks here are starting to notice. SO SO SO SO SO SO SO Bothersome!!

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      xkini10 5 years ago

      @gman47527: remember when a virus was a bad thing?!?! We as Americans have too many words.

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      xkini10 5 years ago

      @mfwills: that is overused also...it is used on QVC by the hosts...very annoying

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      xkini10 5 years ago

      @patty-childress: To expand on your comment, the waiter addresses you (both male and female) as guys, i.e. "Can I get you guys anything else???" Uh yeah, how about a sex change...

    • profile image

      xkini10 5 years ago

      saaaaaame exaaaaaact makes my hair stand on end...also..."just sayin" Hate them both.....

    • profile image

      WinWriter 5 years ago

      Great idea for a lens.

      I'm tired of "just sayin'" and barbecue dinner invites that include the words "...and all the fixin's"

    • profile image

      WinWriter 5 years ago

      Great idea for a lens.

      I'm tired of "just sayin'" and barbecue dinner invites that include the words "...and all the fixin's"

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      PhloxPapyrus 5 years ago

      I'm tired of "It's gonna be alright" and "pretty much" gratuitously, but they are just inevitable...

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks.

    • Sher Ritchie profile image

      Sher Ritchie 5 years ago

      "Proactive" - it's supposed to mean "inclined to act, inclined to do something (rather than twiddle thumbs or otherwise prevaricate)" but what's wrong with existing words for the same, like dynamic and/or decisive and/or energetic? Those words have character. "Proactive" is so bland - pro (that is in favor of) and active (doing something/ operational/etc) - what does this combination really mean? It's typically used by people who want to devalue dynamism, decisiveness and energy; "Oh no" (they seem to be saying) "We don't believe in that here, we've taken the action out of active and instead generated... proactivity." Please, no more "proactives" - let's have action, decisiveness, etc!

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      patty-childress 5 years ago

      Enjoy...Waiters plop your plate down and say enjoy. Your friend emails pages of pictures of her last vacation and ends the note with enjoy. I get to decide if I enjoyed the meal, company, movie, etc. Enjoy!

    • profile image

      patty-childress 5 years ago

      Enjoy...Waiters plop your plate down and say enjoy. Your friend emails pages of pictures of her last vacation and ends the note with enjoy. I get to decide if I enjoyed the meal, company, movie, etc. Enjoy!

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      jamie-hankins 5 years ago

      Here's another - 'SO' This one has almost driven me to homicide, genocide, terrorism, and suicide all in one minute. How can something be SO not happening, if it's already not happening to begin with? Another one I'm hearing a LOT lately is 'game changer' to describe bland watered down subjects or objects - Seems to be in place of 'amazing'. I'm hearing it everywhere.

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      jamie-hankins 5 years ago

      What about 'yafeelme" and "right now"? "OMG are you seriously asking me that right now?" Drives me fuggin' bananas - I've walked out of movie theaters because of them.

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      ad101867 5 years ago

      I'm getting sick of hearing (nearly every time I watch TV or read an article) how somebody's on a metaphorical "journey." I now avoid that word like the plague (did I just say "like the plague"?) and won't even buy a Journey although it seems like a good vehicle. :-|

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      SDPupp 5 years ago

      Everyone is using "literally" in literally every bleeping story they tell.

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      karabo-moumakwe 5 years ago

      'Basically' and the mother of all cliches: "LOL"

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      ih8mycow 5 years ago

      Think outside the box is probably the most overused phrase in the office. My annoying coworker always say this especially in a brainstorming. It gets old and uninspiring. I sent him an anonymous email once through this site called ihatemycoworker.com (yes, that's a real site) asking him to change his "brainstorming cliché". It seemed to work. I only hear him say it twice in a meeting.

    • DIY Mary profile image

      DIY Mary 5 years ago

      "Whatever" tops my list of most odious expressions. It has the stench of contempt.

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      dschexnaydre 5 years ago

      "So" and "right?" So, the question is what's your pet peeve, right? We all have pet peeve's, right? So, my pet peeve, right, is when people over use the words "so" and "right," right?

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      phaedeaux 5 years ago

      This may be just in Australia, but everyone being interviewed on television feels compelled to begin each answer with the word "look..." I mean, its television. We are already looking.

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      aaron-tan 5 years ago

      I have never heard someone use the phrase "my two cents" in real life. I hear it occasionally on TV, but is it really that overused?

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      phaedeaux 5 years ago

      "At the end of the day". Get in quick with "It's going to get dark."

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      70sfreezeframe 5 years ago

      Recently I've been seeing :

      "Oh the joys" - describing any task being undertaken

      "Me thinks" - referencing any thought of future task

      "pffft / meh" - my personal favourites, illiciting the inevitable ...

      "Wot's up hun x" - everyone's 'hun' and gets kisses at the end

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Something that really drives me up the wall is "drives me up the wall" and improper use of its and it's .... It's so annoying!!!! it's = it is and its = possessive!!! and also i am really sick of "Hows it going?" Not only is it from the 80's, but it makes me feel that i am in the presence of someone who can't say "How are you doing?" .. Also, i have NO IDEA what the response is supposed to be... So when someone says "Howzitgoin?" to me, I'm akin to someone who just sat in the wrong Airplane seat.. what do you say? "itzgoinwel" ???

    • SecondHandJoe LM profile image

      SecondHandJoe LM 5 years ago

      You Know

    • SecondHandJoe LM profile image

      SecondHandJoe LM 5 years ago

      Awesome lens, but wait-at the end of the day, I could care less- So, my bad and F___ off!

      'Liked' it- lotta fun, thanks!

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      rexycat 5 years ago

      I am sick of hearing the word issues used about someone or somethingsuch as my son has skin issues my mum has hip issues, my cooker has issues. Just stop it . It is a denial word for problem. I also remember when issues were magazine installments.I cringe when i here a person say this word, they seem to think for some reason it makes them sound smart and more inteligent.

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      Mike413 5 years ago

      Another one you hear a lot especially in the last few years that definitely belongs on this list is "I mean." That's getting to be as bad as "like." I mean really. People just use it way too much. Seriously, I mean it's not even funny. ;)

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      prague1 5 years ago

      Just putting it out there!

      Its used to soften a harsh comment, or viewpoint, suggestion, or making a request they really want you to do but without making it sound like they're telling what to do.

      Lke the song John Mayer sings - say what you need to say

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      mfwills 6 years ago

      Absolutely.

      I just herd an interview on NPR with a woman who has a Master's Degree in English. She responded to the interviewer's question with "Absolutely" at least eight times. When did "absolutely" take over for "yes?"

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      abanana1986 6 years ago

      Using "OK" before and after sentences for no reason. Similar to the first sentence under the "Think Outside the Box" heading.

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      DanCooper 6 years ago

      Here are two words that are not used enough. "Thank you. " As in, thank you for making a great lens. :)

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      agent009 6 years ago

      A lot of words such as "like" are just placeholder words when people don't know what to say.

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      ErHawkns7100 6 years ago

      I despise it when people say 'my bad'.

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      gman47527 6 years ago

      I hate hearing the response, "I'm good," when people are is asked how they are or if they would like something, such as, "Would you like something to drink?" "No, I'm good."

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      gman47527 6 years ago

      Although sometimes popular sayings make the language more colorful or are used for brevity, I don't understand the fascination with the term, "Right from the GET-GO." Saying, "Right from the start," is clearer and shorter.

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      gman47527 6 years ago

      I'm tired of hearing about things "going viral"

    • Lemming13 profile image

      Lemming13 6 years ago

      In England, there's a horrible habit of using the word 'sad' to mean annoying, irritating, mean or nasty. 'You took my sweets - oh, that's sad of you!' Sad means unhappy, or in the case of baking, collapsed. It annoys me so much to hear it misused this way. And 'fit' does not mean attractive, it means healthy, sporting, or suitable for a purpose. Which makes it an insulting way to refer to a person you allegedly admire, unless you are complimenting their athleticism. An excellent lens.

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      Emeraldroots 6 years ago

      The phrase "foreign" to refer to things or people from other countries..most people outside the U.S. use the term "overseas" , foreign always seems to mean "not belonging" out of place". I hazard to guess a U.S, citizen travelling abroad would rather be referred to as American or "visitor"....unlike what we always default to calling people not of American origin here...just saying =)

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      Lance855 6 years ago

      @pilotboy71: I agree, that word is so overused.

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      Lance855 6 years ago

      "AMAZING" that word is so overused. Another is "oh my god".

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      Lankyman 6 years ago

      One very overused word in the English language is the word "relocate". It really gets right up my nose. Has anyone ever considered opting for the word "move" for a change?

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      gherishjhoven 6 years ago

      "Oh common"... :) That the most over used word for me... This is a great lens, from you...

    • gregoryolney lm profile image

      gregoryolney lm 6 years ago

      I have never understood how people could say "I could care less" when they mean exactly the opposite ! And as for "Oh my god" and "awesome" - makes me shudder, especially when they are used in the same sentence !

    • Phillyfreeze profile image

      Ronald Tucker 6 years ago from Louisville, Kentucky

      I have personally use the phrase "my bad" on many occasions but not as much anymore...as an urban slang for an apology it has got me out of some tense situations in public, especially when riding publictransportation.

      I appreciate your correction for using the term "I could care less"...If you didn't care it would be impossible to care less that you actually do! Excellent grammatical analogy.

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      pilotboy71 6 years ago

      The new most overused word as far as I'm concerned is..."AMAZING!" All of a sudden, everyone and everything is AMAZING! There really are thousands of other options to describe a notable person or event!

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      FieldingMelish 6 years ago

      @BrightSpot: You just used "Seriously?", "Really?", "my bad" and "at the end of the day".

      Are you calling the kettle, black?

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      FieldingMelish 6 years ago

      You just used "Seriously?", "Really?", "my bad" and "at the end of the day".

      Are you calling the kettle, black?

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      BrightSpot 6 years ago

      Just pointed out to my beautiful, beloved wife that she used the word "like" 4 times in a single sentence. She hung up on me. Seriously?! I mean, c'mon! Really?! It, like, literally drives me up the wall. Whatever. I'll just accept it as my bad, because at the end of the day, she'll forgive me. And anyway, I could care less if she's a little upset.

      Oh, goodness that felt terrible...

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      MichaelTJones 6 years ago

      Haha! Funny lens!

      "like" and "literally" can drive you up the walls! literally!

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      iRenew 6 years ago

      "of course" used to mean yes.

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      FieldingMelish 6 years ago

      "face time"

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      gagirl60 6 years ago

      It is what it is, just sayin'

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      bolillie 6 years ago

      I hate the "f" word. It sounds tacky and uneducated.

      I also get really tired of people saying something is amazing. It seems to be the only word folks know how to use to describe something wonderful, fantastic, brilliant, exceptional, excellent, incredible, unique, different, awesome, terrific, or even good. I hear it so often that it has no effect any more. If someone says something is amazing, I immediately think it's average. If it was truly amazing they could find a more specific adjective to use. And, after all, how many things in this world can truly be amazing anyway? Aren't some things simply good, adequate, normal?

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      Mutti 6 years ago

      Reach out - I heard this phrase being used several times during two conference calls yesterday.

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      citznmag 6 years ago

      So basically....As I sit here watching and listening to a plaintiff on The People's Court state his case, I was distracted by his overuse of the words, "so basically" before making each point. I counted 15 times--so basically.....it drove me NUTS!

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      FieldingMelish 6 years ago

      @esil66: I agree. Drives me nuts.

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      FieldingMelish 6 years ago

      These days it seems all news is "Breaking News".

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      Superlative list! Another that makes me cringe is "a tad bit". Wrong in so many ways. A tad IS a bit, so you're redundantly saying "a bit bit", if you wanted to use this correctly you'd just say "a tad", but better yet, don't say tad either. It's annoying. The absolute most cringe-worthy phrase in the English language (so offensive I can hardly bring myself to type it here) is "I busted my hump". It's used when someone means to say, "I worked so hard." To say it should incur a mandatory prison sentence..

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      AndusMcabu 6 years ago

      "as if" at the start of every other sentence and "init" or "it's not even funny" at the end of every other sentence are ones i'm fed up of hearing all the time at the moment

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      Blusteel 6 years ago

      Good subject.

      Several overused phrases & words come to mind straight away:

      1. 'GREAT'

      listening to any televised sporting event or contest is one way to quickly encounter this overused word.

      Many folks (myself included, when not conscious of it), appear to be *simply inserting the word

      GREAT'

      For describing everything done well in any given situation.

      (*nearly used word 'literality' here)

      2. 'SCARY'

      Appears in our 'Fear Everything' Info Era, nearly all concerning societal issue is 'Really Scary'

      20-Yr Nat'l Violent Crime Rate (adjusted for Population Growth)

      DOWN 20%

      20-Yr Overall Media Coverage of Violent Crime(s)

      UP 625%

      Weary of the tired, 'It's just SCARY'

      Webster's Thesaurus has dozens of entry's here;

      Spooky, frightening, alarming, anxious. ect

      C'mon people, if your going to buy-in to the hype-machine

      Bookmark a free thesaurus and mix it up here and there

      3. '[They|He|She] THREW [Me|Him|Her|Us] UNDER THE BUS'

      So...where is this so-called BUS, anyway?

      Lastly. the most cringe-inducing 1½-2 Yr resurgent phrase

      Simply will not fade away (as hoped):

      4. The 'AH-HA MOMENT'

      If I could PURCHASE this nausea-inducing phrase to take it permenantly out of the rotation

      I would w/o hesitation.

      Not sure why, it simply hits the ear as distracting, pretentious fluff.

      I sincerely do not care for this phrase

      FEW MORE FOR THE ROAD:

      'Staying focused'

      'Not letting things slip thru the cracks'

      'ANYway'

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      JeremiahStanghini 6 years ago

      Ha ha! I loved this lens. Thanks for doing this.

      With Love and Gratitude,

      Jeremiah