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Incredible Voyage Explorer Columbus 1492 Orient Gold & Spice __ Triggered Battle of Good & Evil

Updated on September 29, 2013

Who was Christopher Columbus ?

Christopher Columbus was born in the Italian city state, Genoa in the year 1451. A key significant event in the early years of Christopher Columbus in that culture of voyagers and seamen of Genoa was the conquest of Eastern Roman Empire Capital of Contantinople by the Ottaman Turks when Columbu just 2 years old growing up in the City State Genoa.

Constantinople was a prosperous trade center that connected the Orient with Europe. This prosperous city, known then as impregnable for a millenium earlier, was also the spiritual capital of Easterm Orthodox Church. The Ottaman Turks under the leadership of Mehmed II captured Contantinople in an historic battle in 1453.

For the trading cities such as Genoa where Columbus grew up, loss of Constantinople brought much economic hardship as trade routes via the silk road that connect such trade dependent port city as Genoa no longer had safe access to the spice and other riches of the orient in China, Japan, and India.

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Three Ships Westward

__In Search of Orient Riches by Trade

In that time period, the earth was not flat but a globe was accepted particularly among the ship merchant families of Europe. But knowledge of what lay west was mostly uncharted with much fiction as facts then available in the maps and mapmakers that were vital for ship captains and crew of that era.

So this is the early years ambition of what transpired for the 1451 Columbus Voyage of three ships westward, Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa María, in search of a new trade route to the Orient nations of China, Japan and India.

Columbus approached the Portugese royalty first with his proposal for several years and were turned down by the royalty. Historian have assessed the reason for the turndown is due to the fact an alternate trade route around Africa to the Orient had just been found by another Portugese explorer. His approach to ruling monarchs of Genoa and Florence did not get a positive response by the time he approached the King and Queen of Spain who accepted his proposal for 3 vessal voyage going west.

Explorer Vespuchi Americus

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To the day Columbus died on 1506, after completing 4 journeys, he thought he had found the route to the Orient, not knowing that he had discovered the New Continents called America, named after a subsequent voyager Vespuchi Americus (1454-1512) .

Columbus though initially honored for the gold and new world wealth he brought back, essentially died poor and dishonored for not finding sufficient gold and spices that the royal sponsors of his voyage, King and Queen of Spain demanded.

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Gold Brought Back On Columbus Voyage 01

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.It is not clear to me how much gold Columbus brought back on his first voyage. There are some indication that he did bring back some gold. The long letter he wrote to King Fardinand on 15th February, 1493 upon return to Canary Island speaks much about the island and the people of the Indies he encountered and the new names he bestowed on these island to honor the King, Queen and Christian Faith.

He talked about his own generosity and desire to give and receive little from these people he encountered except a clear indication of his interest in converting these "Indians' to "our charished faith", namely Christianity.

America was eventually named after a near contemporary of Columbus (1451-1506) named Americus Vespucius (1454-1512) .

Vespucii grew up on City State of Florence and had as an early patron the elder merchant family ruler of Florence, Lorenzo de Medici (1449 -1492).

It is not easy to forget, dear audience, that it was the same Lorenzo de Medici who was also the first patron of the painter scientist, Leonardo Da Vinci, the merchant prince of Florence, Italy.

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