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Maori language resources for Early Childhood Education

Updated on October 30, 2012

Bicultural resources for the NZ Early Childhood Curriculum

New Zealand is a bicultural nation and as such Maori culture and language is woven into the national curriculum statement for early childhood education - The Whariki.

Following is a selection of resources developed for use in the early childhood education sector. Each is focussed on the development of Maori language skills in an authentic context, but also relate to a variety of strands and goals from Te Whariki.

Colour collages

One way to get tamariki actively involved in learning colours in The Reo is to have them make colour collages to display. These ones were made with a group of 3 and 4 year olds from fabric scraps and craft materials. Once displayed on the wall they were used at mat times when singing "Ma is white, whero is red..." (Scroll further don the page for a link to the lyrics for this song).

Not only were the children very proud of their creations, but it helped them discover and develop different ways to be creative and expressive in a bicultural context.

Relates to Te Whariki, Communication strand, Goal 4.

Number collages

Similar in concept to the colour collages are these artworks depicting the numbers 1 - 10 in The Reo. These ones made use of natural materials the children found around the centre, providing the opportunity to develop a relationship with the natural environment.

Relates to Te Whariki, Communication strand, Goal 3, and Exploration strand, Goal 4.

Body parts

This display was an interactive resource where the names of the body parts could be taken off the wall for children to then try to put back in the correct place. It was also useful at mat times when singing the Maori version of "Head, shoulders, knees and toes". (There is a link to the lyrics for this song further down the page!).

Relates to Te Whariki, Communication strand, Goal 2.

Maori Bingo game

For the older children a Maori bingo game was developed, called "Wharewhare". It works just like a normal bingo game, but Maori words are called out. To make it easier for the tamariki corresponding pictures are on each card. When a new word is being learnt, both the English and Maori words were used. This introduced an element of competition and made the learning of new words a lot of fun.

Relates to The Whariki, Communication strand, Goal 2, and Contribution strand, Goal 3.

Magnetic story

To help the children learn and understand a little bit about their local heritage and culture a magnetic story was developed based on a local Maori legend. This one depicts the story of how the Waikato River was formed. The children loved the interactive nature of the story, and were fascinated by the tale about geographical features they were already familiar with.

Relates to The Whariki, Communication strand, Goal 3, and Exploration strand, Goal 4.

Magna Visual  Magnetic Tape, 1-Inch X 50 Feet, Charcoal (MAVP240P)
Magna Visual Magnetic Tape, 1-Inch X 50 Feet, Charcoal (MAVP240P)

Great for making your own magnetic stories - just cut and stick.

 

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      this is really awesome

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      chaanah-oliver 5 years ago

      some very cool ideas here