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Sawfish

Updated on May 16, 2013

What Is A Sawfish?

A sawfish is a type of shark that is also known as a carpenter shark. You can tell that you are looking at a sawfish based on the saw that is similar to a swordfish's sword. Despite being nicknamed a carpenter shark, the sawfish is considered as a member of the rays family. Some species of Sawfish can grow to be 7 meters long which is the equivalence of 23 feet. Sawfish can get confused with sawsharks because they have a similar appearance, but be aware that they are two completely different animals. Sadly, the sawfish is considered as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The sawfish is an incredible creature, and I hope future generations may watch the sawfish swim in the waters of the ocean.

The Beginning of the Sawfish

The Sawfish evolved from now extinct sharks 56 million years ago in the Eocene Period. When sawfish first evolved from those sharks, they were diverse, but eventually, today's sawfish were linked to the modern sawfish family, Pristidae

Do Sawfish Harm Humans?

No, sawfish are completely harmless to humans if they are left out of human activity. Humans are too big for prey, but humans do harm sawfish. Because of this, sawfish need to have a way to defend themselves. So, if humans approach a sawfish, then that sawfish will attack if felt threatened. Sawfish as well as sharks and other marine life rarely kill humans, but it's just that their superior force makes them look like murderers (who is more likely to strangle someone, the salmon swimming by in the stream or that big shark).

Sawfish will not attack or harm humans unless the sawfish feels threatened, so we are best off leaving them alone.

Lifespan of a Sawfish

There is no data based on the lifespan of a sawfish, but we know that the seven species of sawfish live for a relatively long time in the oceans of the world.

How Do You Like The Sawfish?

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