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A Making Sense Of Smell Lesson Plan

Updated on May 18, 2015
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Christine, a wife, mother and homemaker for over 30 years, has an NVQ3 in Childcare & Education & loves cooking, music, health & nutrition.

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A kid's adventure exploring their sense of smell

Welcome to a Making Sense Lesson Plan, where you can explore our wonderful world with your group of children. In this lesson plan we will be looking at ways in which we can learn about our surroundings through the sense of smell. We will be having fun with singing, stories, arts and crafts and even a few experiements to discover how this one of our five senses is an integral part of our lives. Enjoy with your children a session of fun and creativity on a journey that will make them more aware of themselves and how they belong in this world.

If you would like further lesson plans on the five senses, see below.


Vote here for your favorite smell

What is your favorite smell?

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Introduce The Session With A Good Smell

Talk with the children about their sense of smell.

What part of their body do they use?

Make a list together of their favorite smells, such as the ideas in our poll. You could also have a few things, such as flowers for them to smell. Could they identify them with their eyes closed/blindfolded?

Create A Good Smell In House

See how you can prepare your room with stimulating smells to inspire them to focus on this one of their fives senses.

Set the atmosphere and add some fresh flowers.

A Rhyme- Can You Smell?

Discuss how good it is to smell our food and prepare us for eating it.

You can sing this to the tune of "Frere Jacques"

What is cooking, what is cooking

Can you smell, can you smell

Is it now ready, is it now ready

Can you tell, can you tell

Get the children to walk in a circle whilst singing this song.

Singing Time And Avoiding A Bad Smell

Ask the children why bodies might smell and show a wash bag with a selection of soaps, bubble bath, toothpaste etc. Discuss how they might use these to wash and care for their bodies to avoid a bad smell.

Sing these verses with the song "Here we go round the mulberry bush."

This is the way we (wash our face x3)

This is the way we wash our face on a cold and frosty morning.

This is the way we brush our hair... wash our hands... clean our teeth...

Follow Your Nose- Can You Smell Storytime? - Discover lots of things that smell in these smelly stories!

You could allow the children to take turns at scratching and sniffing the stickers in these story books.

You could read this cute story to illustrate.

A Story About A Sniffer Dog - Who used his nose

Talk about what a sniffer dog is and how dogs' sense of smell is much more acute than humans'!

Take Heed Of Your Nose

It's like a warning bell. It warns us of danger, such as leaking gas, burning or poisonous substances.

Arts & Crafts- Can You Draw Your Nose?

They could look in a mirror to draw their own, or sit opposite a partner and draw theirs.

Label your nose with the warning above!

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Craft A Good Smell In House

Give each child a large orange and a piece of ribbon. Get them to press a number of whole cloves into the orange, such as these ones here. Pin a length of colourful ribbon into the top to hang it on.

Things that smell for some time and make lovely decorations

Spicy World Cloves, Whole, 1 Pound
Spicy World Cloves, Whole, 1 Pound

An economical way to buy cloves that create a lovely aroma.

 

Please Sign The Sense Of Smell Guestbook - I love to sniff out your comments!

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    • Joanna14 profile image
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      Christine Hulme 4 years ago from SE Kent, England

      @ismeedee: Thank you Ismeedee! Yes- this could be adapted for any group of children.

    • ismeedee profile image

      ismeedee 4 years ago

      Very creative lens! Love the books you've added and the blindfold game. This lesson would work brilliantly with disabled children, too!