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Times Tables Made Easy

Updated on February 23, 2015

Getting Started with Times Tables

Multiplication tables or times tables as they are sometimes known, are usually the first thing that are learned after the basics of counting, additional and subtraction. As with all maths, the earlier you start, the easier it is, but it is never too late to learn.

The times tables are really useful in everyday life and will make your next stages of learning maths easier. The great news is that the Times Tables are easy to learn, particularly if you employ a few tricks. Read on to find out more.

Have fun - it helps us to learn.

Learning the Times Tables

The full times tables from 1 to 12 might look daunting at first - there are 144 to learn. But don't Panic - we are going to simplify it right down to something far more manageable. Once we have simplified it, we are going to provide you with techniques to make them easier to learn.

The Complete Times Tables

The Complete Times Tables
The Complete Times Tables

Simplifying the Times Tables

Great - you are still reading. 144 sums is a lot to learn, so lets make our lives easier and discard the ones that we don't really need to learn.

For starters, I am sure that most of us know the 1 times table - anything you multiply by 1 remains the same. Great, so we don't need to learn those ones.

The 2 times table is quite easy as you simply double the number or if you prefer, just add the number to itself (2 x 5 is the same as 5 + 5).

Similarly, the 10 times table is quite easy, as anything multiplied by 10, just gets a 0 added onto the end. So that does not need to be learned.

Lets watch a quick video which removes the numbers we don't need to learn.

Doing the 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 times tables on your hands

Using your hands to make things easier

One Times Table
One Times Table

Tricks for the 1 Times Table

Quite simply, anything that you multiply by 1, remains the same. It is that simple.

For example:

1 x 5 = 5

1 x 7 = 7

1 x 9 = 9

Two Times Table
Two Times Table

Tricks for the 2 Times Table

If you are happy doubling the numbers from 1 to 12, then you know your 2 times table. If not, then try adding the number you are multiplying by 2 to itself.

For example:

2 x 3 is the same as 3+3.

2 x 6 is the same as 6+6

2 x 9 is the same as 9+9

Three Times Table
Three Times Table

Tricks for the 3 Times Table

The trick that I used to learn my 3 times table was to double the number (like you do with the 2 times table), and then add the number again.

For example:

3 x 5 is the same as double 5, which is 10, with 5 added to it, which makes 15.

3 x 7 is the same as double 7, which is 14, with 7 added to it, which makes 21.

3 x 9 is the same as double 9, which is 18, with 9 added to it, which makes 27.

Four Times Table
Four Times Table

Tricks for the 4 Times Table

The 4 times table is almost as easy as the 2 times table. If you know your 2 times table, then this should be easy too.

Consider 4 x 5

This could be calculated by working out 2 x 5 and then multiplying the answer by 2! It is really that simple.

Try 4 x 3. That is 2 x 3, which is 6, and then 6 x 2 = 12. So 4 x 3 = 12.

Try 4 x 5. That is 2 x 5, which is 10, and then 10 x 2 = 20. So 4 x 5 - 20.

Five Times Table
Five Times Table

Tricks for the 5 Times Table

The 5x tables are generally quite easy to learn. Most children can count in fives, so working out the sum is just a case of counting up the fives.

An alternative, is the work out the 10 times table and halving the answer.

Six Times Table
Six Times Table

Tricks for the 6 Times Table

The method that I like to use, is to work out the answer for the 2 times table instead, and then add it to itself, three times.

For example:

6 x 5 is the same as 2 x 5, which is 10, added to itself twice, which is 10 + 10 + 10, which equals 30.

6 x 6 is the same as 2 x 6, which is 12, added to itself twice, which is 12 + 12 + 12, which equals 36.

Seven Times Table
Seven Times Table

Tricks for the 7 Times Table

The 7 times table is the hardest but don't fear - here are a couple of tricks.

Firstly, the hardest multiplication is 7 x 8 - I like to remember this as 5 6 7 8 - 56 is 7 x 8

Otherwise, the 7 times table can be derived from the 4 times table plus the 3 times table. For example:

7 x 8 is the same as 4 x 8 = 32 added to 3 x 8 = 24, giving an answer of 56.

Eight Times Table
Eight Times Table

Tricks for the 8 Times Table

The 8 times table is no more difficult than the 2 times table and doubling the answer and then doubling again.

For example:

8 x 5 can be calculated by working out 2 x 5, which is 10, then doubling, which is 20 and then doubling again, which makes 40.

8 x 6 can be calculated by working out 2 x 6, which is 12, then doubling, which is 24 and then doubling again, which makes 48.

Nine Times Table
Nine Times Table

Tricks for the 9 Times Table

The number 9 has many interesting properties that should help us with the multiplication.

Firstly any number that you multiply by 9, will have an answer which if you add the digits together, will give you a total of 9! Lets try it out:

4 x 9 = 36 and adding together the 3 and 6 gives us 9.

5 x 9 = 45 and adding together the 4 and 5 gives us 9.

6 x 9 = 54 and adding together the 5 and 4 gives us 9.

7 x 9 = 63 and adding together the 6 and 3 gives us 9.

So here is the trick. If you multiply a number by 9, the answer will add up to 9.

If the number you are multiplying by 9 is between 2 and 10 then the first digit of the answer will be the original number less one and the second digit will be how many more you need to add to it to make it add up to 9.

Time for an example:

Consider 2 x 9.

The first digit of the answer will be 2-1, which is 1 and the second digit will be 8, so that all the digits add up to 9. This makes 18.

Consider 3 x 9

The first digit of the answer will be 3-1, which is 2 and the second digit will be 7, so that all the digits add up to 9. This makes 27.

Consider 4 x 9

The first digit of the answer will be 4-1, which is 3 and the second digit will be 6, so that all the digits add up to 9. This makes 36.

Another technique is to use your fingers, which is explained on the following video.

Video Tutorial for 9 Times Table on Fingers

The following video shows a method of doing the 9 times tables on your fingers

Ten Times Table
Ten Times Table

Tricks for the 10 Times Table

Anything that you multiply by 10 simply has a zero placed at the end. For example:

10 x 5 = 50

10 x 6 = 60

Eleven Times Table
Eleven Times Table

Tricks for the 11 Times Tables

The 11 times table is quite easy for numbers less than 10. Any single digit that you multiply by 11, just has that same digit twice. For example:

11 x 2 = 22

11 x 3 = 33

11 x 4 = 44

For numbers greater than 9, add the digits together and then put that number between the two digits of the multiplier. For example:

11 x 10 can be calculated by adding 1 and 0, which is 1. Then split the multiplier 10 into 1 and 0 and place the sum from the previous calculation in the middle giving 1 1 0.

11 x 11 can be calculated by adding 1 and 1, which is 2. Then split the multiplier 11 into 1 and 1 and place the sum from the previous calculation in the middle giving 1 2 1.

11 x 12 can be calculated by adding 1 and 2, which is 3. Then split the multiplier 12 into 1 and 2 and place the sum from the previous calculation in the middle giving 1 3 2.

Easy

Twelve Times Table
Twelve Times Table

Tricks for the 12 Times Table

The 12 times table can be calculated in a number of ways but my preferred one is to multiply by 10 and multiply by 2, and then add the two results,

For example:

12 x 3 can be calculated by working out 10 x 3, which is 30 and adding 2 x 3, which is 6. This gives 36.

12 x 4 can be calculated by working out 10 x 4, which is 40 and adding 2 x 4, which is 8. This gives 48.

Have your say about Maths in School

How well is Maths taught in schools today?

Very well indeed

Very well indeed

Submit a Comment

  • Mykola 3 weeks ago

    Darts may give your operations emotial start! Especially teaching about substracting. Best wishes. Nick.

  • maraga 5 years ago

    it reminds me when i was a kid

  • Little Linda Pinda 5 years ago from Florida

    It was my favorite academic class. I also loved Home Economics and Physical Education. My mom always called me a "Walking Telephone Book" because I remember numbers better than names.

There is room for improvement

Submit a Comment

  • Lacy 5 years ago from Chenault

    That all depends on the district and more importantly the teacher. (but there is ALWAYS room for improvement)

  • anonymous 5 years ago

    Add more fun and minus the stress... multiplies the knowledge! :)

  • tmstrekkie 5 years ago

    God, all these tricks and tips - makes it more complex for my poor little brain to take in. We all learned by rote and I can still tell you the answer to all up to 12x! Sometimes the old ways are still the best.

  • aaxiaa lm 5 years ago

    There's a lot of room for improvement in my case... I always liked the 1 times table the best :P

  • Michelle 5 years ago from Central Ohio, USA

    Not very well and certainly not like this!

Your Comments and Suggestions are Most Welcome

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    • MJsConsignments profile image

      Michelle 5 years ago from Central Ohio, USA

      Great lens. I remember struggling through these in school way back when. My nearly 17 year old son never did learn all of them. He just uses his phone. I'm showing this to him!

    • MJsConsignments profile image

      Michelle 5 years ago from Central Ohio, USA

      Squid Angel blessed. This is a helpful lens that deserves attention. Good luck!

    • artbyrodriguez profile image

      Beverly Rodriguez 5 years ago from Albany New York

      We learned by rote when I was in school. But I still have a few little tricks of my own. Sadly, since the calculator, I've been forgetting my math.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks for the lens have you seen the website fish times tables activity at

      http://www.visnos.com/demos/fishtables

      it is really good!

    • LittleLindaPinda profile image

      Little Linda Pinda 5 years ago from Florida

      Algebra was one of my favorite classes. They put me in Advance Geometry but that didn't come so easy so I asked to go to the regular Geometry class.

    • Camden1 profile image

      Camden1 5 years ago

      One of the biggest fights I ever had with my daughter was in 3rd grade when I made her learn the times tables. She thought it was too hard - too bad we didn't know some of these tricks.

    • profile image

      FachanwaltMedizinrecht 5 years ago

      Some great tricks for the kids - thanks!

    • nicks44 profile image

      nicks44 5 years ago

      Nicely done with this one and remember to keep up the good work!

    • profile image

      JoshK47 5 years ago

      Great, educational lens! Thanks so much for sharing! :)

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      I loved studying math in school. Especially learning multiplication tables!

    • aliciamaggie54 profile image

      aliciamaggie54 5 years ago

      I remember learning time tables. I enjoyed learning to multiply. Thanks for the information.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      In the end... it adds up well! :)

    • JJNW profile image

      JJNW 5 years ago from USA

      Yay for tricks. Thanks for sharing.

    • Kumar P S profile image

      Kumar P S 5 years ago

      Nice lens ! Very useful for children. Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      sandi_x 4 years ago

      Great lens

    • profile image

      sandi_x 4 years ago

      Great lens

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