ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

A Simple Wooden Guitar or Banjo Stand

Updated on April 3, 2016
Mark this design out on a 4x8 sheet of plywood
Mark this design out on a 4x8 sheet of plywood
Cut out the two pieces.
Cut out the two pieces.
Lay 3 door hinges between the long sides of each piece.
Lay 3 door hinges between the long sides of each piece.
Separate the pieces far enough to allow the spine of the hinges to drop between them. Screw into place
Separate the pieces far enough to allow the spine of the hinges to drop between them. Screw into place
Set up the pieces and fold the legs in at a "V" to the spine.
Set up the pieces and fold the legs in at a "V" to the spine.
Use felt or foam to pad the head rest and saddle of the stand.
Use felt or foam to pad the head rest and saddle of the stand.
Stain and varnish for a natural wood look and set your banjo or guitar on it.
Stain and varnish for a natural wood look and set your banjo or guitar on it.

A Simple Wooden Stand

To make a wooden banjo or guitar stand, you need a piece of 4 by 9 foot /12 inch plywood. Cut it to the shape shown - basically an "L" shape with feet and a headrest. Measure your instrument and make sure you have a long enough headrest support. Don't go too high or you'll wind up with the headstock loose below the headrest piece.

Measure from the base of the instrument. About 3 inches below the nut is about right.

Make sure the legs are deep enough to reach beyond the body of the instrument.

Cut the two pieces apart, sand and varnish them. I'd do that before adding padding or hinges.

Set the pieces down and lay the hinges spine down so that the spine drops between the two legs of the stand. The flaps of the hinge will screw down to the inside. To make the stand fold really flat, you will want to recess the hinges so they are flat with the top of the wood.

Screw the hinges in place and set up the stand. Finally, add a strip of felt or weather stripping or some form of padding to the insides of the headrest and the saddle of the legs to protect the body of the banjo or guitar.

Stain and varnish it and you've got a nice little stand that looks great sitting in the corner of the stage and offers a place to put stickers and decorations from your road trip.

Have fun!


Hand Tooling

Give your wooden guitar stand a unique look by hand-carving designs in the sides. It's easier to do than you think. You can find simple instructions and designs with a hobby shop wood-burning kit. Before you stain and varnish your stand, sketch out your drawings or designs on the legs, inside and out. After that it's just a matter of time and a steady hand.

Once you've drawn or stenciled your design onto the wood, use a woodburning tool to trace the design pattern. You can also use a Dremel Moto-Tool or even carving tools to etch out the design. It's really not as hard as it looks. Once you have your design cut into the faces of the legs, go over it with light sandpaper and steel wool to make it smooth to the touch.

When you stain and varnish the wood, your design will pop out nicely giving your stand a hand-hewn look that's eye-catching and distinctive. You might even try some custom carrying handles for when you fold your gear up to carry it home.

Materials

What you'll need is at least a half sheet of 3/4 inch plywood. I like marine grade simply because it holds up longer if you spill beer on it a lot. I don't have that problem, but have some friends that do.

You'll also need a piano hinge and screws almost as long as your stand is tall with screws with which to attach it.

If you plan to stain and varnish it, you'll need that, of course, some rags, thinner and a place to work where your significant other won't yell at you about the smell.

If you do any carving or etching, you'll need whatever tools are necessary to pull off the job you have in mind. Of course, you could get some acrylic or oil paints and paint a design on it before you stain and varnish. Use a lighter stain if you are varnishing over painted-on designs.

TOOLS:

You'll need a sabre saw or band saw, drill with bits and screwdrivers, sandpaper or an orbital sander, steel wool, a brush for varnishing, and a rag for staining. You'll need tools for etching, woodburning, painting or carving if you elect to fancy up the wood faces. You probably have that stuff in your garage if you are even thinking about making your own guitar stand.



Hardwood version

Here's a version similar to this one made of more expensive solid wood planks. You can find these at Atlas-Stands.com on the web.
Here's a version similar to this one made of more expensive solid wood planks. You can find these at Atlas-Stands.com on the web. | Source

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • twayneking profile image
      Author

      twayneking 7 years ago from Puyallup, WA

      The measurements like the length of the neck and the width of the saddle at the bottom depend on the guitar. If you know those measurements, you can pretty much wing it with the rest of the measurements. I marked the distance from the base of the guitar to a spot 3 to 4 inches under the nut on the back of the neck. I made a mark there and then measured the thickness of the base of the guitar, added a few inches and then drew a perpendicular line. Then I hand drew a rough picture like the one in the diagrams, used a straightedge to clean up the lines and then cut out to identical pieces of plywood.

      Easy Peasy, and it's custom sized for your guitar. One for a bigger guitar will hold a smaller one, just not as snugly. Leave a little room for the padding.

      Have fun. If you like woodworking, you can route the edges and even do a little carving on the sides to decorate it a bit. A Dremel moto-tool is a great carving tool.

      Tom

    • profile image

      Kelly 7 years ago

      Looks pretty simple and sturdy. Did you make measurements for it?

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)