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And Then There Were Three... The Final Countdown to the Oscars.

Updated on March 1, 2014

The Films of 2013... Will Oscar Get It Right?

The year 2013 seems to have been a very fine--albeit less-than-earthshattering--year at the movies. I say "seems to have been" as (though I am loathe to admit it) my personal viewing this past year was rather lacking. However, I have still seen several excellent films, and have at this point seen enough to feel that I can begin commenting on this year's awards race. Also, I've decided to post reviews of the movies that are up for Academy Awards, including my estimation of the value of their nominations and possible chances for winning, and thought it might be nice to lead off with an article on the race as a whole. There were some real left-field contenders this year (Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa, anyone?), as well as some mind-boggling apparent snubs (Tom Hanks, Joaquin Phoenix, The Coen Brothers, etc.). Also, there was that so-far-out-of-left-field-it-was-nowhere-near-the-stadium hymn "Alone Yet Not Alone," whose nomination for Original Song was rescinded (one of the VERY few cases in Oscar history) after accusations of improper campaigning caused a great deal of heated controversy. And then there's the Cantonese/ Chinese Yi Dai Zong Shi (The Grandmaster), passed over for Foreign Language Feature but nominated for Cinematography and Costume Design, a rare occurrence made even more interesting by the fact that film's director, the internationally acclaimed and beloved Kar Wai Wong, has apparently never before helmed an Oscar-nominated feature (and he himself has yet to get a nod). It is also worth noting that another beloved Oriental maestro, Hayao Miyazaki, is himself nominated for his third Oscar in the Animated Feature category--for his last film as a director, Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises), an acclaimed film that sadly has the misfortune of squaring off against one of Disney Studios' biggest hits since the advent of Pixar, Frozen. Finally, this year saw probably the loudest and most persistent talk I've ever heard of nominating someone for a voice-acting performance; Scarlett Johansson's friendly and often sensual performance as the operating system Joaquin Phoenix's character falls for in Spike Jonze's trippy and borderline disturbing dramedy her didn't end up getting any Oscar love, but maybe (just maybe) my oft-repeated declaration that there should be Oscars for voice-acting might yet come to pass? Anyway, I hope this article provides some insight into which films this year truly deserve to be in the race, and that my upcoming reviews might lead you to a few movies you might otherwise have overlooked.

The Films of 2013, as I've Seen Them

Full disclaimer: There are still a fair number of Oscar-nominated films for 2013 that I have not yet seen, and the ones I have seen that were not nominated are comparable in number to those that were (if that). That said, I have seen MOST of my personal MUST list, and quite an assortment of the others. As such, this section will be a brief rundown of the films I've seen that were theoretically eligible for Oscar consideration, along with notes on whether I feel they were appropriately nominated or not. First, a couple additional notes. One: I am eternally feeling out of the loop when it comes to short films, and I'm not even sure if the ONE I saw this year (Pixar's endearing The Blue Umbrella) is truly an animated short, or if it counts as live-action. It was excellent, however, and I consider its exclusion from the race to be a snub. Two: I complain every year about the convoluted, exclusionary, and just plain stupid Oscar rules and prejudices concerning music. I will say more on this as I discuss individual movies, but for now I'd just like to make a couple disclaimers concerning my choices for the two existing categories. It is hard for someone outside the business to be aware which songs and scores are "substantively original," and there seems to be little consistency within these branches. To wit, only ONE song from Frozen even made the official Oscar list of eligible songs. I'm sorry, weren't ALL of those songs original? Not only that, the movie's a freakin' musical clearly crafted in large part around the musical numbers. And, to add insult to injury, the Golden-Globe-nominated song from Inside Llewyn Davis, "Please Mr. Kennedy," was ALSO deemed ineligible. Not since Soundgarden's baffling snub for The Avengers have I been so confused. Oh, wait, that was last year! Wake up Oscar! Anyway, I have elected to include any (and ALL) songs that I THINK are original from the films I've seen this year, as well as any (and ALL) scores for films that had them (per IMDb). Incidentally, "Alone Yet Not Alone" IS a lovely song that might have deserved credit--too bad its author broke the rules; I will not mention it further, however, since I have not seen the movie. At any rate, here is this year's movie list, starting with my number one--her--and going on down to the least impressive film I saw this year--Dark Skies.

1. her--Fully deserves its nods for Best Picture, Original Screenplay (Spike Jonze) and Original Score (Will Butler and Owen Pallett); arguably deserves its nods for Original Song ("Moon Song" by Karen O and Spike Jonze) and Production Design (K.K. Barrett and Gene Serdena). A shocking (and near-criminal) snubee for Best Actor (Joaquin Phoenix, though his snub might admittedly be due to his open loathing of the awards race), Best Supporting Actress (Amy Adams was better here than in her nominated turn for American Hustle) and Best Director (Spike Jonze, justly nominated for his brilliant Being John Malkovich but long overdue for a win); also, arguably snubbed for Film Editing, and a case could be made for Sound Mixing, Sound Effects Editing, Makeup, Costume Design and Cinematography. An excellent argument for three of the Oscars I'd like to see in future races: in Scarlett Johansson, a brilliant argument for best Vocal Performance-Female; also, Kristen Wiig's hilarious vocal cameo is an argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Female; and the film would be a solid contender for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

2. American Hustle--Fully deserves its nods for Best Picture, Best Director (David O. Russell), Best Actress (Amy Adams), Best Supporting Actor (Bradley Cooper), Best Supporting Actress (Jennifer Lawrence, though her relatively minor amount of screentime is an argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Female), Original Screenplay (Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell), Best Production Design (Judy Becker and Heather Loeffler) and Best Costume Design (Michael Wilkinson), and possibly deserves its nod for Best Actor (Christian Bale, though this was an unusually packed category this year, and many felt that Bale grabbed the spot left open by Tom Hanks, Joaquin Phoenix or Robert Redford); arguably deserves its nod for Film Editing (Jay Cassidy, Crispin Struthers and Alan Baumgarten). Though its acting deck is already stacked, I'd say Jeremy Renner got somewhat snubbed in the Best Supporting Actor category, and Louis C.K. also was worthy of consideration; the film also was indisputably snubbed for Best Makeup, and a case could be made for Sound Mixing, Sound Effects Editing and Cinematography. The brief and fun (uncredited) appearance by Robert DeNiro is a solid case for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Male, and this film is one of the strongest cases in a year of strong cases for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

3. Inside Llewyn Davis--Fully deserves its two (!?!?!??!!?) nominations, for Best Cinematography (Bruno Delbonnel) and Best Sound Mixing (Skip Lievsay, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland). Definitely and criminally snubbed for Best Picture (especially seeing as how there was room for one more), Best Director (Joel Coen and Ethan Coen) and Original Screenplay (Joel Coen and Ethan Coen). Also, I've already noted the baffling omission of "Please Mr. Kennedy" from the list of eligible songs for the Original Song category; this is clear snub on multiple levels. The film is also arguably snubbed for Best Actor (Oscar Isaac), Best Supporting Actress (Carey Mulligan), Film Editing and Production Design, and a case could be made for Costume Design and Sound Effects Editing. Finally, the film contains several excellent arguments for new categories: there are several candidates for Bit Player/ Cameo categories, most notably John Goodman (who is CRIMINALLY overdue for an Oscar nod) and Justin Timberlake for Bit Player/ Cameo--Male; this film (like nearly every film by the Brothers Coen) is a HUGE argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation; and surely the film merits some sort of Oscar mention for the REAL star of the movie, Ulysses the Cat (I kid, but only slightly).

4. Gravity--Fully deserves its nods for Best Picture, Best Director (Alfonso Cuarón), Best Actress (Sandra Bullock, who I'm finally admitting can act), Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki), Film Editing (Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger), Sound Mixing (Skip Lievsay, Niv Adiri, Christopher Benstead and Chris Munro), Sound Effects Editing (Glenn Freemantle) and Visual Effects (Timothy Webber, Chris Lawrence, David Shirk and Neil Corbould); probably deserves its nod for Original Score (Steven Price) and arguably the one for Production Design (Andy Nicholson, Rosie Goodwin and Joanne Wollard). Not definitively snubbed in any category, but a case could be made for Original Screenplay (Alfonso Cuarón and Jonás Cuarón), Costume Design and Makeup. Also, George Clooney's role is small enough that it might be a minor case for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Male, but the overall run-time of the movie is so short that I'd say his role might be closer to Supporting Actor (in which case he does not merit consideration for this particular film).

5. 12 Years a Slave--Fully deserves its nods for Best Picture, Best Actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor), Best Supporting Actor (Michael Fassbender), Best Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong'o), Adapted Screenplay (John Ridley) and Costume Design (Patricia Norris); likely deserves its nods for Best Director (Steve McQueen) and Film Editing (Joe Walker), and arguably deserves it nod for Production Design (Adam Stockhausen and Alice Baker). The film was snubbed for Best Makeup, and one could argue that it was snubbed for Cinematography; a case could be made as well for Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Some of the supporting players might be minor arguments for Best Bit Player/ Cameo, notably Benedict Cumberbatch and Paul Giamatti, and the film is a minor argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

6. Frozen--Fully deserves its two (!?!?) nominations, Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song ("Let It Go"). The film is likely snubbed in the Best Picture, Adapted Screenplay and Sound Mixing categories, and indisputably so in the Production Design category; a case could be made as well in the Original Score, Film Editing and Sound Effects Editing categories. I've also already noted the BAFFLING exclusion of most of the songs from contention in the Original Song category, of which "Love Is an Open Door" is a clear snub and "For the First Time in Forever" may be a snub. This film is also chock full of reasons for new categories. Kristin Bell and Idina Menzel were both solid arguments for Best Vocal Performance--Female, while Josh Gad, Santino Fontana and Josh Groff were minor arguments for the male counterpart; as with most Disney films, this was also a hearty argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

7. Dallas Buyers Club--Fully deserves its nods for Best Actor (Matthew McConaughey, whose ability to act the film community has finally noticed), Best Supporting Actor (Jared Leto, hot off a wild year fronting 30 Seconds to Mars with one hell of a comeback to acting) and Makeup (Adruitha Lee and Robin Mathews); likely deserves its nod for Best Picture, and arguably so for Original Screenplay (Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack) and Film Editing (Jean-Marc Valée and Martin Pensa). A case could be made for the film being snubbed for Best Director (Jean-Marc Valée), Production Design and Costume Design. Jennifer Garner currently makes my list for Best Supporting Actress due primarily to a shocking dearth of options from the films I've seen--her performance was solid but only arguably of Oscar caliber. The film also is a minor argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

8. The Wolf of Wall Street--Fully deserves its nod for Best Adapted Screenplay (Terence Winter), and arguably so its nods for Best Actor (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Best Director (Martin Scorsese). However, though the film currently makes my Top 10 list for the year, I do not feel it fully deserves a Best Picture nod at the Oscars; also, though Jonah Hill's work is solid, I do not feel he fully deserves a Best Supporting Actor nod for this film. The film was likely snubbed for Best Cinematography, and clearly so for Film Editing; a case could also be made for Production Design, Costume Design, Makeup, Visual Effects, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Further, a large number of cameos were present; Matthew McConaughey's buzzed-about appearance is one of the year's strongest arguments for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Male, and Rob Reiner's is also worth a mention. Finally, almost by definition (this being a Martin Scorsese movie) the soundtrack is a HUGE argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

9. Wrong--This is a highly debatable inclusion on my list, as it may not qualify for the Oscars by any bending of the rules. However, it is essentially a 2013 release that DID have a theatrical run stateside, and it is just so... unique... that it merits mention. It currently makes my Top 10 list for the year, though I do not feel it merits Best Picture consideration. However, the film does arguably merit consideration for Best Original Screenplay, and a case could be made for Film Editing. Also, William Fichtner's amusing role as self-help shill Master Chang is a fine argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Male.

10. Iron Man 3--Fully deserves its one nomination, for Visual Effects (Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Erik Nash and Daniel Sudick). Possibly snubbed for Best Adapted Screenplay, and a case could be made for Production Design, Costume Design, Makeup, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Just makes my current Top 10 for Best Picture, but I don't think it merits the nomination in that category.

11. Star Trek Into Darkness--Fully deserves its one nomination, for Visual Effects (Roger Guyett, Pat Tubach, Ben Grossman and Burt Dalton). Definitely snubbed for Best Sound Effects Editing, possibly so for Sound Mixing, and a case could be made for Cinematography, Production Design, Costume Design and Makeup. Bruce Greenwood makes a fair argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Male.

12. Despicable Me 2--Fully deserves its nod for Best Animated Feature; I disagree with its nod for Best Original Song ("Happy" by Pharrell Williams), though it is a fun song that is my fourth-highest song the Academy actually considered this year. A possible snub in Best Adapted Screenplay category; one could make a case as well for Production Design, Film Editing, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Benjamin Bratt and Russell Brand are solid arguments for Best Vocal Performance--Male, as is--arguably--Pierre Coffin, and Kristen Wiig and Miranda Cosgrove are good arguments for the female counterpart. Finally, this film is a good argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

13. Kick-Ass 2--This film has no Oscar nominations. A case could be made for nominations for Costume Design, Makeup, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Also, the film is a fair argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation. Chloë Grace Moretz currently makes my Top 5 for Best Actress, but though her performance is solid, it falls short of being Oscar-worthy.

14. Monsters University--This film--somewhat surprisingly--has no Oscar nominations. Likely snubbed for Best Original Score (Randy Newman), a case could also be made for Best Production Design, Sound Mixing, Sound Effects Editing and Film Editing. This film is a solid argument for the inclusion of Vocal Performance categories, with Billy Crystal, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi being arguably the strongest Male contenders and Helen Mirren a powerful Female contender. However, though the film currently is number three on my (excessively short) list for Best Animated Feature, I do not feel that it was particularly snubbed in that category.

15. Cutie and the Boxer--Likely deserves its one nomination, for Best Documentary Feature. Also, arguably snubbed for Best Original Score (Yasuaki Shimizu).

16. The Great Gatsby--Fully deserves its two Oscar nominations, for Production Design (Catherine Martin and Beverley Dunn) and Costume Design (Catherine Martin). Could be considered a snub in the Original Song category for Fergie's "A Little Party Never Killed Nobody (All We Got)"; a case could also be made for Best Cinematography, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Finally, this film (like most films by Baz Luhrmann) is a fair argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

16. Warm Bodies--No Oscar nominations. This was a good movie, but didn't quite hit Oscar level in any one category. However, John Malkovich's creepy role might make a decent argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo.

17. The Wolverine--No Oscar nominations. Possibly snubbed for Best Makeup and Best Sound Effects Editing, and rather likely snubbed for Visual Effects; a case could also be made for Production Design, Costume Design and Sound Editing.

18. War Witch--2013 Oscar contender for Best Foreign Language Feature (Canada); no nominations this year. The utterly screwed-up Oscar rules for foreign submissions allow films to be nominated in this category with no American debut in sight. I'm actually not certain this one has even had an L.A. theatrical run yet, though it apparently had an official limited release in New York City. Either way, it didn't strike me as hitting Oscar quality in most categories (though it came close); Rachel Mwanza currently makes the cut for Best Actress, and though it is a solid performance she makes the cut purely through lack of solid contenders.

19. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone--No Oscar nominations. A case could be made for Best Costume Design, Makeup, Sound Mixing, Sound Effects Editing and, particularly, Visual Effects; the film was unquestionably snubbed in Original Score for Lyle Workman's great music. Also, this film is a modest argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

20. And Now a Word from Our Sponsor--No Oscar nominations. However, one could argue this film having been snubbed for Best Original Screenplay.

21. Gangster Squad--No Oscar nominations. One could make a case for Best Costume Design and Makeup.

22. Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa--Shockingly, not only is this an Oscar nominee, but it actually deserves to be nominated for Best Makeup (Steve Prouty). What's more, this may be the funniest film I've seen this year.

23. Oz the Great and Powerful--No Oscar nominations. Arguably snubbed for Best Cinematography and Visual Effects, and almost definitely so for Production Design and Costume Design, a case could also be made for Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing.

24. Identity Thief--No Oscar nominations. This was a decently-made movie, but not quite worthy of Oscar consideration to any degree.

25. Casting Couch--No Oscar nominations. This movie barely rates mention for ANY of the awards races, either good or bad. It just... kinda sits there.

26. Dark Skies--No Oscar nominations. This bland, uninteresting movie isn't BAD--I can't nominate it for any Golden Raspberry Awards, but neither is it good. Even more so than Casting Couch, it just kinda sits there.

So, there you have it--my current list of (arguably) Oscar-eligible films for the past year. I hope you find some helpful viewing advice; as always, I certainly welcome advice on those I still need to see before the show (or after). As mentioned before, this is the first in a series of articles; the upcoming ones will be reviews based on one to a few Oscar-nominated films. I do hope you'll check back, and in the meantime, happy viewing!

Author's Update

Since making the above list of this year's films and their Oscar nominations, as I see them, I have been fortunate enough to see an additional twelve 2013 releases. As such, I would like to make the following additions to the above list:

1. Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises)--Enters the list between her and American Hustle. Indisputably deserves its one (!?!?!?!?!?!?) nod, for Best Animated Feature. If there is any justice in this world, it will win. Definitely and criminally snubbed for Best Picture; clearly snubbed as well for Production Design and for Joe Hisaishi's incredible Original Score. Arguably snubbed for Best Director and Adapted Screenplay (both Hayao Miyazaki), though since I saw the English dub I can only approximate these ratings; similarly, I cannot comment on this as a foreign language film, but I suspect that it will top my list once I see the original Japanese dub. Very likely snubbed for Best Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing, and a case could be made for Film Editing. The English dub was solid, but largely unexceptional despite the incredible cast; that said, Martin Short was a solid argument for Best Vocal Performance--Male, and John Krasinski and William H. Macy also warrant a mention; Emily Blunt certainly would be a fine argument for Vocal Performance--Female. Also, all Studio Ghibli films are solid arguments for Best Soundtrack Compilation, this one more than many.

2. Blue Jasmine--Enters the list between Inside Llewyn Davis and Gravity. Fully deserves its nominations for Best Actress (Cate Blanchett) and Original Screenplay (Woody Allen); arguably deserves its nomination for Best Supporting Actress (Sally Hawkins). Indisputably snubbed for Best Picture, arguably so for Best Director (Woody Allen), and a case could be made for Best Supporting Actor (Bobby Cannavale), Cinematography, Production Design, Costume Design, Sound Mixing, Sound Effects Editing and Film Editing. Several of the characters appear only briefly, meaning some potential arguments for Best Bit Player/ Cameo; Louis C.K. and Peter Sarsgaard make rather strong arguments here. Also, ALL Woody Allen films are EXCELLENT arguments for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

3. Philomena--Enters the list between 12 Years a Slave and Frozen. Indisputably deserves its nods for Best Actress (Judi Dench) and Original Score (Alexandre Desplat), probably deserves its nods for Best Picture and Adapted Screenplay (Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope). The film had no definite snubs, but could be considered a minor snub for Best Director (Stephen Frears) and Best Actor (Steve Coogan); a case could also be made for Production Design, Film Editing, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Though her role was rather too limited for a Supporting Actress nod, Sophie Kennedy Clark made a powerful argument for Best Bit Role/ Cameo--Female, and Charlie Murphy (no, not THAT Charlie Murphy) also made a fair case.

4. Captain Phillips--Enters the list between Frozen and Dallas Buyers Club. To my tin ear, clearly deserves its nod for Best Sound Effects Editing (Oliver Tarney); likely deserves its nods for Best Picture and Adapted Screenplay (Billy Ray), arguably so for Best Supporting Actor (Barkhad Abdi) and Sound Mixing (Chris Burdon, Mark Taylor, Mike Priestwood Smith and Chris Munro), and a case could be made for Film Editing (Christopher Rouse). Ironically, the nomination likely most deserved by this film is one that eluded it--the lack of a Best Actor nod for Tom Hanks was a clear and, frankly, baffling snub. Paul Greengrass was also arguably snubbed for Best Director, and one could also readily argue a snub for Makeup; a case could be made for Production Design.

5. La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty)--Enters the list between The Wolf of Wall Street and Saving Mr. Banks. Fully deserves its one nomination, for Best Foreign Language Feature. Pretty definitely snubbed for Best Cinematography and for Lele Marchitelli's lovely Original Score, arguably so for Best Director (Paolo Sorrentino), Actor (Toni Servillo), Supporting Actor (Carlo Verdone) and Production Design; a case could also be made for Costume Design, Film Editing, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. In her very brief role, Galatea Ranzi gives a powerful argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Female, and the incredible music of the film is a POWERFUL argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

6. Saving Mr. Banks--Enters the list between The Great Beauty and The Grandmaster. Arguably deserves its one nomination, Original Score for Thomas Newman's whimsical music. However, given that the score prominently sampled music from the original Mary Poppins, I am once again left scratching my head at what monkeys must be pre-screening music to determine Oscar eligibility. Emma Thompson was very likely snubbed in the Best Actress category, and Tom Hanks was a minor snub in the Supporting Actor race. Also arguably snubbed for Best Original Screenplay and Film Editing, and a case could be made for Production Design, Costume Design, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing.

7.Yi Dai Zong Shi (The Grandmaster)--Enters the list between Saving Mr. Banks and Wrong. In a perfect world, this film would win the race for Best Cinematography (Philippe Le Sourd); also definitely deserves its nod for Costume Design (William Chang). Likely snubbed for Best Production Design; arguably a minor snub for Best Director (Kar Wai Wong), Actor (Tony Chiu Wai Leung) and Original Score (Nathaniel Méchaly and Shigeru Umebayashi). Seems to be a clear snub for Best Foreign Language Feature; a case could also be made for Best Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing.

8. The Croods--Enters the list between Despicable Me 2 and August: Osage County. Fully deserves its one nomination, for Best Animated Feature. Likely snubbed for Best Original Screenplay (Chris Sanders and Kirk De Micco) and for Original Song (the jaunty Owl City number "Shine Your Way"), arguably so for Alan Silvestri's Original Score; a case could also be made for Best Production Design, Film Editing, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. This film is a powerful argument for Best Vocal Acting categories, with Emma Stone a lock for the female one (and Catherine Keener and Cloris Leachman also contenders), and Ryan Reynolds and Nicolas Cage fair arguments for the male category. Also, this film is an argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

9. August: Osage County--Enters the list between The Croods and Kick-Ass 2. Arguably deserves its nomination for Best Actress (Meryl Streep), very much so for Supporting Actress (Julia Roberts). Arguably snubbed for Best Supporting Actor (Chris Cooper), Adapted Screenplay (Tracy Letts) and Original Song (Kings of Leon's "Last Mile Home"); a case could be made for Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Some of the roles were short enough to be arguments for Best Bit Player/ Cameo; Sam Shepard would indisputably be a strong case here, and one could argue Benedict Cumberbatch, Abigail Breslin and, maybe, Chris Cooper and Ewan MacGregor (the latter two may have enough screentime for Supporting--it's a close call). Also, this film is a strong argument for Best Soundtrack Compilation.

10. Thor: The Dark World--Enters the list between The Great Gatsby and Warm Bodies. No Oscar nominations. Likely snubbed for Best Visual Effects; one could make a case as well for Best Cinematography, Production Design, Costume Design, Makeup, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. Anthony Hopkins makes a solid argument for Best Bit Player/ Cameo--Male, and Rene Russo makes a fair argument for the Female complement.

11. All Is Lost--Enters the list between Thor: The Dark World and Warm Bodies. Even my tin ear suspects that one cannot dispute this film's one nomination--Best Sound Effects Editing (Steve Boeddeker and Richard Hymns). The much-ballyhooed performance by the great Robert Redford was, indeed, a possible snub in the Best Actor race; the film was also arguably snubbed for Best Cinematography, Makeup, and likely so for Sound Mixing.

12. The Lone Ranger--Enters the list between Gangster Squad and Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa. Possibly deserves its nomination for Best Makeup (Joel Harlow and Gloria Pasqua Casny), arguably so for Visual Effects (Tim Alexander, Gary Brozenich, Edson Williams and John Frazier). One could make a case for the film being snubbed for Best Cinematography, Production Design, Costume Design, Sound Mixing and Sound Effects Editing. This is, I believe, the first film I've seen out of this year's crop of Golden Raspberry Award nominees; I've actually seen enough to know that the film does not deserve to be "honored" for Worst Picture, Director (Gore Verbinski), Actor (Johnny Depp) or Screenplay (even my limited viewing places the movie out of the bottom five in each of these categories), and it's possible that the film does not deserve the nomination for Worst Remake, Rip-off or Sequel, but it does make the cut currently. I will note, though, that I have yet to make any notes this year of a film that truly deserves Razzie consideration.

So, there you have it folks--my updated list of films for 2013. I intend to knock out several more before Sunday's show, though I'm afraid that may mean no reviews before then. I do apologize for falling short of my goals here, but hopefully I've still given you some insights into the movies to watch from 2013. Happy viewing.

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    • Luke Ellis profile image

      Luke Ellis 3 years ago from Nottingham, England

      Really interesting read. I was also disapointed that Inside Llewyn Davis was ineligible for 'Please Mr Kennedy'. To say you only watched a handful of movies from the past year, you picked pretty well.

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