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Sheriff Woody: A Toys Best Friend

Updated on August 9, 2019
Ryan Cornelius profile image

Ryan is a poet, article writer, screen writer, copywriter, and song writer.

Introduction

It is ok to be serious in life but remember your role off screen. Movie stars are serious about the roles they play. An example is actor Danny Glover. He played the role of mister so well on the film the color purple (1985) fans thought he was really like that. As a response they hated him. Overtime, he cleared that up and assured them it was all acting. A an actress example is an actress playing a single woman without kids on screen. In real life, she has kids. In addition, she is married. She may love to but she cannot take her role off the screen. Actors/Actresses must live out their purpose off screen not their fantasy. Since some know that they have discouraging times. During those times, they need a friend to uplift them. Similar events have occurred during the Toy Story franchise. They are serious at being there for Andy but also serious about being there for others. Their purpose is to please children. There are also discouraged toys. Toys that took their roles too serious and when they found out the truth they were let down. The one that will normally uplift them is always Sheriff Woody (Tom Hanks). He lifted the discouraged Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen), Jesse (Joan Cusak) of the round up gang and himself.

Buzz Lightyear

When Buzz came to the gang he thought he was a real space ranger. He thought that his box was a ship. He felt the ship crash landed there and it needed repairs. As a response, he tried fixing it. At this point each feature that came with him was a real one to him. To make matters worse, was the new favorite toy. A new toy that all loved. The bad thing here is that he took his role too serious. The Sheriff begin sarcastically reminding him that he is just a toy but Buzz was hesitant to believe it. The others saw jealousy and envy. Soon after, it looked more obvious that he had an issue. They really lose it when Buzz falls out of the window by accident into Sid's yard. To them, Sid is the kid that experiments on toys. The others think that it was no accident and blame it all on him. Instead of spending much time convincing that he did not, he felt obligated to rescue Buzz. As he develops a strategy to do so, the truth that was ignored at first was revealed. As a response, he is discouraged. That goes on for sometime until the Sheriff comes along and talks him out of it. In the end, the toys are happily ever after. They are living their purpose with their owner Andy.

Jesse

The Sheriff's role was taken serious. It is obvious in all of the films but they also kept it fun. This time he is tested outside of his normal family. He is taken and found that he is a key part of a collection called the round up gang. He actually was the missing piece that was needed. The gang was to be sold to a museum in Japan. Once he became aware of the plan he made it clear that he could not go. He could not because of his owner Andy. Upon hearing that he hears the story of them all but the one told by Jesse stands out the most. She revealed that she was loyal to hers and thrown out. Jesse was excited for the opportunity to be seen by kids again. It was clear that she was upset. She knew that the Sheriff was not going and she felt that he wasting time being loyal to them. Because of him not agreeing to go, she became discouraged. At that point, she needed to be uplifted and he was there for it. He later convinced he that she is made to be a toy. He told her to come with him to Andy. After a lengthy battle, she answered. Jesse was in the care of another child and The Sheriff had a lot to do with that.

Himself

Andy is all grown up. The toys he wants stored away in the Attic. In this installment the Sheriff found it hard to change. He needed someone to lift him up. He did not share it but he needed it. Mistakenly, they were almost thrown away. Most of the others realized that it was time for change but he refused to do so. He went with them to Sunny side daycare. There, he was introduced to a new set of toys. Soon after he made the decision to go back to Andy. After a while, he accepted that the change was going to happen so he faced it. He just wanted to be sure that his purpose was not forgotten. So he wrote a note to Andy and convinced him to help the toys live out their purpose to always be there for kids pleasure. Formally discouraged new toys were added to the gang as well. In the end. The Sheriff needed his own spirits lifted so that he could continue to lift the others that need him.

Conclusion

One of the many things I admire about this franchise is how they made sure that Sheriff Wood was rarely discouraged. He was always confident and upbeat. In the first film he was confident that he will save Buzz. In the midst he encouraged the battered toys in Sid's care along to be who they are. In the second he did the same to the round up gang. In the last he wanted to continue the legacy. So he encouraged himself. I am sure in Toy Story four he is doing the same. His role was always ready for the challenge ahead of him. He faced them all head on. Sadly, not all he convinced. Some just wanted to remain bad. For example, Stinky Pete the Prospector (Kelsey Grammer). Like Jesse, he tried convincing him to come along in Toy Story 2. The attempt was not a failure because he tried. Another example is Lotso Huggin Bear (Ned Beatty). The results were the same. Discouragement hits us all. Keep someone around that will always lift you up.Tom Hanks may leave from being the voice as the toy one day but they have already build his legacy and the world loves it.

© 2019 Ryan Jarvis Cornelius

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