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Disney Songs in Different Languages

Updated on July 22, 2015
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Disney is one of the biggest entertainment industries in the world, and many of their movies have been translated into countless languages. For example, 'Let it Go' from Frozen has been translated into 42 languages and dialects worldwide. Languages such as French, German, Japanese and Spanish are popular for many classic Disney songs. Here's a list of songs from various animated classics that sound just as good, if not better than the original English versions.

Be Prepared (The Lion King) - German

Jeremy Irons and Jim Cummings sang the original version of 'Be Prepared'; Jeremy Irons' voice gave out after the line 'you won't get a sniff without me!' / 'kein Kr├╝melchen gibts ohne mich!' (2:10 on the video), and Jim Cummings took over.

The German version of this song, "Seid Bereit", is just as good, if not better, than Irons and Cummings'. It sounds deadly, scary and the vocalist does a great job of acting out Scar's evil intentions.

I Won't Say (Hercules) - French

They say that French is the language of love. Many people fell in love with Meg's character upon the release of Hercules in 1997, and her song about not wanting to admit she's in love with the hero is a popular tune that many girls (and even women) feel that they can relate to. The French version of this song seems to match Meg's sassy personality perfectly, and the vocalist has an undeniably beautiful voice. Have a listen.

A Whole New World (Aladdin) - Japanese

'A Whole New World' is an insanely popular Disney song in Japan, and it's easy to see why. Both Aladdin and Jasmine's actors have pleasant voices, making it a great duet.

There's something extremely sweet about the Japanese version - it's less corny than the English, but still with the romance.

Hellfire (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) - Norwegian

Norwegian is a gorgeous language with the toughness of German and also the linguistics of romantic languages. They mix to make an excellent version of one of the coolest (and most underrated) Disney songs ever - Hellfire. Frollo is agonising over his obsession with Esmeralda, a gypsy girl, and sings about either taking her for himself, or burning her for being a witch. A deliciously twisted and evil song that is doubly great in Norwegian.

When Will My Life Begin? (Tangled) - Mandarin Chinese

'When Will My Life Begin' is an upbeat, modern-sounding tune with a very dark underlying meaning - Rapunzel is stuck in her tower, and carries out different activities to pass her endless time until she can finally leave her prison and experience a free life. The soft, pleasant voice of the Chinese actress delivers the song very well, and also portrays one of the cutest Disney girls ever.

Savages (Pocahontas) - German

Another great German version of a dark but catchy song by Disney - "Savages", featured in Pocahontas, when the English and the native Americans decide to go to war, much to the dismay of Pocahontas herself and her lover, John Smith. It's a beautiful movie with some moving lyrics and great animation. This pre-war song, featuring many talented singers, sounds fantastic in German. Give it a listen.

One Jump Ahead (Aladdin) - Spanish

Another song from Aladdin is 'One Jump Ahead', which Aladdin sings when he's escaping the guards after snatching a loaf of bread. This version in Spanish, and sounds even more fun, carefree and cheeky than the English original.

Aladdin sounds great in other languages, but it's doubtful that there are any versions that can beat Robin Williams as the Genie.

Belle (Beauty and the Beast) - Swedish

More of our scandinavian cousins blew a Disney song out of the water - this time it's "Belle" (the first song with vocals in the film) featured in one of the most critically acclaimed Disney movies of all time, Beauty and the Beast. Belle sings about her boredom in the tiny town where she and her father live, and how she'd like a big adventure one day. The Swedish vocalist has a lovely voice, and the song is delivered very well.

If you love 'Let it Go' from the 2013 production Frozen, check out the video below, where the song is performed in full sequence in 25 different languages. It's extremely well-edited, and shows how many countries wanted to participate in the production of the movie.

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    • poppyr profile image
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      Poppy Reid 2 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      I'm so excited for you to read it! :D

    • Randall Guinn profile image

      Randall Guinn 2 years ago from Pinellas Park, Florida

      I didn't know about CreateSpace. I will have to check it out. I ordered your book last week, but they just shipped it today. I can't wait to read it.

    • poppyr profile image
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      Poppy Reid 2 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      Randall! Hi! I changed from Lulu to CreateSpace because Lulu's version of my paperback was messed up. Thank you so much for buying it, and I hope you enjoy it!

    • Sarah Anderson profile image

      Sarah Anderson 2 years ago from Wallingford, CT

      Awesome! I've seen a lot of the Japanese ones, particularly One Jump and I Won't Say.

    • Randall Guinn profile image

      Randall Guinn 2 years ago from Pinellas Park, Florida

      Does it look funny when the motion of their mouths do not correspond to the words? I have seen foreign films where the language has been changed to English, and it looks a little funny, or do they re-edit the the art work to make it match somehow? By the way, i ordered your book last week. I had been looking for it on LuLu, but it never became available, and then I found it on Amazon. I will get it this Saturday. You did tell me it would be for sale on lulu didn't you, or has my old age played a trick on me again?

      Anyway, another nice hub Poppy. I always try to read everything that my co-follwers produce, unless it's too girly.