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Rock Guitar Lessons • Dust In The Wind Guitar Lesson • Kansas • Fingerpicking, Violin Solo, Chords, Tab, Video, Lyrics.

Updated on April 14, 2016
Review of the book.  Starts at the beginning and breaks the blues down in a well articulated way. It exponentially grows from there. Doesn't keep it safe but goes for that blues-jazzy feel throughout. Not your average blues book.  By Karen
Review of the book. Starts at the beginning and breaks the blues down in a well articulated way. It exponentially grows from there. Doesn't keep it safe but goes for that blues-jazzy feel throughout. Not your average blues book. By Karen | Source

Learning Blues Guitar

I have been teaching guitar professionally since 1992, when Don’t Fret Guitar Instruction was established. Over the years, I have taught countless students (beginners to advanced) how to play or improve their chops. Past students include four members of PROTEST THE HERO.

With this book, my goal is to relate the scales with chords and rhythms as opposed to just learning solos or licks and having no idea how to apply them. Good rhythm playing and knowledge is crucial to good soloing and vice versa. This comes through understanding the relationship between chords and scales. This book provides that important foundation.

The book is unique in the fact that each chapter is based around a different key signature and an open (contains unfretted notes), pattern of the pentatonic scale. There are five chapters covering the key signatures of E, A, D, G and C, and the five open ‘box patterns’ (scale patterns) of the pentatonic scale. Eventually all the box patterns are covered, from the open strings to the fifteenth fret.

There is no endless scale practice or useless licks to learn. Instead, each chapter begins with a chord progression, moves into various rhythm patterns derived from the chord progression, and then culminates with solos based on the scale and key covered. These solos tie in with the chord progression and rhythm patterns to form a complete lesson for each chapter.

The book is progressive. Upon completion, the student will have a solid foundation in blues guitar, and will understand the rhythm, lead connection.

The book is best studied from beginning to end, without slighting any material. All theory is explained in the simplest terms. There are fretboard diagrams for the scales, chord grids, and photos of hand positions as well as videos posted on YouTube to aid in the learning process.

It is best, but not necessary, to have a knowledge of barre and open chord shapes before beginning this course. All the chords have fretboard grids associated with them.

Good luck and have fun. Music is a celebration. Enjoy!

Lorne K. Hemmerling

Introduction

Dave Hope (bass), Phil Ehart (drums, percussion), and Kerry Livgren (guitars, keyboards, synthesizers) formed a progressive rock group in 1970 in their hometown of Topeka, Kansas, along with vocalists Lynn Meredith and Joel Warne, and keyboardist Don Montre, keyboardist Dan Wright, and saxophonist Larry Baker. The band went through some lineup changes (even forming two versions of Kansas, at one point), Ehart was replaced by Zeke Lowe and later Brad Schulz, Hope was replaced by Rod Mikinski on bass, and Baker was replaced by John Bolton on saxophone and flute.


Leftoverture (their fourth album) was a major breakthrough for the band, hitting number 5 on Billboard's pop album chart. Point of Know Return peaked even higher, at number 4. Leftoverture and Point each sold over four million copies in the U.S. Both 'Carry On Wayward Son' and 'Dust in the Wind'. 'Dust in the Wind' was certified gold as a digital download by the RIAA in 2005, almost 30 years after selling one million copies as a single. Leftoverture was eventually certified five times platinum by the RIAA in 2001. To say that the band achieved phenomenal success is an understatement. They continue to tour today, to sold out crowds.

Leftoverture
Leftoverture

This remastered CD is astounding in its clarity.

In my review of Masque, I revealed I'm a prog-rock nut; love the stuff. And this is a perfect example of why that type of music appeals to me so much. Interestingly, as I was listening to Masque at the office with my headphones on (which, if you read my other reviews, is where and how I tend to do most of my listening), a co-worker stopped by to drop off a project. I asked him (a fellow music freak) what he thought of Kansas. He said "I really liked in them in my day." He also said he understands why I like them: they blend the elements of progressive rock I like with good, old-fashioned Midwest rock.

 

The Song

'Dust In the Wind' is a beautifully written composition. Strong chord progression, melody and lyrics, they must have known it was a hit song form the first playback. It is a staple in music stores, almost as popular to play as 'Stairway To Heaven'. The fingerpicking is a strict common pattern, but quite difficult to play at the recorded tempo. I recommend starting slow, making sure all notes are clean, then gradually increase the tempo. In fact, this is the way to approach learning any song. If you can't play it slow, you can't play it fast! The tempo is around 96 bpm, but the mixture of eights and sixteenths are still hard to execute at this speed.

The Intro

The chord progression is beautiful. The intro is based around two chords, C Major and A minor. Am is the relative minor to C Major, they share the same key signature (no sharps or flats). The song is diatonic, meaning it is contained in one key: C Major. During the intro, the bass notes of the cords remain static, while the upper melody notes change. The fingerpicking pattern has the common form of the bass notes (played with the thumb), maintaining (in this case) a strict eighth note pattern (1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and). This is sometimes referred to as an 'educated thumb'. It is the index and middle finger that add the syncopated spice to the sound. This pattern continues throughout the song. I have notated the pattern in the first measure: T (thumb) I (index) M (middle). It will take some time to get the pattern 'rolling', that is where is sounds smooth, but diligence will pay off!

Intro

Dust In The Wind Intro

The Verses

The upper notes of the chords, follow the vocal melody line, a really nice sound. This section is a little more difficult to play, as the fingerpicking no longer concentrated in the middle four strings for the most part. The G Major shape, is simply the third finger on the sixth string. There is no need to finger the entire chord. The Dm7 is the most difficult switch in this section, due to the fact that the pick hand is now concentrated in the top four strings. This is a tough switch from the G shape preceding it. The G/B slash chord is a nice lead in to the C Major. Use the second finger of the fret hand for the B and the fourth finger for the D. This will make the transition to the C Major much easier. Also, I have left out the embellishments, such as hammer ons and pull offs, to simplify the piece.

Verses

Dust In The Wind Verses

The Choruses

Extremely nice chordal movement in this section! The D/F sharp, can be fingered two ways: the first finger on the F sharp, the second on the A and the third on the D, or, the thumb of the fret had can be employed here to 'grab' the F sharp on the sixth string, by bringing it over the top of the neck and actually fretting the note with the thumb. This is very common, and used my many players in all genres. Jimi Hendrix employed this technique frequently, as do many country players. I prefer to use my fingers as opposed to the thumb. Whatever works though. Th e G Major is the same fingering as the verse, just the third finger. For the Am/G slash chord, use the fourth finger to pick up the low G. The bass movement is chromatic in nature: F sharp on the D Major, G on the G Major, A on the Am, G on the Am/G, back to F sharp. Great sound!

Choruses

Dust In The Wind Choruses

The Solo Progression

This is where the song changes. This progression is still diatonic to the key of C Major, but some unconventional chord shapes. All the chords are contained in the four middle strings, but can prove quite challenging to execute cleanly due to the open strings. It is very easy to mute these strings with the edges of the fret hand fingers. This is not the sound that is wanted, the strings must ring together to sound correct. Fingering for these chords is essential. For the Am9, use the third finger for the seventh fret (A) and the first finger for the fifth fret {C}. Moving to the G/A, use the first finger for the fifth fret (G) and the FOURTH finger for the seventh fret (D). Slide the fingers back two frets to form the Am9 sharp 5. That way, you can grab the D on the second string with the second finger in the second half of the measure. Kind of tricky, but it works!

Solo Progression

Dust In The Wind Solo Progression

Dust In The Wind Complete

A Aeolian

This is the A Aeolian scale in the twelfth fret position. Position is loosely defined as the fret that the first finger falls on. A Aeolian is the sixth mode of the C Major scale, also called the natural minor scale. All these notes are diatonic to (contained in) the C Major scale. Scale spelling: A B C D E F G and octave A. The scale depicted here is a two octave scale starting on A (twelfth fret, fifth string) and ending on G (fifteenth fret, first string).

A Aeolian At The Twelfth Fret

Violin Solo Arranged For Guitar

All the notes of this solo are contained in the scale above. The only note outside of the scale pattern is the high A on the seventeenth fret on the first string. This note is still in A Aeolian, just outside of this particular pattern. Playing this note will cause you to shift out of the the four fret pattern. Watch the video for finger placement.

Lyrics

Official Video

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    • mediacreeks profile image

      Media Creeks 

      2 years ago

      Thanks for explaining it in this hub.

    working

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