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How To Write Like A Spoken Word Poet

Updated on August 17, 2015
wisdom25 profile image

Maurice Bishop, a powerful, spoken word Poet currently serving in the United States Army. Published Author & Motivational Speaker.

Notebook and pen
Notebook and pen | Source
Pen and Paper
Pen and Paper | Source
Writing
Writing | Source

Introduction

Have you ever wonder how spoken word poets write interesting stories or about certain topics? Do you know how they put words together to flow very well? Do you want to write like a spoken word poet? If your answer is yes I have 3 main points that will get you writing like a spoken word poet in no time.

First Step

The first important thing you need to do is come up with a title. When you come up with a title make sure that it is a title that catches your attention. You have to ask yourself, "If I never heard of spoken word poetry and I came across this title will it catch my attention?"

Second Step

The second step is you need to write the main idea for the title you are writing about. You want to be straight forward and ask yourself the 4 W's, what, when, where, and who.

What is the main idea and what is the overall message of this poem?

When did this (example: conflict, struggle, fight, etc.,) happen and how it happen?

Where did this (example: conflict, struggle, fight, etc.,) happen?

Who started this (example: conflict, struggle, fight, etc.,) and who are you addressing?

You have the title in mind of what you want to write about and all you doing is outlining your poetry. This should make your writing a lot easier; especially when you are writing out the main ideas and key points to your poetry.

Third Step

The third step is you need to put your mind into your poetry. In other words, whatever you are writing about whether it's about your life as a homeless person, abusive relationship, or heartbreak you need to feel and act like the character that is in your poetry. When you put yourself into another mindset of that character and imagining every conflict that surrounds you you will be able to write words that you never knew that was inside you. If you are speaking about politics, history, law etc., you still need to imagine and visualize that you are speaking for someone else. The words that are delivered in spoken word poetry is powerful.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the only way to write like a spoken word poet is to keep writing. Practice makes perfect and the only way to become a great writer is to keep writing. Try to write at least 3 times day. The more you write the more creative you become. Spoken word poetry is about speaking the truth and how you feel. Know that poetry are not just words written on paper but the words on paper demand to be heard. #Poets #PoetrySlam #Poetry #Wisdom #Author #Writers #hashtags #Poem #SpokenWordPoet #Tutorial





Poetry For Dummies
Poetry For Dummies

Sometimes it seems like there are as many definitions of poetry as there are poems. Coleridge defined poetry as “the best words in the best order.” St. Augustine called it “the Devil’s wine.” For Shelley, poetry was “the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.” But no matter how you define it, poetry has exercised a hold upon the hearts and minds of people for more than five millennia. That’s because for the attentive reader, poetry has the power to send chills shooting down the spine and lightning bolts flashing in the brain — to throw open the doors of perception and hone our sensibilities to a scalpel’s edge.

Poetry For Dummies is a great guide to reading and writing poems, not only for beginners, but for anyone interested in verse. From Homer to Basho, Chaucer to Rumi, Shelley to Ginsberg, it introduces you to poetry’s greatest practitioners. It arms you with the tools you need to understand and appreciate poetry in all its forms, and to explore your own talent as a poet. Discover how to:

Understand poetic language and forms

Interpret poems

Get a handle on poetry through the ages

Find poetry readings near you

Write your own poems

Shop your work around to publishers

Don’t know the difference between an iamb and a trochee? Worry not, this friendly guide demystifies the jargon, and it covers a lot more ground besides, including:

Understanding subject, tone, narrative; and poetic language

Mastering the three steps to interpretation

Facing the challenges of older poetry

Exploring 5,000 years of verse, from Mesopotamia to the global village

Writing open-form poetry

Working with traditional forms of verse

Writing exercises for aspiring poets

Getting published

 

Molestation - Live Poetry Performance

Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry
Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry

Discover the poet within! You've read poetry that has touched your heart, and you'd like to improve your own writing technique. But even though you have loads of inspiration, you're discovering that good instruction can be as elusive as a good metaphor. The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing Poetry will help you compose powerful, emotion-packed poems that you can be proud of. You'll learn simple explanations of poetry building blocks such as metaphor, imagery, symbolism and stanzas; steps to the poetic process; easy-to-follow guidelines for writing sonnets, sestinas, narrative poems and more; fun exercises to help you master the basics of poetry writing; cliches and other poetry pitfalls to avoid; advice on writers' conferences and workshops; tips on getting your poetry published; good poems that will inspire your own work; strategies to beat writer's block.

 
A Poetry Handbook
A Poetry Handbook

With passion, wit, and good common sense, the celebrated poet Mary Oliver tells of the basic ways a poem is built-meter and rhyme, form and diction, sound and sense. Drawing on poems from Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, and others, Oliver imparts an extraordinary amount of information in a remarkably short space. “Stunning” (Los Angeles Times). Index.

 

Pre-Order "Pain Living In My Pen" January 2015

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    • bearnmom profile image

      Laura L Scotty 4 years ago from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

      All good suggestions and instructions for writing. I had to think back and decide if I used these when I did my piece.

    • Angelme566 profile image

      Angelme566 4 years ago

      Guess to some of this i am already doing..a very informative piece..! This hub i voted Up . useful..

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 4 years ago from San Tan Valley

      Thank you bearnmom and angelme for the comment. I'm glad you all found my hub to be informative. Much love and respect to you all.

    • rahul0324 profile image

      Jessee R 4 years ago from Gurgaon, India

      What wonderful advice...will surely help me...

      Thank you so much :)

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 4 years ago from San Tan Valley

      You already an awesome poet so my advice is just an icing on the cake. lol. Much Love and Respect

    • profile image

      Y Battle-Felton 4 years ago

      Great advice. I tend to start with a cause and then hope the piece will write itself, smiles. That may be why I don't write a lot of poetry.

      Spoken Word is a great opportunity to put a cause in to action and a way to bring an issue to light.

      Thanks for the tips on bringing the poem off of the page.

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 4 years ago from San Tan Valley

      I'm glad you find the tips useful. Keep trying and practice. If you have any questions feel free to ask me. Much Love and Respect.

    • Freya Cesare profile image

      Freya Cesare 4 years ago from Borneo Island, Indonesia

      Hi, Wisdom. That's really useful instruction. I'm not sure if people asked me how to write a poem, I will come up with these things you listed because I think I never really took notice before on what I did while I started to write a poem. It just flowed; the rhyme, the emotion, the story. just like that. I guess, I'm not really good on teaching job, not like you. hehehe

      Good job!

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 4 years ago from San Tan Valley

      Thank you Freya for the comment. I don't think I'm the best teacher. Lol. I just teach what I know and my experiences. I'm glad you think my hub was useful. Much love and respect

    • profile image

      Kevin Bradshaw 4 years ago

      Very imforative, but I could not find the fourth main point.

    • Bridie H profile image

      Bridget Houcek 2 years ago from Santa Clara CA

      Very impressive. A lot of great examples throughout.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 2 years ago from California

      Liked this a bunch!

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 24 months ago from San Tan Valley

      Thank you @AudreyHowitt

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 20 months ago from london

      Very solid and sound advice. Great Bro. Carry on!

    • poeticmc profile image

      MD Johnson 9 months ago from San Diego, CA

      Your work is remarkable!!! I struggle most with titles and usually come up with them as a last step, because sometimes when you write spoken word style, it just erupts or evolves as pure emotion and you never know where it will take you or what the main point will be. Your style reminds me of Talib Kweli. It's amazing!

    • wisdom25 profile image
      Author

      Maurice Wisdom Bishop 9 months ago from San Tan Valley

      Thank you Poetic MC. Really appreciate it.

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