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Jeremy Brett - the Definitive Sherlock Holmes?

Updated on April 25, 2015
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Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes
Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes | Source

One of the best things about movies and TV series, is seeing some of our favourite characters brought to the screen. Of all the actors to take on the role of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous consulting detective, there have been some interesting depictions, but how many of them have revealed the enigmatic Sherlock Holmes as his creator described him? British actor Jeremy Brett (in my opinion) did more than most to bring the great man's creation to life, and many Holmesian fans consider his to be the ultimate portrayal of the infamous sleuth.

Will the Real Sherlock Holmes Please Step Forward?

Ever since the first silent movies portrayed Arthur Conan Doyle's eminent detective, actors have clamoured to don the deerstalker and add their own mark to the character.

In the early days, Sherlock Holmes was played by such stalwarts as H A Saintsbury, Hugo Flink and William Gillette. The coming of sound to the movies also had a huge impact and a host of big-screen adaptations began to appear. However, it was the introduction of television into our living rooms that really made the biggest difference to the character's popularity. Newly-formed TV companies looked at the stories and saw the potential for TV series, and Sherlock Holmes began to pop up on our screens with increasing regularly.

Just a few of the actors who've played Sherlock Holmes. See how many you can name (answers below).
Just a few of the actors who've played Sherlock Holmes. See how many you can name (answers below).
Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Holmes and Watson
Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Holmes and Watson

Acting the part

More than a hundred actors have taken on the role of Sherlock Holmes on radio, television and stage, as well as on the big screen, including the series of 14 films featuring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Holmes and Watson which, despite Bruce's bumbling portrayal, did much to further the popularity of the stories. And while there's been much discussion about who's the best Holmes, almost as much fuss has been made over the depiction of his sidekick, Dr Watson.

Movies aside, I think it's only in the long-running TV series that actors really had the chance to get to grips with the character. Some of the most notable are worth a mention here - silent movie actor Eille Norwood, for instance, starred in no less than 48 shorts based on the original stories; Alan Wheatley (better known as the Sheriff of Nottingham in The Adventures of Robin Hood) took on the role in 1951 for six episodes.

Then there was Ronald Howard (son of matinee idol Leslie Howard) who played Holmes in Sheldon Reynolds’ American series. Douglas Wilmer also donned the deerstalker in an early BBC version, with horror film regular Peter Cushing taking over the role for the second series.

Granada Studios
Granada Studios

Great Granada

While all of these interpretations have been significant, few have come close to showing the character as Conan Doyle created him. Beginning with The Adventures of Sherlock Homes, ITV’s long-running series took the stories seriously with a view to producing versions that were nearer to the originals than most previous attempts.

In 1983, production of this new series was begun by Manchester-based company Granada (responsible for such classic serials as Family at War, Brideshead Revisited and Jewel in the Crown). A considerable amount of money was spent on creating a realistic series, with a brand new Baker Street set built at their Manchester studios near the set of long-running soap Coronation Street. Producer John Hawkesworth, who had previously worked on Upstairs Downstairs and The Duchess of Duke Street, developed the series for television and wrote many of the episodes.

Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes
Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes

Brett/Holmes

Jeremy Brett’s portrayal in ITV's 41 episodes was always very precise and thought provoking. He introduced several rather nice touches to the character, such as throwing himself on the ground to inspect a set of footprints. (This was of course a feature of Conan Doyle's original character and one of several characteristics which Brett picked up on very quickly).

Brett was very keen to portray Holmes as close as possible to the descriptions in the books. His point of view often caused arguments over those scripts which he believed didn't reflect the stories truthfully. Eventually, Granada allowed him to have a longer rehearsal period so he could spend more time concentrating on characterization. Even so, a few episodes (such as The Last Vampyre) veer well away from the original stories.

The Series

Jeremy Brett is thought of by many to be the archetypal Sherlock Holmes. He brought humour, honesty and a great intensity to the part, giving a most realistic portrayal of the character and his many facets and foibles. The productions also utilised realistic sets and stuck quite closely to the books. Following The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, the series continued with The Return of Sherlock Holmes, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Two TV movies were also made: The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Sign of Four.

Thankfully, due to endless repeats and DVD's, Brett's TV exploits are now available for Sherlock Holmes fans everywhere, with the whole series available as a boxed set.

Poster from: The Secret of Sherlock Holmes
Poster from: The Secret of Sherlock Holmes | Source

Detective on Stage

Jeremy Brett was also well known as an actor in the theatre, and between 1988 and 1989 he portrayed Sherlock Holmes on stage, along with Edward Hardwicke as Watson. The play, written by Jeremy Paul (who also wrote several episodes of the ITV series), was titled "The Secret of Sherlock Holmes" and ran for over a year, touring all over the UK.

Mental Health

Taking on the role of Holmes however, took its toll on Brett's health. After the death of his second wife, Joan Sullivan Wilson, who died of cancer in 1985, evidence of Brett's battle against depression became more noticeable - particularly in some of the later episodes in the series. In "The Mazarin Stone" for instance, Brett appears only for a few minutes at the beginning and very briefly at the end, with his role being largely taken over by Charles Gray (as Mycroft).

Brett's Legacy

The Internet Movie Database (IMDB) lists more than 260 TV series, movies, cartoons and short films portraying Arthur Conan Doyle's infamous detective. However, I think only Jeremy Brett has really explored the character thoroughly and revealed Sherlock Homes the way Doyle described him. Brett's legacy is a truly great collection of crime dramas, but it’s terribly sad that his best work probably contributed to his untimely death:

"When I came out of the asylum, the person who collected me was Edward Hardwicke. He took me to an Italian restaurant. I had a pasta and a glass of red wine. He then drove me back to my home where we sat and had a cup of tea".

Sherlock Holmes: Complete Collection (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes / the Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes / the Return of Sherlock Holmes)[Region 2]
Sherlock Holmes: Complete Collection (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes / the Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes / the Return of Sherlock Holmes)[Region 2]

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes - The Complete Collection, features forty-one episodes from the popular ITV series, including five feature-length films. Jeremy Brett was joined by a host of guest-stars, all eager to play Holmesian villains. David Burke tagged along as Dr Watson, though he was replaced later in the series by Edward Hardwicke.

 

Answers to the Sherlock actors

From left to right: Tom Baker, Jonathan Pryce, Arthur Wontner, Basil Rathbone, Benedict Cumberbatch, Peter Cushing, Richard Roxburgh, Ronald Howard, Nicol Williamson, Christopher Lee, Jonny Lee Miller, Ben Syder, Eille Norwood, Douglas Wilmer, Roger Moore and Stewart Granger.

Who's the Sherlockian Daddy?

Thinking about Conan Doyle's original stories, which actor do you think has brought the most accuracy to the role of Sherlock Holmes?

See results

Sherlock/Jeremy's Best Bits

Comments

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    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Cheers mate, glad you enjoyed it, and thanks for taking the time to respond.

    • dreamaserve profile image

      Chase Smith 

      3 years ago from London, Great Britain

      Compared to other actors, I liked Jeremy Brett's version of Holmes the most. I enjoyed the reading this article, keep up the great work Colin.

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Gene - there's a UK government website called Scotland's People that might be able to help in your search.

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      Thanks for the response, thought I would ask.

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      I'm afraid I'm not the one to ask about Scottish names/families - although my own family were originally from Scotland, it was back in 1640, so we don't have any roots here now.

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      Sorry, here in the states we get the Sherlock Holmes series on BBC America, or PBS, which seems to acknowledge BBC a lot. I'll have to look at the credits at the end more closely. Thank you for the correction, I believe we should provide praise when it is to to the right people.

      On a side note, my grandfather's wife was born in Scotland, her last name was McAlpine. Would there be a particular region in Scotland where she would be from. This would have been around 1880, I am trying to trace family for my grandchildren.

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Actually it was ITV, not BBC, who made the Brett series, which is unusual, since it's one of the things ITV did very well (they're not generally noted for their integrity). The era it was produced was also I think a time when more thought was put into making a TV series, rather than a lot of the rubbish we see now. Thanks for raeding, Gene.

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      I like most of the movie versions of Sherlock Holmes that I have seen, especially when they are well done. I appreciate the level of integrity Jeremy Brett and the others brought to the BBC mystery version of Sherlock Holmes. It will always be my favorite. I think the BBC team made a special effort to capture what Conan Doyle created and they succeeded providing the viewing audience a hint of what London must have been like in Sherlock's time. They also maintained an integrity to the stories such that one can honestly say that the dramatized production lived up to the original story. The written stories are not better when compared to the movies, but are enhanced in the rereading after seeing the movies.

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      I do like Cumberbatch - he's an excellent actor, but he doesn't have the panache of Brett. Be interesting to see how the 'Victorian era' version of Sherlock goes down, though - I might have to change my mind. Thanks for reading, Judi.

    • Judi Bee profile image

      Judi Brown 

      3 years ago from UK

      Some disagreement in our household - teenage daughter says Benedict Cumberbatch, I say Brett. Interesting hub, thanks!

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      I've read a lot of Agatha Christie, though I think the TV and movie adaptations are often better than the books, especially with David Suchet, who, as you say, brings that same authenticity to the work.

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      I think to appreciate Sherlock Holmes, one must read the stories by A. Conan Doyle. There have been a number of different actors portraying him, but I think Jeremy Brett captured what Doyle created better than any other actor.

      If you are an Agatha Christie fan, particularly Hercule Perrotte, then I suggest that David Suchet brings that same authenticity to his character.

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Have to say I'm a big fan of RDJ too, though I think his Holmes is probably more action-packed than Conan Doyle would have liked. Thanks for reading!

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 

      3 years ago from Orange, Texas

      I've never even heard of Jeremy Brett, probably because I'm an American. Sherlock Holmes to me looks and acts like Robert Downy, Jr. But what do I know? This was still interesting, and I have watched movies with Basil Rathbone as Holmes, but I never like him as well in the part as Robert Downy, Jr. I could be a bit prejudice, though. I like Robert Downy, Jr. in everything he's in. Ironman is just it as far as I'm concerned!

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Yes - pure Conan Doyle!

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      Having read most of the stories, I think Jeremy Brett captured Holmes beautifully in that particular gesture.

      Gene Poschman

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      You're right - I've just watched it. Holmes leaps into the air at the top of some steps outside the client's house.

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      I could be wrong about which one I am talking about, at the end he leaps into the air after solving the case away from the client of course.

      Gene

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Hi Gene, I'll have to have another look at that one!

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      I think the closest you see, and it is in character is at the end of , I believe it is "The Second Stain".

      Gene Poschman

    • FatBoyThin profile imageAUTHOR

      Colin Garrow 

      3 years ago from Kinneff, Scotland

      Hi gposchman - thanks for your comments. Re "On the Street Where You LIve" yes, I've seen it, and you'd hardly think it was the same man. Be interesting to see Holmes doing a soft-shoe shuffle!

    • gposchman profile image

      Gene Poschman 

      3 years ago from San Francisco Bay Area

      An excellent article, and I think Jeremy indeed is the quintessential Sherlock Holmes. But to take a sideways step to look at his career, see the film My Fair Lady. There you will witness Jeremy as a song and dance man as he performs "On the Street Where You Live", he plays Freddy.

      Gene Poschman

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