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30 Forgotten Rock Guitarists

Updated on June 22, 2020
Kosmo profile image

A rock guitarist since the 1970s, Kelley has been a fan of rock, blues and jazz since the 1960s.

Don't forget these guys and gals!

The years go by and you wonder what happened to so-and-so? So here is a list of rock guitarists who made a splash of some sort a while back and then suffered more or less from diminished exposure, waning popularity—or death. At any rate, they left a legacy of fine licks most people would like hearing again and again.

Keep in mind, this list is in no particular order. After all, who could be considered the most forgotten rock guitarist of all?

John Cippolina (second from left) with the Quicksilver Messenger Service
John Cippolina (second from left) with the Quicksilver Messenger Service

1. John Cipollina

Trained as a classical pianist, John Cipollina didn’t just play the usual pentatonic rock and blues riffs; he meandered about the fretboard, producing a plethora of melodic and evocative notes, inflected with plenty of whammy bar, his signature, particularly during the psychedelic era. Simply stated, nobody played lead guitar like John Cipollina! One of the forerunners of the San Francisco Bay Area sound in the middle 1960s, Cipollina played lead guitar for the fabulous Quicksilver Messenger Service, until the band went “poppy” in the early 1970s. Perhaps his best effort with the band was the album Happy Trails, recorded live. Then Cipollina played for Copperhead and numerous other bands until his death, attributed to respiratory problems, in 1989.

Rory Gallagher
Rory Gallagher

2. Rory Gallagher

Rory Gallagher, an Irish-born singer and lead guitarist was another one of those rockers from the British Isles who took American blues and gave it a modern spin. Gallagher joined the trio Taste in the late 1960s, which toured with groups such as Cream and Blind Faith, and was overall considered an impressive entity in the ilk of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Then in the 1970s, Gallagher formed his own trio, essentially going solo, as he played his brand of impassioned, energetic blues. Eric Clapton once said that Gallagher “got him back into the blues.” Gallagher was also known for his long performances. Later, his music showed a jazz influence, and his blues assumed a more “mature” sound. Rory Gallagher died of complications related to a liver transplant in 1995.

Elliott Randall
Elliott Randall

3. Elliott Randall

Growing up in New York City, Elliott Randall played with the likes of Richie Havens, Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. Then, in the early 1970s, Randall formed the group Randall’s Island, and their eponymous first album, including such catchy tunes as “Take Out the Dog and Bark the Cat,” is a classic. In 1972, Randall went to California and played guitar on Steely Dan’s first album Can’t Buy a Thrill. Guitarist Jimmy Page considers Randall’s solo on “Reelin’ in the Years” his favorite. Over the years, Randall has worked primarily as a session player for artists such as the Doobie Brothers, Carly Simon, Peter Frampton, and has also worked as a musical consultant on Saturday Night Live and for filmmaker Oliver Stone. Randall currently performs with Randall’s Rangers.

Leigh Stephens (center) with Blue Cheer
Leigh Stephens (center) with Blue Cheer

4. Leigh Stephens

Leigh Stephens was lead guitarist for Blue Cheer, a blues-tinged, acid rock power trio that erupted upon the San Francisco Bay Area scene in 1968. The Band’s fuzzy, distorted version of “Summertime Blues,” climbed to number fourteen on the Billboard Hot 100. Their first album, Vincebus Eruptum, is a definite forerunner of heavy metal and grunge, anticipating groups such as Grand Funk Railroad and Black Sabbath. Incidentally, Blue Cheer called itself the loudest rock band in the world. Unfairly compared to other rock trios such as Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Blue Cheer’s music was, in comparison, raw and chaotic, like watching an erupting volcano after taking a hit of Purple Owsley. After recording two albums with Blue Cheer, Stephens went on to form Silver Metre in 1969. Stephens performed at the Summer of Love Fortieth Anniversary concert in San Francisco in September 2007.

Tommy Bolin
Tommy Bolin

5. Tommy Bolin

Tommy Bolin started his career as a guitarist for the rock group Zephyr, producing two albums and opening for such bands as Led Zeppelin. Then in 1972, Bolin played on Billy Cobham’s album Spectrum, which highlighted Bolin’s talent for blazing jazz-fusion guitar, and this may be Bolin’s best work. Next, Bolin replaced Joe Walsh in the James Gang, churning out two albums, Bang and Miami. Then, in the middle 1970s, Bolin replaced Ritchie Blackmore, lead guitarist for Deep Purple and also produced the solo album, Teaser. Unfortunately, drug addiction got the better of Bolin at the very young age of 25. After playing a gig with Jeff Beck, Tommy Bolin, having taken a variety of hard drugs, died of complications thereof on December 4, 1976. Chuck Morris said that Tommy was so good he “could cry on that guitar.”

Frank Marino
Frank Marino

6. Frank Marino

One of many so-called Jimi Hendrix imitators in the 1970s, Frank Marino was perhaps the best of that bunch, with all due respect to lovers of Robin Trower, naturally. In the late 1960s, Marino had some kind of direction-altering epiphany while hospitalized for overindulgence in the drug LSD and, reacting to this, the press started saying Marino was Hendrix reincarnated, though Marino denies this hype. (Listening to Marino’s version of “Purple Haze,” you might think the story was true!) At any rate, suitably inspired, Marino then formed the group Mahogany Rush in 1970, eventually producing over ten albums with the band. Over the years, Marino has also produced two solo albums. Interestingly, he has two sons, Danny and Mike, who play in rock bands. In an interview, Marino was asked who he would love to jam with, alive or dead, and he chose Jimi Hendrix. Surprise!

Shuggie Otis
Shuggie Otis

7. Shuggie Otis

A definite guitar prodigy by the age of 15, Shuggie Otis (son of R&B bandleader Johnny Otis) recorded in 1969 the album Kooper Session with blues great Al Kooper. Sounding like a younger version of Mike Bloomfield, Shuggie’s licks are titillating on the tunes “Slow Goonbash Blues” and “Shuggie’s Shuffle.” Then in the 1970s, Shuggie continued his career in the jazz and R&B vein, writing the hit song “Strawberry Letter 23”. In 1974, Shuggie played all the instruments on the album Inspiration Information, a jazzy R&B, variety-filled experience evocative of Sly Stone and the Brothers Johnson, though it never really caught on. Incidentally, when Mick Taylor quit the Rolling Stones, Shuggie was offered the job, but he declined. More recently, in the 1990s, Shuggie Otis played with his own band in northern California.


Erik Braunn (right) with Iron Butterfly
Erik Braunn (right) with Iron Butterfly

8. Erik Braunn

Another guitar prodigy, Erik Braunn played lead guitar with acid rock band Iron Butterfly when he was only 16. Braunn picked lead axe on the band’s number one hit “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida,” one of the longest rock songs ever produced at 17 minutes. Braunn’s guitar solo on the marathon, emphasizing pedal effects, is one of the best from the period. In 1970, Braunn left the Butterfly and formed Flintwhistle, about which little is known except they performed live here and there. Then he worked as a studio musician until he formed a new version of Iron Butterfly in 1974, which lasted until 1977. Braunn, while working on his first solo album, died of a heart attack in July 2003.


Elvin Bishop
Elvin Bishop

9. Elvin Bishop

Elvin Bishop has been playing gigs seemingly forever. Born about the same time as Jimi Hendrix in 1942, Bishop, while going to the University of Chicago, joined the renowned Paul Butterfield Blues Band in 1963, trading licks with fellow lead guitarist Mike Bloomfield, until Bloomfield left and then Bishop became the main guitar man, doing plenty of singing as well, sometimes with comedic intent, such as on the novelty tune “Drunk Again.” Primarily a blues guitarist, though he dabbles much in rock ‘n’ roll and R&B, Bishop formed his own group in 1968. Bishop’s biggest hit came in 1976 with the release of “Fooled Around and Fell in Love,” which made it to #3 on the Billboard Hot 100. Then in 2008, Bishop released The Blues Roll On, featuring fellow blues artists B.B. King, Warren Haynes, George Thorogood and many others. Elvin Bishop will probably still be rocking in the twenty-second century!


Leslie West
Leslie West

10. Leslie West

Leslie West hit the big time when he formed the group Mountain in 1969. The band’s big hit was “Mississippi Queen,” which showed-off West’s hard-driving rock guitar and wailing, hell-bent singing. Mountain also performed at Woodstock, where West played a searing guitar solo on Jack Bruce’s “Theme for an Imaginary Western.” A hefty fellow, West’s nickname was “The Great Fatsby,” though these days he looks trimmer. Then, in 1974, West formed a power trio with bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Corky Laing, billed to be the next super group, but, alas, this never came to pass. For a short time, West put together the Leslie West Band. Moving on, Leslie West continues ripping along as a solo performer and occasionally regroups new incarnations of Mountain.

Robbie Krieger (upper left) with the Doors
Robbie Krieger (upper left) with the Doors

11. Robbie Krieger

Robbie Krieger has come full circle with the Doors, one of the most unique and influential rock bands ever. Krieger started as the band’s lead guitarist back in 1966, joining up with legendary singer/poet Jim Morrison. What many people may not know is that Krieger wrote many of the songs for which the band became famous, including “Love Me Two Times,” “Touch Me,” “You’re Lost Little Girl” and, most memorably, “Light My Fire,” perhaps the greatest Top 40 rock tune of the 1960s. Krieger showed his unique guitar style with long solos on songs such as “The End,” “When the Music’s Over,” and the long version of “Light My Fire.” Generally playing his signature Gibson SG, Krieger’s guitar style shows many influences - sitar music, flamenco, folk, jazz and blues. In the early 2000s, the Doors reformed, with Ian Asbury replacing the deceased Jim Morrison. Krieger also continues working as a solo artist and studio musician.

Alvin Lee
Alvin Lee

12. Alvin Lee

Alvin Lee began playing lead guitar in 1960 with the core of a rock band that would eventually become Ten Years After, which released its first album in 1967. The band’s breakthrough came with Lee’s rollicking, frenetic, singing out-of-the-side-of-his-mouth performance at Woodstock, perhaps stealing the show, and propelling the band to stardom, which it maintained until the middle 1970s. At this point, Lee, feeling limited by the band, left Ten Years After and formed Alvin Lee and Company, “a funky little outfit,” as Lee called it, releasing the double live recording In Flight, an R&B and rock extravaganza in 1975. Then Lee formed a power trio called Ten Years Later, of all names, garnering recognition and praise. In the 1980s, Lee formed the Alvin Lee Band. To date, Lee has released many solo efforts, including Saguitar in 2007. Alvin Lee passed on March 6, 2013.

Peter Green
Peter Green

13. Peter Green

Peter Green was the founder of the spectacular Fleetwood Mac, though long before they converted to mainstream rock in the middle 1970s. A blues-rock guitarist/songwriter, Green was an integral aspect of the British blues movement along with Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page, both of whom lauded Green’s playing. Following that muse, Green joined with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers in 1966, sounding nearly as “God-like” as Clapton, whom he had replaced. After leaving Fleetwood Mac, Green suffered from bouts of schizophrenia, perhaps exacerbated by his overindulgence in LSD and cocaine. Green became a tramp-like recluse for six years, and then made a comeback in the 1990s, forming the Peter Green Splinter Group, eventually making nine albums with the band. Though Greene’s anti-psychotic medication can hinder his playing ability, he continues to riff in concerts, performing with Peter Green and Friends.

Mark Farner
Mark Farner

14. Mark Farner

Mark Farner founded the fabulously successful power trio Grand Funk Railroad in 1969. Almost immediately, the band drew monstrous crowds and eventually produced numerous albums, many gold or platinum. Although Farner was never known for his technical virtuosity on the guitar, he became a kind of one-man band (as trios sometimes need!), playing lead guitar and keyboards, banging on percussion and writing most of the group’s songs. Then Farner left the band in 1977, going solo with albums such as Mark Farner. After that, Farner began playing Christian rock in the 1980s. Later, in the middle 1990s, Farner joined Ringo Starr’s All-Star Band, and finally reformed the original Grand Funk Railroad in the late 1990s. Farner currently tours, often playing Grand Funk standards as well as his solo material.

Jorma Kaukonen
Jorma Kaukonen

15. Jorma Kaukonen

Jorma Kaukonen’s blues/bluegrass/rock guitar style highlighted the Jefferson Airplane, an acid rock band formed in San Francisco in 1965. Kaukonen’s acoustic fingerpicking licks can be heard on the band’s album Surrealistic Pillow, particularly the cut “Embryonic Journey.” The Airplane’s lead guitarist, Kaukonen provided requisite rock chops with the best guitarists in the San Francisco Bay Area. After the Airplane broke up in 1973 (some members joining the new Jefferson Starship), Kaukonen and bassist Jack Casady formed Hot Tuna, an assemblage which lasted much longer than the Airplane. Over the years, Kaukonen has recorded a dozen solo albums and joined the reformation of the Jefferson Airplane in 1989. These days, Kaukonen as his wife Vanessa Lillian operate the Fur Peace Ranch in Ohio, where Kaukonen gives guitar lessons, a new pastime he really enjoys.

Peter Frampton
Peter Frampton

16. Peter Frampton

British rocker Peter Frampton joined his first major rock group, Humble Pie, in 1969. About this time, Frampton also did lots of session work with rock luminaries such as George Harrison, Harry Nilsson and Jerry Lee Lewis. Then Frampton went solo in 1971, producing the album Wind of Change, utilizing guest artist Ringo Starr. But his early solo albums had little commercial success. This changed, however, when Frampton produced the quintessential arena rock album, Frampton Comes Alive!, one of the best rock albums of the era, and one of the best-selling live albums of all time. The album’s hook-laden hits “Baby, I Love Your Way,” “Show Me the Way” and “Do You Feel Like We Do” have become staples on classic rock stations. Since then, Frampton has tried to recapture the magic with varying degrees of success, doing some work with friend David Bowie in the middle to late 1980s. Frampton’s album Fingerprints, highlighting his versatility, won a Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Album in 2007.


Terry Kath
Terry Kath

17. Terry Kath

Terry Kath became the lead guitarist for Chicago in 1969. On Chicago’s debut album, Kath displayed much of his guitar versatility, particularly on “Free Form Guitar,” a solo effort on which Kath rips up and down the neck, using heavy distortion, wah-wah pedal and whammy bar, a tour de force reminiscent of the best hard rock of Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck or Eric Clapton. Kath showed similar soloing prowess on the song “25 or 6 to 4.” Also excelling at singing and writing songs, Kath continued playing lead guitar for Chicago until his tragic death in 1978. While at a party, Kath pointed a 9 mm semi-automatic pistol at his head. Thinking the gun was unloaded because he had ejected the magazine, he jokingly pulled the trigger and the pistol went off, killing him instantly. Kath failed to realize there could still be a bullet in the chamber of the pistol!

Interestingly, in 1968 when Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin were headliners in a show at the Whisky a Go Go in West Hollywood, Chicago was the opening act. While watching Chicago perform, Hendrix told Chicago bandmate Walt Parazaider, “Jeez, your horn players are like one set of lungs and your guitar player is better than me."


Mike Bloomfield
Mike Bloomfield

18. Mike Bloomfield

Appropriately, Mike Bloomfield was born in Chicago, Illinois, home of the Chicago style of blues, aka urban or electric blues. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Bloomfield, of Jewish ethnicity, honed his blues guitar licks with bluesmen such as Sleepy John Estes, Little Brother Montgomery, Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters and many others. In 1965, Bloomfield’s leap forward came when he joined The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which recorded the highly influential album East-West in 1966. Then Bloomfield became the guitarist for the short-lived Electric Flag. He also performed and/or recorded with Bob Dylan, Al Kooper, Chuck Berry, Mitch Ryder, James Cotton and numerous others. Throughout the 1970s he was a solo act and produced many albums. Notably, Bloomfield was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2015. He was discovered dead in his car on Feb. 15, 1981, age 37. Heroin and cocaine were found in his system.

Roy Buchanan
Roy Buchanan

19. Roy Buchanan

Buchanan began his career in the late 1950s to early ‘60s, playing as a sideman for various bands or working as a session guitarist. Buchanan didn’t rely on pedal effects; he simply used the volume and tone knobs on his Telecaster. In the middle 1960s he played in Danny Denver’s Band and was considered one of the best guitarists around. Even Jimi Hendrix was impressed by him, especially his harmonic “pinch” technique and, not surprisingly, Buchanan played some of Hendrix’s songs. Buchanan gained national fame as a solo artist in the 1970s; the Rolling Stones wanted him but he famously turned them down! In 2004, Guitar Player magazine listed Buchanan as having one of the “50 Greatest Tones of All Time.” Buchanan died on August 14, 1988, having hanged himself in a jail cell.


Bruce Conte
Bruce Conte

20. Bruce Conte

Bruce Conte is an R&B and jazz fusion guitarist who grew up in Fresno, California and hit the club scene in the late 1960s, performing in Common Ground. Then in 1969 Conte moved to the San Francisco Bay Area and joined Loading Zone. His big break came in 1972 when he became the guitarist for Tower of Power, an R&B, funk and soul band out of Oakland, California. Conte played with Tower of Power until 1979, having recorded with them on some of their best albums - Tower of Power, Back to Oakland and Urban Renewal. Perhaps his greatest solo can be heard on “What Is Hip.” After leaving TOP, Conte played with a number of other bands and produced four solo albums.


Buzz Feiten
Buzz Feiten

21. Howard “Buzz” Feiten

When just 20 years old, Buzz Feiten replaced lead guitarist Elvin Bishop in the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which famously performed at Woodstock. Feiten’s Hendrix-like guitar solo can be heard on “Everything’s Gonna Be All Right.” Thereafter, Feiten played with bands such as The Rascals and the Dave Weckl Band and has worked as a session guitarist with numerous famous musicians, including Gregg Allman, Randy Brecker, Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder. In 1982, Feiten produced his debut album, Full Moon, and then produced a sequel for it in 1999. Interestingly, Feiten makes solid-body electric guitars (you can see his last name on the headstock) and has patented a tuning system for guitars.


Henry Vestine (center of photo)
Henry Vestine (center of photo)

22. Henry “The Sunflower” Vestine

Specializing in 1960s-style, electric blues, Henry Vestine was one of the original guitarists for Canned Heat, a progressive, boogie-rock blues band which formed in 1966 and performed at the Monterey Pop Festival and Woodstock, though Vestine had quit the group right before Woodstock and didn’t perform there (Harvey Mandel took his place). Notably, Vestine excelled at playing long, improvisational guitar solos, evidence of which can be heard on the Canned Heat double-album Living the Blues (1969), particularly the cut “Refried Boogie.” Into the 1970s and beyond, Vestine played with Canned Heat occasionally and other bands such as The

Mick Taylor (left) with Mick Jagger
Mick Taylor (left) with Mick Jagger

23. Mick Taylor

Maybe Mick Taylor’s major claim to fame is that he had the audacity to quit the Rolling Stones in 1974, mainly because he thought he wasn’t getting enough credit for his songwriting. Nevertheless, Taylor has performed with the Stones many times as recently as the 2010s, as he probably should have, because he played with the Stones during perhaps their greatest creative period (1969 – 1974). Raised in Hatfield, England, Taylor first break as a pro guitarist was at 16, when he performed with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, joining the band the following year. After leaving the Stones, Taylor joined with bassist Jack Bruce for a short time. Since then, Taylor has primarily been a solo artist, playing with Bob Dylan, Carla Olson and Joan Jett. Taylor has also worked as a session artist over the decades. Notably, in 2012, Rolling Stone magazine picked him #37 on its list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

Jan Akkerman
Jan Akkerman

24. Jan Akkerman

Jan Akkerman is a Dutch guitarist who began taking guitar lessons when he was five and helped form a rock band, Johnny and His Cellar Rockers, at 11. Then his career really took off when he helped form Focus, a progressive rock quartet, whose biggest hits were “Hocus Pocus” and “Sylvia.” Akkerman’s guitar virtuosity didn’t go unnoticed, either. In 1973, Melody Maker magazine selected him as the Best Guitarist in the World! After Focus disbanded, Akkerman, now more of a jazz fusion guitarist and lute player, launched a solo career, producing numerous albums, the latest of which Close Beauty (2019). Akkerman has also been a superb session artist, playing with Jack Bruce, Charlie Byrd, Paco de Lucia, B.B. King, Ice-T and many others.


J.J. Cale
J.J. Cale

25. J.J. Cale

J.J. Cale began his musical career in Los Angeles in the 1960s, landing a gig at the soon to be famous Whisky a Go Go, for which he was a cofounder. In 1966, he cut a demo single of “After Midnight.” But, unable to make a living in LA, Cale returned to Tulsa, Oklahoma. In 1971, he recorded his debut album Naturally, which highlighted his unique style of rock, blues, folk and jazz, and also his ability as a sound engineer. Neil Young was impressed by Cale’s guitar virtuosity: “Of all the players I ever heard, it's gotta be Jimi Hendrix and J. J. Cale who are the best electric guitar players.” Cale’s greatest hit single was “Crazy Mama,” which hit #22 on the Billboard Hot 100. Eric Clapton, who often corroborated with Cale, was also a great fan of his. “He was a fantastic musician,” Clapton said. “And he was my hero." Cale’s last studio album was Stay Around (2019), released posthumously. J.J. Cale passed on July 26, 2013.

Rick Derringer
Rick Derringer

26. Rick Derringer

Rick Derringer, guitarist, songwriter and producer, has been a rocker since 1965 when he helped form the McCoys, whose song “Hang on Sloopy,” was a #1 hit. Then in the 1970s Derringer produced “Rock and Roll, Hootchie Koo” another hit single. He often joined forces with Edgar Winter and Johnny Winter, playing lead guitar and producing their records. He also discovered celebrities such as Cyndi Lauper and “Weird Al” Yankovic; he also worked with Steely Dan, Todd Rundgren and Meatloaf, and he hung out with Andy Warhol’s circle. Derringer has said that his favorite guitar solo was on “Making Love Out of Nothing at All.” Derringer has produced 13 solo albums, and in recent times he toured with Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band. Also, in 2018, he went on tour with “HippieFest,” featuring himself, Vanilla Fudge, Mitch Ryder and Badfinger.


Sister Rosetta Tharpe
Sister Rosetta Tharpe

27. Sister Rosetta Tharpe

One of the founders rock, Sister Rosetta Tharpe was nicknamed “the original soul sister” and “the godmother of rock and roll.” Tharpe sang and played the guitar often using distortion, thereby playing what came to be called electric or urban blues. But Tharpe started as a gospel/spiritual singer in the 1930s and ’40s, recording such hits as “Rock Me,” “This Train,” “Down by the Riverside” and “Strange Things Happening Every Day” (considered one of the first rock tunes.) Tharpe’s bluesy guitar licks impressed musicians such as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Keith Richards; and Johnny Cash and Little Richard said she was their favorite singer when they were kids. In guitar battles at the Apollo Theater in NYC in the 1940s, Tharpe was often given the contradictory compliment, “she can play like a man.” In 2017, Tharpe was elected into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Sister Rosetta Tharpe passed away on October 9, 1973.


Ted Nugent
Ted Nugent

28. Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent began his musical career in 1963 when he played lead guitar for the Amboy Dukes. Then in 1975 Nugent exited the Amboy Dukes and formed his own band, which produced a number of hit albums: Ted Nugent (1975), Free-for-All (1976) and Cat Scratch Fever (1977), all of which spawning the hit singles “Hey Baby,” “Stranglehold,” “Dog Eat Dog” and “Cat Scratch Fever.” Nugent turned solo in the 1980s, producing albums, though none were critically acclaimed or popular. Nugent then joined the supergroup Damn Yankees in 1989; their power balled “High Enough” reached #3 on the Billboard Hot 100. At present, Nugent continues performing and producing solo albums, the latest of which, The Music Made Me Do It (2018.) Notably, Nugent remains an outspoken advocate for conservative causes and is a gun-toting member of the NRA.


Beverly Guitar Watkins
Beverly Guitar Watkins

29. Beverly “Guitar” Watkins

Beverly Guitar Watkins began playing guitar as a pro with Piano Red and the Meter-tones in 1959. While touring the legendary Chitlin Circuit, her guitar prowess on the blues quickly became apparent on such hit singles as “Dr. Feelgood” and “Right String but the Wrong Yo-Yo.” Over subsequent years she played with such great artists as James Brown, B.B. King and Ray Charles, though her riffs were seldom heard on the radio. But the advent of the internet in the late 1990s gave Watkins a much larger audience and the chance at a comeback at age 60. Watkins would play the guitar behind her head at various festivals in the US and other countries, blowing away the younger crowds. In 1999, Watkins produced her solo “debut” CD, Back in Business. Notably, Taj Mahal called her an “unsung hero of the blues.” Beverly Guitar Watkins passed away at 80 on October 1, 2019.

Please click on the videos below and listen to 29 Forgotten Rock Guitarists. Also, please keep in mind, if you have a slow computer, it may take five, ten or fifteen minutes to load the videos!

Dave Davies
Dave Davies

30. Dave Davies

Dave Davies was the lead guitarist for The Kinks, a British Invasion band that greatly influenced rock in the 1960s and well into the 1970s and ‘80s, when metal and punk musicians played their hits. Many rockers probably remember Davies’ distorted power chords on such hits as “You Really Got Me” and “All Day and All of the Night.” While the Kinks’ popularity declined in the 1980s, Davies began a solo career that’s continued well into the 2010s, even though a stroke in 2006 nearly ended his career. Davies last solo album was Rippin’ Up Time (2014). In the present, Davies and his brother Ray Davies may resurrect the Kinks again. Interestingly, in 1965, Davies bought a used Gibson Flying V guitar for $60 in a pawn shop; this model eventually became famous for metal guitarists.

Please click on the videos below and listen to 30 Forgotten Rock Guitarists. Also, keep in mind that if you have a slow computer, it may take five, ten or fifteen minutes to load the videos!

John Cipollina with Cobra

Rory Gallagher

Elliott Randall

Leigh Stephens on lead guitar

Erik Braunn with Iron Butterfly

Jorma Kaukonen

Tommy Bolin with Deep Purple

Frank Marino

Young Shuggie Otis

Elvin Bishop

Leslie West

Robbie Krieger with the Doors

Alvin Lee

Peter Green with Fleetwood Mac

Mark Farner with Grand Funk

Peter Frampton

Terry Kath with Chicago

Mike Bloomfield

Roy Buchanan

Bruce Conte

Buzz Feiten

Henry Vestine with Canned Heat

Mick Taylor with the Rolling Stones

Jan Akkerman

J.J. Cale with Leon Russell

Rick Derringer with the Edgar Winter Group

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Ted Nugent with Damn Yankees

Beverly Guitar Watkins

Dave Davies

© 2009 Kelley Marks

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    • profile image

      Mr B 

      2 weeks ago

      What about Ray Davies of the Kinks? Also should add short clips of each of their performances.

    • profile image

      Mark 

      3 weeks ago

      Would like to add:

      1. Martin Barre (Jethro Tull)

      2. Bill Nelson (Be Bop Deluxe)

      3. Deke Leonard (Man)

      4. Mike Slamer (City Boy and Streets)

    • profile image

      Jan Gelderloos 

      7 weeks ago

      No sound on the videos at the bottom. Too bad, because it's a great list otherwise!

    • profile image

      Woody 

      5 months ago

      Eddie Hazel

    • profile image

      David Prigent. 

      6 months ago

      Eric Baun great guitarist for Iron Butterfly, the Butterfly played much better songs than In a gada davida , 'Soul experience', 'Slower than guns' to name a few.

    • Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

      Wesman Todd Shaw 

      7 months ago from Kaufman, Texas

      If I never mentioned this being a great article, it's only because I must have got distracted by something. I've plans to write things about several of these folks.

      I often feel like I was born in the wrong decade with how I have so much preference for 1970s music.

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      7 months ago from California

      Thanks for the comment, Robert Levine. The word forgotten is relative to one's point of view. But none of them are truly forgotten as long as we have their licks on vinyl, CDs and YouTube. Adios!

    • Robert Levine profile image

      Robert Levine 

      8 months ago from Brookline, Massachusetts

      I don't think John Fogerty, Jorma Kaukonnen, or Duane Allman are forgotten. Especially Fogerty: his solo career might have faded, but I don't think a day goes by without a radio station somewhere in the United States playing a CCR song. A huge proportion of their collected work has become classic.

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      16 months ago from California

      Thanks for the comment, James A Watkins. It seems like you and your band have played many of the classic rock tunes. Must be fun to be able to play them!...

    • James A Watkins profile image

      James A Watkins 

      16 months ago from Chicago

      Great selections. Excellent writing, too. I enjoyed your Hub. Terry Kath, one of my favorites. My band used to do 25 or 6 to 4; several Mountain songs including Tired Angels; of course In A gadda da vida and Summertime Blues; but also we did Mahogany Rush tunes such as The Answer and Dragonfly; did Standing in the Rain from James Gang with Tommy Bolin; and even Messin' with the Kid by Gallagher (in fact, I have a live recording of my band doing that one). Great stuff.

    • profile image

      James 

      5 years ago

      Where is Jimmy Mcculloch ?

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      6 years ago from California

      Hey, Gans, your photo appears to be a Wikipedia Commons photo, so I shall indicate such in the caption. Satisfied? Later!

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      6 years ago from California

      Hey, David Gans, did you actually photograph Cipollina? If you did, you must be a pretty old guy. Anyway, many people have copied my Hubpages stories, and there doesn't seem to be anything I can do about it. Welcome to the Internet. Later!

    • profile image

      David Gans 

      6 years ago

      I find it kind of annoying that you posted my photo of John Cipollina without attribution.

      http://www.flickr.com/photos/dgans/187143445/in/se...

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      6 years ago from California

      Thanks for the comment, The Public Image. I enjoy hearing from guitar enthusiasts such as you and, I must say, I haven't heard of any of those guys you mentioned. More forgotten guitarists? Later!

    • The Public Image profile image

      Nik Farr 

      6 years ago from Middleton, MA

      Cool Hub, great idea and execution! I'm so glad you recognized Rory Gallagher as he just doesn't get the recognition he deserves these days.

      To your list, I would personally add the following guitarists who haven't really gotten their due:

      James Honeyman-Scott, who played on the first two Pretenders albums

      Randy California, of classic rock band Spirit

      Wilko Johnson, who played for Dr. Feelgood before going solo

      Duane Denison, mostly recognized for his work with the Jesus Lizard

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      8 years ago from California

      How about the British Isles? Later!

    • profile image

      BlackOutOrGetOut 

      8 years ago

      As pertains Mr Gallagher: Ireland is not the UK

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      8 years ago from California

      Hey, ieu50, I'll have to check out "Quantum Leap" one of these days. Thanks for the comment. Later!

    • ieu50 profile image

      ieu50 

      8 years ago from Neath, South Wales, UK.

      Great hub - brought back some fantastic memories.. Anybody remember Quantum Jump (only did 1 album: 'Quantum Jump')? Their lead guitar was Mark Warner - worth checking the album out just for his playing!

    • Mike Spain profile image

      Mike Spain 

      8 years ago from USA

      nice list

    • profile image

      Padraig O'Shea 

      9 years ago

      Rory Gallagher was not a UK guy.He was Irish...simply (it isn't part of the UK)...and he was a superb guitarist (and certainly not forgotten in Ireland)...otherwise a cracking article.

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      10 years ago from California

      Thanks for the heads-up on the Rory Gallagher festival. Wish I could be there. Later!

    • Doire60 profile image

      Doire60 

      10 years ago from Cleator Moor

      Hi Kosmo another great article, I'm off to Ireland coming weekend, for my 50th but also taking in annual Rory Gallagher in Ballyshannon, his birthplace. Festival is headlined by Bernie Marsden formally of Whitesnake, but it'll be full of tribute bands, including Shinkicker!! Keep up the good work.

    • profile image

      Paul_Steads 

      10 years ago

      Fantastic article. It was great that you have included Rory Gallagher. I really enjoyed the movie of Frank Marino.

    • moondive profile image

      moondive 

      10 years ago from Modena,Italy

      Great Hub!!!

    • Shinkicker profile image

      Shinkicker 

      10 years ago from Scotland

      Fascinating article Kosmo and wonderful to see Rory Gallagher in there. I don't call myself 'Shinkicker' for nothing :-)

    • gwinto500 profile image

      gwinto500 

      10 years ago

      Great hub featuring three of my favourite guitarists: Rory Gallagher, Leslie West and Frank Marino. Tommy Bolin: a name from the past I remember when he replaced Ritchie Blackmore in Deep Purple, but I had stopped buying Purple records by that time;so I'm not really familiar with his work despite being told he was one of the Greats! Nice to see what people were talking about on the video clip.

    • Krystal Paige profile image

      Krystal Paige 

      10 years ago from Midwest, America

      I like your taste, especially Rory Gallagher. Rory has been one major influence on my music. Nice Hub:-)

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 

      10 years ago from malang-indonesia

      great guitarist rock legend. and thanks for great picture. let's go Rock!

    • gusripper profile image

      gusripper 

      10 years ago

      Fantastic job cosmo,they all are and were in top 50 of all years

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      11 years ago from California

      Gotta dig those rock drummers!!!

    • James A Watkins profile image

      James A Watkins 

      11 years ago from Chicago

      I like what you said because I'm a drummer! :D

    • Laughing Mom profile image

      Laughing Mom 

      11 years ago

      Different music draws people for different reasons. Rock to me is more about the drums, but these guys sound pretty good.

    • Mighty Mom profile image

      Susan Reid 

      11 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

      Learned a lot from this hub. Also enjoyed the trip down memory lane. The 60s and 70s ROCKED! MM

    • James A Watkins profile image

      James A Watkins 

      11 years ago from Chicago

      I just saw Satriani last year at House of Blues Orlando! Great show

    • James A Watkins profile image

      James A Watkins 

      11 years ago from Chicago

      This is a great Hub! It brought back a lot of memories for an old musician as myself. My band regularly played "Messin' with the Kid" by Rory Gallagher. I used to play a song Tommy Bolin write with the James Gang called "Standing in the Rain." I saw Blue Cheer live in the late 60s.

      Frank Marino? My band played The Answer; Tryin' Anyway & Dragonfly hundreds of times in clubs. And Mountain! Leslie West was the king! I love that stacato style of his. And I was sort a Corky Laing type of drummer—full throttle; but I sang somewhat like Felix.

      Well, we played almost every song they ever made, including "When the wagons leave the city, for the forest and further on" and "I'm going to wrap my dreams in silver paper and give them all to you!" "Angels, Tired Angels" "Mississippi Queen" "Do you remember, the great train robbery" "Goodbye, Little Robin Marie; don't try, following me" and that;s not all . . .

    • Kosmo profile imageAUTHOR

      Kelley Marks 

      11 years ago from California

      Yes, we all dug John Cipollina's licks, espcially his tour de force on "Who Do You Love." As for Satriani, he's hardly forgotten, but I'm sure you know that!

    • fortunerep profile image

      Dori S Matte 

      11 years ago from Hillsborough

      Oh how I love the guitar, My favorite is Joe Satriani, if i spelled that right. A great hub, these guys are so talented and can literally make the guitar "talk" Love this idea!

      dori

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 

      11 years ago from East Coast, United States

      Wow, thanks for mentioning John Cipollina - I'm listening to your youtube of Quicksilver right now. I had the pleasure of attending a Quicksilver concert many long years ago - the sound always reminded me of the ocean and fresh air - he was really something! Now I'm just going to sit back and watch.

      (I love the Cobra best)

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