ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Beautiful Trees and Their Textures

Updated on April 17, 2013

Beautiful Angel Oak Tree

The 1,500 year old Angel Oak Tree in John's Island, South Carolina
The 1,500 year old Angel Oak Tree in John's Island, South Carolina | Source

A Closer Look at Trees


Trees
I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree...
from the poem by Joyce Kilmer (1886-1918)

These famous lines are the beginning of a poem, Trees, written by Joyce Kilmer in 1913. Trees have inspired poets, writers, photographers and artists through the ages. Perhaps there is a tree that inspires you?

Although I love flowering trees and trees that wear glorious colors in the autumn, my inspiration comes from the texture of trees. I love the shapes of trees, like the beautiful Angel Oak tree below. But most of all, I love to take a closer look at trees to appreciate the grain of the wood and the tiny mosses and lichens that they host. Below, I've shared some of the trees and textures that inspire me.

The 1,500 year old Angel Oak Tree

The Angel Oak Tree on John’s Island, SC near Charleston is a 1,500 year old live oak tree. It is the oldest living thing east of the Rocky Mountains. The trunk of this amazing tree has a circumference of 25 feet. The branches spread 160 feet across and cover 17,100 square feet of ground. It is 65 feet tall. In spite of all these statistics, there is nothing that can impress you as much as standing in the little park and viewing this majestic tree in person.

The 1,500 year old Angel Oak Tree in John's Island, South Carolina

The Angel Oak, oldest living thing east of the Rocky Mountains.
The Angel Oak, oldest living thing east of the Rocky Mountains. | Source

Spanish Moss - Not Moss, Not Spanish!

Spanish moss, found in humid areas of the Southeastern United States, is a common sight in Georgia, Florida and other southern states. It drapes live oaks and some other trees in romantic lace that turns from gray to green when it rains. Spanish moss is not related to mosses or lichen, but is classified as a bromeliad. Although it can slow the growth rate of trees because it blocks the sunlight, it doesn't harm the trees. It lives on air and sunlight and rain. There's something magical about that.

Spanish Moss - A Bromelaid Mistaken for a Moss

Lacey Spanish moss brings to mind romantic scenes of the old South.
Lacey Spanish moss brings to mind romantic scenes of the old South. | Source

Trees Are Survivors

The trees below are stripped of bark and leaves, but their size and twisted branches and trunks are proof of the hardships they endured before finally dying. The turns in the branches and twisted grain in the tree trunks are from strong winds constantly pushing at the trees. These trees are in Louisiana in Fountainebleau State Park located on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain not far from New Orleans. They survived many hurricanes before they finally gave up.

Twisted trunks and branches are the result of hurrican force winds twisting them

Stripped of bark, the twisted wood is visible. These trees stand in Fountainebleau State Park, not too far from New Orleans.
Stripped of bark, the twisted wood is visible. These trees stand in Fountainebleau State Park, not too far from New Orleans. | Source
A tree in Fountainebleau State Park located on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain.
A tree in Fountainebleau State Park located on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. | Source

Driftwood on the Beach

Driftwood on the beach in North Carolina is frayed and damp. What was once a tree decked out in beautiful leaves or fragrant needles is now an unidentifiable piece of driftwood lying on the sand. But its life is not over. Someone is sure to come along and notice that this beautiful piece of driftwood is nature's sculpture, and that will make a beautiful landscaping centerpiece in a lawn or flower bed.

Driftwood on a North Carolina Beach

This piece of driftwood may end up as a centerpiece in someone's home landscape.
This piece of driftwood may end up as a centerpiece in someone's home landscape. | Source

The Texture of Tees

Trees dress the landscape with their texture, colors, shapes and beauty all year around. I particularly love the textures of trees. I enjoy looking at the bark and grain of the wood closeup, examining the bark and the lichen and mosses that grow on live trees or old deadwood. When wood is wet, the textures and grains are more prominent. Wood will darken and interesting mosses and lichens will seem brighter. There is no better time to look closely at trees than in the rain or after a rain.

Lichen is bright on trees wet after a rain

Bright green lichen on rain drenched wood.
Bright green lichen on rain drenched wood. | Source

Trees of the Hoh Rainforest Host Numerous forms of plant and wildlife

In the Hoh rain forest, part of the Olympic National Park in Washington, trees are covered with mosses, ferns and lichen. Bromeliads hang from the branches forming a mystical, other-world effect. Even the fallen, rotting trees are nurseries to new growth, providing nutrients and shelter for young trees.

Trees of the Hoh Rainforest

The trees of the Hoh rainforest are home to bromelaids, mosses and ferns as well as many kinds of birds and other wildlife.
The trees of the Hoh rainforest are home to bromelaids, mosses and ferns as well as many kinds of birds and other wildlife. | Source

An Ancient Cedar Tree Survives

This ancient cedar tree is twisted and frayed. The wood grain is splintered and rough on the trunk and branches, yet it tenaciously clings to life. There's something heartening about seeing the clusters of green leaves on this beautiful old tree.

An Ancient Cedar Tree in Sedona

This ancient cedar tree in Sedona is weathered and twisted, but still survives.
This ancient cedar tree in Sedona is weathered and twisted, but still survives. | Source

Pine Trees in the Springtime

Have you ever looked closely at the evergreen trees in the spring? Their needles brighten and the beginnings of pine cones are evident in the pretty buds tinged with pink and yellow. Look closely, and you will see the odd formations that will someday be the dry pine cones that you might collect for your fall and holiday decorations.

Pine Tree Buds

Evergreen trees in bud.
Evergreen trees in bud. | Source
Bud of a pine tree. Did you ever see a pine cone bud?
Bud of a pine tree. Did you ever see a pine cone bud? | Source

A Fresh Look at Trees

I hope that these photographs have given you a fresh look at trees. Perhaps they will inspire you to write a poem, paint a picture or imagine a story. Perhaps you'll be inspired to take your camera out in the rain and take a walk in the woods.

Enjoy the trees around you through the changing seasons, but don't forget to take a closer look - there's much more to see!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Copyright ©2011 Stephanie Henkel

If you love to take photographs and write

Showcase your photographs or publish your fiction, non-fiction or poetry - it's FREE on HubPages! In fact, you can write on any subject that interests you and make some money, too. Click here to sign up for free!

working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)