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150 Pictures of Tigers - Sleeping, Swimming, with Cubs, and More!

Updated on January 11, 2014
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Pictures of Tigers

The tiger is the largest cat species and is recognizable by its characteristic orange fur and black stripes. Like humans and fingerprints, no two tigers have the same pattern of stripes. Researchers believe that tigers’ stripes serve as camouflage, concealing them in forest shadows as they hunt their prey.

Once numbering over 100,000 at the beginning of the 20th century, the tiger has become an endangered species with 3,000-4,000 currently living in the wild, mainly in northeastern China, Korea, Russia, and parts of India and the Himalayan region. This dramatic population reduction is a result of habitat destruction and poaching for fur and body parts. Most tigers live in zoos, with the largest captive populations in the United States (about 4,700) and China (about 4,000).

In descending order of population, the six subspecies of tiger living today are the Bengal tiger, the Indochinese tiger, the Malayan tiger, the Sumatran tiger, the Siberian tiger, and the South China tiger. The Bengal tiger, also called the Indian tiger, is the most numerous subspecies. They have coats ranging from yellow to light orange in color and stripes that are either dark brown or black. Males weigh 180-260 kg (400-570 lb), with females a bit smaller.

Bengal tiger at Raubtierpark Subingen
Bengal tiger at Raubtierpark Subingen | Source
Bengal tiger at Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary in India
Bengal tiger at Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary in India | Source
Bengal tiger lying in the grass and yawning at Raubtierpark Subingen
Bengal tiger lying in the grass and yawning at Raubtierpark Subingen | Source
Bengal tiger at Ranthambhore National Park in India
Bengal tiger at Ranthambhore National Park in India | Source
Bengal tiger at Ranthambhore National Park in India
Bengal tiger at Ranthambhore National Park in India | Source
Bengal tiger at Ranthambhore National Park in India
Bengal tiger at Ranthambhore National Park in India | Source
Bengal tigers in Karnataka, India
Bengal tigers in Karnataka, India | Source
Indochinese tigers are smaller and darker than Bengal tigers, and they live in forests in mountainous or hilly regions. These Indochinese tigers are at Tierpark Berlin.
Indochinese tigers are smaller and darker than Bengal tigers, and they live in forests in mountainous or hilly regions. These Indochinese tigers are at Tierpark Berlin. | Source
Indochinese tiger at Tierpark Berlin
Indochinese tiger at Tierpark Berlin | Source
Malayan tigers are found on the Malay Peninsula and are similar in appearance to Indochinese tigers. These are two Malayan tigers at the Cincinnati Zoo.
Malayan tigers are found on the Malay Peninsula and are similar in appearance to Indochinese tigers. These are two Malayan tigers at the Cincinnati Zoo. | Source
Malayan tiger
Malayan tiger | Source
The Sumatran tiger, found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, is the smallest tiger subspecies. Males weigh just 100-140 kg (220-310 lb). This photo is of a Sumatran tiger at the Melbourne Zoo.
The Sumatran tiger, found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, is the smallest tiger subspecies. Males weigh just 100-140 kg (220-310 lb). This photo is of a Sumatran tiger at the Melbourne Zoo. | Source
Sumatran tiger yawning at the Frankfurt Zoo in Germany
Sumatran tiger yawning at the Frankfurt Zoo in Germany | Source
The Siberian tiger, also called the Amur tiger, is the largest living cat, with some males weighing as much as 177 kg (390 lb). This Siberian tiger is at the Buffalo Zoo.
The Siberian tiger, also called the Amur tiger, is the largest living cat, with some males weighing as much as 177 kg (390 lb). This Siberian tiger is at the Buffalo Zoo. | Source
Siberian tiger yawning (Buffalo Zoo). Siberian tigers have thicker coats, a paler golden color, and fewer stripes than other subspecies.
Siberian tiger yawning (Buffalo Zoo). Siberian tigers have thicker coats, a paler golden color, and fewer stripes than other subspecies. | Source
Elena, a Siberian tiger at the Zürich Zoo in Switzerland
Elena, a Siberian tiger at the Zürich Zoo in Switzerland | Source
Elena
Elena | Source
Elena
Elena | Source
Male Siberian tiger at the Bronx Zoo
Male Siberian tiger at the Bronx Zoo | Source
Siberian tiger at Aalborg Zoo, Denmark
Siberian tiger at Aalborg Zoo, Denmark | Source
Male Siberian tiger at Leipzig Zoo in Germany
Male Siberian tiger at Leipzig Zoo in Germany | Source
Siberian tiger at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany
Siberian tiger at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany | Source
Siberian tiger at Tierpark Berlin
Siberian tiger at Tierpark Berlin | Source
Two young male Siberian tigers at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany
Two young male Siberian tigers at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany | Source
Young Siberian tiger
Young Siberian tiger | Source
A tiger at Franklin Park Zoo, Massachusetts, USA
A tiger at Franklin Park Zoo, Massachusetts, USA | Source
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Tiger at Zoo Dortmund in Germany
Tiger at Zoo Dortmund in Germany | Source
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Tiger performing the Flehmen response, which helps them detect scents
Tiger performing the Flehmen response, which helps them detect scents | Source
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Pictures of Tigers’ Faces

Bengal tigers, the most numerous tiger subspecies, have the longest canines of any large cat. Their canines can be as long as 10 centimeters (4 inches)! You can see these teeth up close in some of the photos below. Also notice that stripes around tigers’ eyes tend to be symmetrical, but stripes around the face are often asymmetrical.

Sumatran tiger
Sumatran tiger | Source
Sumatran tiger
Sumatran tiger | Source
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Sumatran tiger
Sumatran tiger | Source
Siberian tiger
Siberian tiger | Source
Sumatran tiger
Sumatran tiger | Source
Sumatran tiger
Sumatran tiger | Source
Siberian tiger
Siberian tiger | Source
Siberian tiger
Siberian tiger | Source
Sumatran tiger
Sumatran tiger | Source
Sumatran tiger at a zoo in Spain
Sumatran tiger at a zoo in Spain | Source
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Malayan tiger
Malayan tiger | Source
Closeup of a golden tiger, also called golden tabby tiger or strawberry tiger. Golden tigers are not a distinct subspecies; their color is the result of a rare genetic variation. There are fewer than 30 golden tigers in the world, all in captivity.
Closeup of a golden tiger, also called golden tabby tiger or strawberry tiger. Golden tigers are not a distinct subspecies; their color is the result of a rare genetic variation. There are fewer than 30 golden tigers in the world, all in captivity. | Source
The white tiger is a genetic variation of the Bengal tiger. Like golden tigers, white tigers are not a distinct subspecies. Though extremely rare in the wild, white tigers are popular in zoos because of their unique coloring.
The white tiger is a genetic variation of the Bengal tiger. Like golden tigers, white tigers are not a distinct subspecies. Though extremely rare in the wild, white tigers are popular in zoos because of their unique coloring. | Source
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Pictures of Tigers Sleeping

Tigers spend most of their time sleeping and resting. On average, they spend about 16 hours per day sleeping, twice as much as humans! Why do tigers spend so much time sleeping? Tigers live in a continual cycle of hunting, eating, and resting. A tiger’s hunt for prey uses a lot of energy, and only about one in every 10-20 hunts is successful. So, when they're not hunting, you'll usually see tigers resting and conserving energy.

Sleeping female tiger at Filmtierpark in Germany
Sleeping female tiger at Filmtierpark in Germany | Source
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Tiger sleeping at Ouwehands Dierenpark Rhenen in the Netherlands
Tiger sleeping at Ouwehands Dierenpark Rhenen in the Netherlands | Source
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Tiger sleeping at the Detroit Zoo
Tiger sleeping at the Detroit Zoo | Source
Tiger taking a nap at Filmtierpark in Germany
Tiger taking a nap at Filmtierpark in Germany | Source
Tiger taking a nap at Secret Garden Las Vegas
Tiger taking a nap at Secret Garden Las Vegas | Source
Tiger sleeping by the water at the Zürich Zoo
Tiger sleeping by the water at the Zürich Zoo | Source
A white Bengal tiger sleeping
A white Bengal tiger sleeping | Source
A tiger sleeping at the Everland Theme Park South Korea.
A tiger sleeping at the Everland Theme Park South Korea. | Source
A tiger sleeping at Disney's Animal Kingdom in Florida
A tiger sleeping at Disney's Animal Kingdom in Florida | Source
Another tiger sleeping at Disney's Animal Kingdom in Florida
Another tiger sleeping at Disney's Animal Kingdom in Florida | Source
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A white tiger sleeping at Busch Gardens safari park in Tampa, Florida
A white tiger sleeping at Busch Gardens safari park in Tampa, Florida | Source
A pair of Siberian tigers napping at Zoo Landau in Germany
A pair of Siberian tigers napping at Zoo Landau in Germany | Source
Malayan tigers sleeping at the Cincinnati Zoo
Malayan tigers sleeping at the Cincinnati Zoo | Source

Pictures of Tiger Cubs

A female tiger gives birth to a litter of about 2-3 cubs. She gives birth to her cubs in a sheltered den, such as a thicket or cave, and she rears her cubs alone. Cubs are born blind and helpless and don’t open their eyes until they are 1-2 weeks old. At age 3-6 months, cubs travel with their mother as she roams her territory, and she teaches them how to hunt. Cubs don’t separate from their mothers until they are about 2–2½ years old.

Tiger cub at the controversial "Tiger Temple" in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand
Tiger cub at the controversial "Tiger Temple" in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand | Source
Malayan tiger cubs playing
Malayan tiger cubs playing | Source
Siberian tigers at Tierpark Berlin
Siberian tigers at Tierpark Berlin | Source
Lion cub at the Philadelphia Zoo
Lion cub at the Philadelphia Zoo | Source
Tiger cub in Berlin Tierpark
Tiger cub in Berlin Tierpark | Source
Siberian tiger cub at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany
Siberian tiger cub at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany | Source
Siberian tiger cubs at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany
Siberian tiger cubs at the Leipzig Zoo in Germany | Source
White tiger cub at the Amnéville Zoo in France
White tiger cub at the Amnéville Zoo in France | Source
White tiger cub at the Moscow Zoo
White tiger cub at the Moscow Zoo | Source

The next set of photos shows Siberian tiger cubs at the Buffalo Zoo in New York.

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The next set of photos is of Siberian tiger cubs at the Zürich Zoo in Switzerland. A male named Lailek and two females named Luva and Liska were born on May 15, 2011 at the zoo.

Tiger cubs Liska and Luva snuggling
Tiger cubs Liska and Luva snuggling | Source
Two cubs playing with a fir tree
Two cubs playing with a fir tree | Source
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Liska and Luva drinking at a pond
Liska and Luva drinking at a pond | Source
Tiger cub Luva sleeping
Tiger cub Luva sleeping | Source
Tiger cub Luva
Tiger cub Luva | Source
Cubs jumping after mom
Cubs jumping after mom | Source
Liska (left) and Luva (right) drinking together at a pond
Liska (left) and Luva (right) drinking together at a pond | Source
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Lailek (left) and Luva (right) resting by a pond
Lailek (left) and Luva (right) resting by a pond | Source
Tiger cubs Liska and Lailek resting
Tiger cubs Liska and Lailek resting | Source
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Mother Elena was playing with one of her cubs and the cub put his paw into her mouth
Mother Elena was playing with one of her cubs and the cub put his paw into her mouth | Source
Lailek play attacking his sister Liska
Lailek play attacking his sister Liska | Source
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Liska entering the water
Liska entering the water | Source
Tiger cubs playing aggressively (Don't worry, none of the cubs got hurt!)
Tiger cubs playing aggressively (Don't worry, none of the cubs got hurt!) | Source
Mother Elena licking her cub Luva
Mother Elena licking her cub Luva | Source
Lailek taking a drink
Lailek taking a drink | Source
Lailek lying on his mother's back
Lailek lying on his mother's back | Source
Cub eating with mom
Cub eating with mom | Source
Cubs playing
Cubs playing | Source
Cubs playing in the water
Cubs playing in the water | Source
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Liska eating a fish that her mother caught for her
Liska eating a fish that her mother caught for her | Source

The next set of photos is of Sumatran tiger cubs at the Frankfurt Zoo in Germany.

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Pictures of White Tigers

Though some people mistakenly believe that the white tiger is its own subspecies, it is actually a rare genetic variation of the Bengal tiger. The white tiger’s color is a recessive trait caused by a lack of red and yellow pigments that produce the tiger’s normally orange color. White tigers are occasionally spotted in the wild, but they are more common in captivity. There are several hundred white tigers in captivity around the world, most of which have been deliberately bred. In addition to their unusual color, white tigers tend to be a bit larger than normal tigers.

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A white tiger at West Midlands Safari Park in England
A white tiger at West Midlands Safari Park in England | Source
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White tiger yawning at the Singapore Zoo
White tiger yawning at the Singapore Zoo | Source
White tiger at the Singapore Zoo
White tiger at the Singapore Zoo | Source
Two white tigers at Zoo Safaripark Stukenbrock in Germany
Two white tigers at Zoo Safaripark Stukenbrock in Germany | Source
A pair of White Bengal Tigers at the Haifa Educational Zoo in Israel
A pair of White Bengal Tigers at the Haifa Educational Zoo in Israel | Source
White tigers playing in the water (Singapore Zoo)
White tigers playing in the water (Singapore Zoo) | Source
White tigers showing affection (Singapore Zoo)
White tigers showing affection (Singapore Zoo) | Source
A pair of affectionate white tigers (Singapore Zoo)
A pair of affectionate white tigers (Singapore Zoo) | Source
Two white tigers (Singapore Zoo)
Two white tigers (Singapore Zoo) | Source
White tiger at the New Delhi Zoo, India
White tiger at the New Delhi Zoo, India | Source
Two white tigers resting at Bannerghatta National Park in India
Two white tigers resting at Bannerghatta National Park in India | Source
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Pictures of Tigers in Water

Tigers and jaguars are the only cats that enjoy swimming and resting in water. Tigers are such strong swimmers that they can swim up to 29 kilometers (18 miles) in a single day. Tigers will go into the water to hunt prey, swim for fun, or cool off on a hot day.

Tiger swimming at Walter Zoo in Gossau, Switzerland
Tiger swimming at Walter Zoo in Gossau, Switzerland | Source
Tiger shaking off water after a swim at Raubtierpark Subingen in Switzerland
Tiger shaking off water after a swim at Raubtierpark Subingen in Switzerland | Source
A pair of tigers in the water at Kristiansand Zoo in Norway
A pair of tigers in the water at Kristiansand Zoo in Norway | Source
A tiger getting in the water at Wuppertal Zoo in Germany
A tiger getting in the water at Wuppertal Zoo in Germany | Source
A Bengal tiger in South Africa
A Bengal tiger in South Africa | Source
A tiger at the San Diego Zoo
A tiger at the San Diego Zoo | Source
Siberian tiger swimming at Wuppertal Zoo in Germany
Siberian tiger swimming at Wuppertal Zoo in Germany | Source
Tiger cooling off at Ranthambhore National Park in India
Tiger cooling off at Ranthambhore National Park in India | Source
 Siberian tiger swimming at Leipzig Zoo in Germany
Siberian tiger swimming at Leipzig Zoo in Germany | Source
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Siberian tiger at the Toronto Zoo
Siberian tiger at the Toronto Zoo | Source
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A tiger cooling off at Ranthambhore National Park in India
A tiger cooling off at Ranthambhore National Park in India | Source
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Malayan Tiger swimming at Zoo Dortmund in Germany
Malayan Tiger swimming at Zoo Dortmund in Germany | Source
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    • MoonByTheSea profile image
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      MoonByTheSea 3 years ago

      Thanks for the kind words, both of you. This hub was a lot of fun to put together.

    • TurtleDog profile image

      TurtleDog 3 years ago

      Wow! I have never, ever, ever seen so many pictures (and nice ones too) on a Hub. I think you set a record. Nice hub, voted up.

    • AUPADHYAY profile image

      ANIL KUMAR UPADHYAY 3 years ago from INDIA, UTTAR PRADESH STATE, KANPUR CITY

      Wow, moonbythesea, what a lovely info hub. Appreciated it too much. Thanks for sharing it. Voted it up too.