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Why was GCB Canceled? A few reasons ...

Updated on February 7, 2013
Why Was GCB Canceled? A Few Reasons ...
Why Was GCB Canceled? A Few Reasons ...

Why was GCB canceled? Here are a few reasons.

The obvious reason it was canceled was the low viewership on ABC. ABC intended GCB to be a replacement for Desperate Housewives, but here are some reasons why GCB failed for ABC.


It was introduced to the American public portraying Christians and Christianity in a negative light:

  • GCB originally meant "Good Christian B*itches," (strike 1) and then ABC was bombarded with feedback by religious and right-winged groups saying that the title would not fly with them. ABC then tried to appease the groups by saying GCB meant "Good Christian Belles. Nice try.
  • The show then went on to portray a cast of stars such as Kristin Chenoweth trying to be very Christian but ending up being hypocritical at the same time (this was basically the premise of the whole show). Again, ABC insulted a whole group of people that is very religious. Not a way to gain viewership or fans. Not that Christian women can't be hypocrites but aren't almost all people hypocritical at one time or another?
  • Mainstream America is Christian. I'm not talking about people from big liberal cities like New York City or L.A. I'm talking about small and mid-sized towns and rural America that makes up about 70% of the landscape of the U.S. That is mainstream America. This America is still very Christian. They aren't going to watch a show that makes fun of the very fabric of their lives.


Women's groups also disliked the title behind GCB from the get-go:

  • The title "Good Christian B*tches" also angered some women's groups who didn't think women should be referred to as "b*itches" in general.


The message of the show didn't resonate with non-Christians that much either:

  • Unless you are specifically a fan of showing Christians in a negative light, then this show might not have appealed to you. And not everyone gets why the premise "everything is big in Texas" should be funny either.


The time slot is bad for new shows:

  • Introducing a new show to America at 10 p.m. on Sunday - when many American people are winding down and getting ready to go to bed for work the next day - is a bad move. People aren't ready for new commitments at 10 p.m.


GCB is an expensive production:

  • Paying stars like Leslie Bibb, Kristin Chenoweth, and Annie Potts; all of the mansions and expensive settings; all of the flashy clothes - do not make for a financially sound show unless the viewership is high. And it wasn't.


It wasn't a great replacement for Desperate Housewives:

  • Desperate Housewives had mystery, intrigue, and sometimes a moral to the end of each story. It also had a wide range of female personalities. It portrayed families, and most notably -- housewives. Housewives are an often ignored segment of America. But you didn't have to be a housewife to like this show. You could simply be female and want a house in the suburbs and a family. You could also be a man. Men I know used to tell me they liked Desperate Housewives because some of the women were hot, there were actual storylines, and that it showed the sneaky side of women's natures. GCB came off as a comedy with cartoonishly portrayed women and a skewed portrayal of Christianity.


I watched about four episodes of GCB. There were things I liked about the show -- the fashion, some of the jokes, the nice houses, Annie Potts, and how most of the women were married with strong husbands -- not deadbeats as modern society often throws in our faces. But it would never have replaced Desperate Housewives for me. That is a show I will truly miss.

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