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Amazing Grace Lyrics, Chords, Words

Updated on April 14, 2013

Amazing Grace Lyrics, Chords, and Words

"Amazing Grace" is a Christian hymn written by English poet and clergyman John Newton (1725-1807), published in 1779. With a message that forgiveness and redemption are possible regardless of the sins people commit and that the soul can be delivered from despair through the mercy of God, "Amazing Grace" is one of the most recognizable songs in the English-speaking world.

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Amazing Grace Lyrics (Words)

How Sweet The Sound!

1. Amazing grace! (how sweet the sound)

That saved a wretch like me!

I once was lost, hut now am found,

Was blind, but now I see.

2. 'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,

And grace my fears relieved;

How precious did that grace appear,

The hour I first believed!

3. Through many dangers, toils and snares,

I have already come;

'Tis grace has brought me safe thus far,

And grace will lead me home.

4. The LORD has promised good to me,

His word my hope secures;

He will my shield and portion be,

As long as life endures.

5. Yes, when this flesh and heart shall fail,

And mortal life shall cease,

I shall possess, within the veil,

A life of joy and peace.

6. The earth shall soon dissolve like snow,

The sun forbear to shine;

But GOD, who called me here below,

Will be for ever mine.

Amazing Grace Chords - American Traditional Melody

Amazing Grace Chords
Amazing Grace Chords

LeAnn Rimes - Amazing Grace (Acapella) - ...that saved a wretch like me...

Wikipedia On Amazing Grace

by English Poet and Clergyman John Newton

"Amazing Grace" is a Christian hymn written by English poet and clergyman John Newton (1725-1807), published in 1779. With a message that forgiveness and redemption are possible regardless of the sins people commit and that the soul can be delivered from despair through the mercy of God, "Amazing Grace" is one of the most recognizable songs in the English-speaking world.

Newton wrote the words from personal experience. He grew up without any particular religious conviction but his life's path was formed by a variety of twists and coincidences that were often put into motion by his recalcitrant insubordination. He was pressed into the Royal Navy and became a sailor, eventually participating in the slave trade. One night a terrible storm battered his vessel so severely that he became frightened enough to call out to God for mercy, a moment that marked the beginning of his spiritual conversion. His career in slave trading lasted a few years more until he quit going to sea altogether and began studying theology.

Ordained in the Church of England in 1764, Newton became curate of Olney, Buckinghamshire, where he began to write hymns with poet William Cowper. "Amazing Grace" was written to illustrate a sermon on New Year's Day of 1773. It is unknown if there was any music accompanying the verses, and it may have been chanted by the congregation without music. It debuted in print in 1779 in Newton and Cowper's Olney Hymns, but settled into relative obscurity in England. In the United States however, "Amazing Grace" was used extensively during the Second Great Awakening in the early 19th century. It has been associated with more than 20 melodies, but in 1835 it was joined to a tune named "New Britain" to which it is most frequently sung today.

Author Gilbert Chase writes that "Amazing Grace" is "without a doubt the most famous of all the folk hymns",Chase, p. 181. and Jonathan Aitken, a Newton biographer, estimates that it is performed about 10 million times annually. It has had particular influence in folk music, and become an emblematic African American spiritual. Its universal message has been a significant factor in its crossover into secular music. "Amazing Grace" saw a resurgence in popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s and has been recorded thousands of times during and since the 20th century, sometimes appearing on popular music charts. read the rest of the Wikipedia article

Elvis Presley - Amazing Grace - Recorded: 1971

Amazing Grace - Bagpipes - Photo Collage

What's So Amazing About Amazing Grace? - by Phillip Yancey

Mention the word "grace" and what immediately comes to mind for most of us is a bagpipe wailing the solemn notes of "Amazing Grace."

The grace of which Philip Yancey writes is the freely given and unmerited favor and love of God. This grace seems a remote, almost sentimental concept, without a place in our lives or our society. It is a vague, slippery thing to us, probably because we seem to experience grace so rarely and have managed to leech the word of meaning. But Philip Yancey has set about to rescue grace in his book What's So Amazing About Grace?

This grace is the true message of Jesus. All faiths have virtues and creeds and justice and truth, but Jesus speaks merely of receiving the love that God has for us. Accepting it, not earning it or making ourselves worthy of it. And frankly, accepting something we have not earned or are not worthy of is not an easy thing for most of us.

In truth, grace is both utterly simple and utterly confounding. Little by little, Yancey guides us into a clearer understanding of grace by using stories, in much the same way Jesus did. We read stories of both grace and ungrace at work in people's lives. Sadly, it is stories of ungrace that are more prevalent today, the current culture wars painful acknowledgments of ungrace in our lives as Christians in this country. Yancey helps us understand that ungrace is that state of being in which self-righteousness and pride are a result of thinking that we have somehow earned God's approval and may now stand in judgment in his behalf.

Philip Yancey was awarded the Gold Medallion Christian Book of the Year award for this book in 1998 by the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association. Readers concurred with this decision, making this book an immediate bestseller. Believers and nonbelievers alike should accept Yancey's challenge to become agents of grace rather than agents of vengeance or judgment or anger. In truth, we are each starving for grace, ready to grasp it tightly. And it is through grace that all other hungers--for justice, for righteousness, for love--are satisfied. Yancey opens his book by telling us that "grace" is the last best word, and in What's So Amazing About Grace?, he proves that he's right.

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    • ThreeQuarters2Day profile image

      Dawn Romine 

      4 years ago from Nebraska

      We sang Amazing Grace in church yesterday, my husband just belted it, it was in his voice sweet spot.

    • samanthaperry profile image

      samanthaperry 

      5 years ago

      This cuts right to the Heart,we played at my brother's funeral

      a piper followed the coffin in the church and was playing this on the Bagpipes.

    • lisln profile image

      LorLinda 

      5 years ago from Denver Colorado

      I love this song in our music ministry Unison we sang this often. I do believe in His grace!

    • JoanieMRuppel54 profile image

      Joanie Ruppel 

      5 years ago from Keller, Texas

      I watched the movie Amazing Grace on a flight from Dallas to London - how appropriate! I also love Chris Tomlin's version - we sang that at my husbands funeral. Love this lens!

    • teamlane profile imageAUTHOR

      teamlane 

      5 years ago

      @mountainstevo: You're welcome mountainstevo! :)

    • mountainstevo profile image

      mountainstevo 

      5 years ago

      I love this song. One of my favorites... especially when Elvis sings it. Has such deep meaning.

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