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Is there any pitch difference between D-sharp and E-flat when you are playing on the violin?


 

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Aficionada says

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4 years ago
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  • ViolinByCourtney profile image

    Courtney Morgan (ViolinByCourtney) 4 years ago

    This is a very good answer. I was never told that they were the same when I began learning to play the violin, so I was confused when I began learning music theory.


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Bruce Chamoff (hotwebideas) says

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6 years ago
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    Courtney Morgan (ViolinByCourtney) 4 years ago

    Because members of the violin family (violin, viola, cello, and bass) are not fretted, they, as well as the human voice and some winds, are the only instruments that can hit intermediate frequencies between half steps without stopping to retune.

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stratocarter says

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6 years ago
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paulie43 says

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6 years ago
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  • Frances Metcalfe profile image

    Frances Metcalfe 5 months ago

    E flat is absolutely higher than d sharp albeit by a misicule amount. If you do not play only a keyboard you may not know. Piano tuners have to compromise when tuning, if you play fifths all up the keyboard you will hear they aren't all pure.